45 theologians condemn Pope Francis’ Amoris Laetitia, accuse his Apostolic Exhortation of heresy

 

JULY 31, 2016

 

45 theologians condemn Pope Francis’ Amoris Laetitia, accuse his Apostolic Exhortation of heresy

Only the bold emphases in blue, green and red colour are mine -Michael

The run-up:

‘We are being put to the test’: Prominent Catholic academics say Pope’s exhortation presents danger to Church

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/we-are-being-put-to-the-test-prominent-catholic-academics-say-popes-exhorta

By Claire Chretien, June 14, 2016

Prominent Catholic philosophers and a world expert on the Church Fathers have joined the growing chorus of voices expressing deep concerns over the implications of Pope Francis’s controversial exhortation Amoris Laetitia.

“What was certain before has become problematic,” due to the pope’s signature ambiguity, wrote Dr. Jude P. Dougherty, the dean emeritus of the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America, in a column at The Wanderer.

The seeming “internal waffling” going on inside the Church over the issue of Holy Communion for the divorced and remarried is undermining the Church’s moral authority, Dougherty wrote, at a time when “Western civilization itself, detached from its classical sources, seems to be at stake.”

Following the release of Amoris Laetitia, cardinals and bishops who had argued for a change in sacramental practice claimed victory, arguing that footnote 351 of Amoris Laetitia opened the door for a significant change toward the sacraments for those in unions the Church teaches are objectively sinful.

Many orthodox Catholic writers agreed that Amoris Laetitia contradicts Church teaching on the issue and expressed concern that it will lead to sacrilege and rupture within the church.

With “one stroke of a pen,” Pope Francis turned “chaos into principle” and is leading the Church “into the direction of schism,” said Professor Robert Spaemann, a leading Catholic philosopher and close friend of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. Such a schism would not be “at the periphery, but in the middle of the Church,” he warned, asserting that Amoris Laetitia is a clear “breach” with Church teaching.

Pope Francis
later said he didn’t remember
writing the document’s most notorious footnote.

“His academic positions apart, what gives Robert Spaemann authority is the natural law tradition which he represents and to which the Church herself is accountable,” wrote Dougherty.

He continued:

The Church did not invent morality, but over the centuries it has promulgated the highest moral principles known to mankind. Clearly, discipline related to the divinely instituted sacraments is her province. Through the sacraments she has taught and promoted personal moral behavior. That achievement has contributed beyond measure to the creation of Western culture.


‘We have lost all foothold’ like Alice in Wonderland
Dr. Anna M. Silvas, a professor at the University of New England and at the Australian Catholic University and one of the world’s top experts on the Church Fathers, delivered an especially blunt criticism of Amoris Laetitia “before a packed crowd with bishops and priests” in Melbourne Australia.

Prominent Italian Catholic journalist Sandro Magister
re-published the entire commentary
on his blog Chiesa and called ita must-read. Brilliant, acute, expert, straightforward. A luminous example of that “parresìa” which is the duty of every baptized person.”

Silvas
wrote that Amoris Laetitia
undermines Church doctrine by embracing Cardinal Walter Kasper’s proposal that those in unions the Church considers to be adulterous be permitted in some circumstances to receive Holy Communion.    

She criticized the document’s ambiguity and subjectivism, Pope Francis’s “language of emotion” that is more reflective of the “mentality of the popular media” than the Church Fathers, and Amoris Laetitia‘s “long tracts of homespun avuncular advice that could be given by any secular journalist without the faith” that are often completely bereft of any mention of Christ. “Even the most pious reading of ‘Amoris Laetitia’ cannot say that it has avoided ambiguity,” wrote Silva.

Silva also dissected Amoris Laetitia‘s introduction of the notion that one can be in an objective situation of mortal sin yet still be living and growing in God’s grace.

 

 

The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches that mortal sin “results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God’s forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ’s kingdom and the eternal death of hell” (CCC 1861).

Silva wrote:

The new doctrine that Pope Francis had flagged a little earlier he now repeats and reasserts: a person can be in an objective situation of mortal sin – for that is what he is speaking about – and still be living and growing in God’s grace, all the ‘while receiving the help of the Church’, which, the infamous footnote 351 declares, can include, ‘in certain cases’, both confession and holy communion. I am sure that there are by now many busily attempting to ‘interpret’ all this according to a ‘hermeneutic of continuity’, to show its harmony, I presume, with Tradition. I might add that in this n. 305, Pope Francis quotes himself four times. In fact, it appears that Pope Francis’ most frequently cited reference through ‘Amoris laetitia’ is himself, and that in itself is interesting.

“I feel that we have lost all foothold, and fallen like Alice into a parallel universe, where nothing is quite what it seems to be,” wrote Silva.

Quoting the words of Jesus Christ, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another, commits adultery against her” (Mk 10:11) and the apostle Paul, “She will be called an adulteress if she lives with another man while her husband is alive” (Rom 7:3), Silva wrote:

Like a deafening absence, the term “adultery” is entirely absent from the lexicon of “Amoris Laetitia”. Instead we have something called “‘irregular’ unions”, or “irregular situations”, with the “irregular” in double quotation marks as if to distance the author even from this usage.

“If you love me”, says our Lord, keep my commandments (John 14:15), and the Gospel and Letters of John repeats this admonition of our Lord in various ways. It means, not that our conduct is justified by our subjective feelings, but rather, our subjective disposition is verified in our conduct, i.e., in the obediential act. Alas, as we look into AL, we find that “commandments” too are entirely absent from its lexicon, as is also obedience. Instead we have something called “ideals”, appearing repeatedly throughout the document.

Other key words I miss too from the language of this document: the fear of the Lord. You know, that awe of the sovereign reality of God that is the beginning of wisdom, one of the gifts of the Holy Spirit in confirmation. But indeed this holy fear has long vanished from a vast sweep of modern catholic discourse. It is a semitic idiom for “eulabeia” and “eusebia” in Greek, or in Latin, “pietas” and “religio”, the core of a Godward disposition, the very spirit of religion.

Another register of language is also missing in “Amoris Laetitia” is that of eternal salvation. There are no immortal souls in need of eternal salvation to be found in this document! True, we do have “eternal life” and “eternity” nominated in nn. 166 and 168 as the seemingly inevitable “fulfillment” of a child’s destiny, but with no hint that any of the imperatives of grace and struggle, in short, of eternal salvation, are involved in getting there.


The real Pharisees: ‘Cardinal Kasper and his allies’

“The entire tenor of chapter eight is problematic, not just n. 304 and footnote 351,” wrote Silva of the exhortation’s most controversial portion. “As soon as I finished it, I thought to myself: Clear as a bell: Pope Francis wanted some form of the Kasper proposal from the beginning.”

“Here it is. Kasper has won,” she continued. “It all explains Pope Francis’ terse comments at the end of the 2015 Synod, when he censured narrow-minded ‘pharisees’ – evidently those who had frustrated a better outcome according to his agenda. ‘Pharisees’? The sloppiness of his language! They were the modernists, in a way, of Judaism, the masters of ten thousand nuances – and most pertinently, those who tenaciously upheld the practice of divorce and remarriage. The real analogues of the pharisees in this whole affair are Kasper and his allies.”

Throughout his papacy,
Pope Francis has criticized “narrow-minded,” “rigid” Catholics. In his closing speech at the 2015 Synod on the Family, Pope Francis condemned Catholics who “hide behind the Church’s teachings” and “sit in the chair of Moses and judge, sometimes with superiority and superficiality, difficult cases and wounded families.”

Footnote 351 implies that in an objective situation of sin, “it is possible for the miscreant to be subjectively innocent,” wrote Dougherty. But the problem this footnote presents is that of a confessor who “may become aware that a penitent has not confessed a sin because he has no idea that it is a sin. If this be the case, the penitent can validly receive absolution.”

In other words, if a Catholic doesn’t know that his conduct is sinful, then he’s not fully liable for it. 

“But the confessor is obliged to set matters straight by correcting the malformed conscience and by guiding the penitent through the process of forming a correct conscience,” continued Dougherty. “The key question then becomes: ‘Can this doctrinally well-founded practice be extended to the divorced and remarried?’ The answer is ‘No.’ The penitent, once made aware that his conduct is at odds with the teaching of the Church, must refrain from Holy Communion.”

The next battle: Church recognition of same-sex unions?
Amoris Laetitia seems to embrace situational ethics—the notion that morality varies by circumstance—by corrupting and twisting the teachings of Pope St. John Paul II and the Second Vatican Council, Silva wrote. The historian predicted that the Church will soon face a similar battle over same-sex unions.

“If it is possible to construct a justification of states of objective adultery, on the basis of recognizing ‘the constructive elements in those situations not yet corresponding to the Church’s teaching on marriage’ (n. 292), ‘when such unions attain a particular stability, legally recognized, are characterized by deep affection and responsibility for their offspring’ (n. 293) etc., how long can you defer applying exactly the same line or reasoning to same-sex partnerships?” she asked.

 

 

 

 

Church leaders “will have to make practical dispositions in regard to the thorny issues of ‘Amoris Laetitia,'” and they have an obligation to speak the truth, Silva concluded. Silva warned bishops that they must be prepared for the persecution that can come from within the Church for defending the faith:

…in our own minds, we should have no doubt teaching of the Gospel is, and ever will be. Obviously, whatever strategy of pressing for an official clarification of projected pastoral practice that can be devised, must be tried. I particularly urge this on bishops. Some of you may find yourselves in very difficult situations in regard to your peers, almost calling for the virtues of a confessor of the faith. Are you ready for the whipping, figuratively speaking, you may incur? You could of course, choose the illusory safety of conventional shallowness and superficial good cheer, a great temptation of ecclesiastics as company men. I don’t advise it. The times are serious, perhaps much more serious than we suspect. We are being put to the test. “The Lord is here. He is calling you”.

 

2 of 3 comments

1. Thank you for this thoughtful article. Lately, as I have considered the chaos of the past three plus years, I see in hindsight that the modernist agenda of this pope was clearly evident in his rush to hold the two synods on the “family.” I recall having a very uneasy feeling as I answered the questions sent to my diocese and dioceses around the world. Very strange and leading questions that had a clearly desired outcome. Funny how his three years differ so much from the three years of Jesus’s public ministry.

2. Sometimes I wonder just to what point this pope is being manipulated; I mean, when you don’t even write your own exhortations, what does that say? But then I look at everything he has said off the cuff and the only common sense conclusion I can come to is that he is personally at odds with the teaching of Jesus Christ. The way it’s shaping up, we are on the verge of the Great Apostasy where we will have to choose between following a heresiarch or staying true to Jesus. “As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord” (Joshua).

 

 

45 Catholic academics urge cardinals to ask Pope Francis to fix exhortation’s errors

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/45-catholic-academics-urge-cardinals-to-ask-pope-francis-to-fix-exhortation

By Claire Chretien, July 14, 2016

Forty-five Catholic prelates, academics, and clergy have submitted an appeal to the Dean of the College of Cardinals in Rome requesting that the cardinals and Eastern Catholic Patriarchs petition Pope Francis to repudiate a list of erroneous propositions that can be drawn from Amoris Laetitia.

The appeal will be sent in various languages to the 218 living Catholic Cardinals and Patriarchs over the coming weeks.

The unnamed signatories contend that the exhortation contains “a number of statements that can be understood in a sense that is contrary to Catholic faith and morals.” According to the group’s press release, the signatories submitted along with their appeal a documented list of applicable theological censures specifying “the nature and degree of the errors that could be attributed to Amoris laetitia.”

The group’s appeal asks the cardinals, in their capacities as the Pope’s official advisers, to approach Pope Francis with a request that he reject “the errors listed in the document in a definitive and final manner, and to authoritatively state that Amoris laetitia does not require any of them to be believed or considered as possibly true.”

We are not accusing the pope of
heresy,” said Dr. Joseph Shaw, a signatory and a spokesman for the group of scholars and pastors, “but we consider that numerous propositions in Amoris laetitia can be construed as heretical upon a natural reading of the text. Additional statements would fall under other established theological censures, such as scandalous, erroneous in faith, and ambiguous, among others.”

“It is our hope that by seeking from our Holy Father a definitive repudiation of these errors we can help to allay the confusion already brought about by Amoris laetitia among pastors and the lay faithful,” continued Shaw. “For that confusion can be dispelled effectively only by an unambiguous affirmation of authentic Catholic teaching by the Successor of Peter.”

The group takes issue with nineteen passages in Amoris Laetitia that seem to contradict Catholic doctrine and maintains that the exhortation undermines the Church’s teaching that divorced and civilly remarried Catholics who are not living abstinently may not receive the Sacraments.  

Some of the portions of the exhortation that seemingly contradict the Church’s teaching are related to the seeming suggestion that some would be incapable of obeying the Commandments, the objective sinfulness of certain acts, the headship of the husband, the superiority of consecrated virginity over the married life, and the legitimacy of capital punishment under certain circumstances.

According to the group’s press release, Catholic prelates, scholars, professors, authors, and clergy from various pontifical universities, seminaries, colleges, theological institutes, religious orders, and dioceses around the world are among the signatories.

“The signatories come from all over the world and include pastors, academics in philosophy, and some bishops, as well as theologians,” Shaw told LifeSiteNews.  He said the group has received no responses yet.

In a statement, Shaw explained why the letter has not yet been made public.

“The appeal and cover letter are directed to the cardinals for action in the first place, and we have taken the view that the Sacred College should be allowed to consider the substance of the document and the action to be taken in response to it before its contents are made public,” he said. “The censures are a detailed and technical theological document whose contents are not readily accessible to a non-specialist audience, and are easily misrepresented or misunderstood.

 

 

 

Making the document public would impede the cardinals in their task by the media coverage and frequently uninformed debate and polemics it would raise.”

Shaw continued, “At the same time it is important that Catholics who are troubled by some of the statements in Amoris Laetitia be aware that steps are being taken to address the problems it raises; hence the announcement of the document’s existence.”

“By the same token we aren’t releasing the names of the signatories, though some have agreed to be named,” such as Shaw himself and Father Brian Harrison, Shaw told LifeSiteNews.

The signatories join numerous other Catholic theologians and philosophers in expressing concern that the exhortation endorses practices that are contrary to Church teaching.

Pope Francis’s ambiguity means “what was certain before has become problematic,” Dr. Jude P. Dougherty, the dean emeritus of the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America, wrote after the exhortation’s release.

Dr. Anna M. Silvas, a professor at the University of New England and one of the world’s experts on the Church Fathers, delivered a particularly blunt criticism of Amoris Laetitia in which she noted the document failed to mention the term “adultery” and even “the most pious reading of ‘Amoris Laetitia’ cannot say that it has avoided ambiguity.”

The document seems to embrace situation ethics and the Kasper proposal to admit to the Sacraments those living unrepentantly in objectively sinful situations, Silvas said.

“I feel that we have lost all foothold, and fallen like Alice into a parallel universe, where nothing is quite what it seems to be,” she wrote.

Professor Robert Spaemann, a prominent Catholic philosopher and close personal friend of Pope Benedict XVI, said that Amoris Laetitia presents a “breach” with Catholic Tradition and contradicts Pope St. John Paul II’s exhortation Familiaris Consortio.

 

8 of 48 comments

1. Will the Pope clarify things? I hope he will, but I doubt it. I hope that I am wrong, but Pope Francis will likely see these courageous individuals as fundamentalists, rigid doctrinaires, and Pharisees. Will he then say “who am I to judge them,” or will he judge and scold them? Let’s hope that Pope Francis clarify things and apologizes for having creating so much confusion among the faithful. If anyone deserves an apology, it is the faithful that he has confused, not the homosexuals.

2. There’s no mistake. I will go so far as to say this man is a heretic. He and his very intelligent collaborators know full well what he is about. The time has come to say “enough”. Bravo to those that are addressing the issue! In time, all the faithful will see him for what he really is.

3. It sure SEEMS like this is a papacy of intentional confusion.

4. I fear that this initiative will be ignored, but it is good that people of good will try to do something. It assumes that Pope Francis and his closest collaborators are so incompetent to not understand what they are doing. The problem with the current church leadership is much more serious. I do not know, but probably there is an infiltration of the freemasonry that is attempting to undermine the Church mission and doctrine to reduce it to a New World Order religion.

5. We can be sure the initiative will be ignored by King Francis the First. He has already said he doesn’t care what conservative bishops are saying about him and his ideas. “They do what they do and I do what I do.” he said. What arrogance! There can be no doubt this heretic Pope is determined to do as he pleases.

6. Well, it didn’t take the Holy Father long to squash Cardinal Sarah’s plea to concede a vestige of orthodoxy to the much-abused Novus Ordo Mass.

My guess is that this latest document challenging the heretical bent of AL will either be summarily ignored or waved off scoffingly in yet another of Francis’ scandalous, off-the-cuff quips.

Hopefully, these 45 theologians will pave the way for 100s or 1000s more who see through the veneer of Catholicism that can no longer obscure the Modernist stranglehold in Rome.

6. In yet another off the cuff Q and A session published by Osservatore Romano on June 8th the pope himself said: “I am by nature irresponsible, and so I will continue” http://eponymousflower.blogspo…

7. “We are not accusing the pope of heresy,” said Dr. Joseph Shaw.
Why the heck not? He is obstinate in
heresy, e.g. couples faithful in fornication have the grace of Matrimony.

8. It is necessary to go the extra mile in order to rid ourselves of this Modernist Cabal. PF must be called out for HERESY!

 

 

More details surface about 45 theologians’ appeal to correct Amoris Laetitia’s errors

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/more-details-surface-about-45-theologians-appeal-to-correct-amoris-laetitia

By Claire Chretien, July 20, 2016

New details have emerged about the letter 45 theologians sent to every Catholic patriarch and cardinal asking them to petition Pope Francis to fix a list of erroneous propositions in Amoris Laetitia.  

The group’s spokesman Dr. Joseph Shaw, a University of Oxford academic and chairman of the Latin Mass Society, told LifeSiteNews that the list of signatories is not in any way limited to theologians who are viewed as liturgical traditionalists, thus showing that there is wide concern about Amoris Laetitia across the world of Catholic academia.

Upon the announcement of the existence the letter (precious LSN article), Shaw said, “Numerous propositions in Amoris laetitia can be construed as heretical upon a natural reading of the text. Additional statements would fall under other established theological censures, such as scandalous, erroneous in faith, and ambiguous, among others.”

 

 

 

The letter asks all 218 living cardinals and patriarchs to petition Pope Francis with a request that he reject “the errors listed in the document in a definitive and final manner, and to authoritatively state that Amoris laetitia does not require any of them to be believed or considered as possibly true.”

The Catholic Herald reported Monday that it had obtained a copy of the letter, which the Herald said stressed that it “does not deny or question the personal faith of Pope Francis.” According to the Herald, the signatories wrote that it is necessary for Pope Francis to issue a clarification about the exhortation’s ambiguous passages, from which the signatories say heretical propositions can be drawn, in order for the portions of Amoris Laetitia that affirm Catholic doctrine to be truly effective. The Herald reported that among the signatories were “several distinguished figures, including one of Britain’s best-known theologians and the founder of a French religious community.”

The report included new details on the nineteen passages in the exhortation with which the signatories expressed concern. The letter states that the “vagueness or ambiguity” of these passages “permit interpretations that are contrary to faith or morals, or that suggest a claim that is contrary to faith and morals without actually stating it. It also contains statements whose natural meaning would seem to be contrary to faith or morals.” The letter cites Amoris Laetitia‘s claim that someone could “be in a concrete situation which does not allow him or her to act differently and decide otherwise without further sin” and asks Pope Francis to clarify that this does not mean “that a justified person has not the strength with God’s grace to carry out the objective demands of the divine law, as though any of the commandments of God are impossible for the justified; or as meaning that God’s grace, when it produces justification in an individual, does not invariably and of its nature produce conversion from all serious sin, or is not sufficient for conversion from all serious sin.”

The exhortation’s seeming implication that it may be impossible for some people to live according to Christian teaching is one of the many elements of it that has caused Catholics around the world to raise their concerns with the document. Many have done so more publicly.

The lay group Voice of the Family released a
list of doctrinal errors and ambiguities
contained in Amoris Laetitia and
called on Pope Francis to withdraw it. Bishop Athanasius Schneider, Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Maria Santissima in Astana, Kazakhstan, said that the
confusion the document has produced
points to the need for clarification that the document is in line with official Church teaching.

Some Catholic bishops, such as Bishop Thomas Paprocki of the Diocese of Springfield, Illinois and Archbishop Charles J. Chaput of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, have said that the only appropriate way to read Amoris Laetitia is in continuity with the Church’s longstanding teachings.

This is also the view that Cardinal Raymond Burke has advanced. Following the exhortation’s release, Burke, who is the patron of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta and former Prefect of the Apostolic Signatura, the Vatican’s highest court,
wrote that Amoris Laetitia
is not magisterial and therefore cannot change Church teaching or practice.

Others, like Cardinal Walter Kasper and Cardinal Christoph Schönborn, have celebrated the exhortation as opening the door for the practice of admitting to the Sacraments those living unrepentantly in situations the Church labels objectively sinful.

Shaw has previously explained that the signatories sent the letter straight to cardinals rather than publicly releasing it because “we have taken the view that the Sacred College should be allowed to consider the substance of the document and the action to be taken in response to it before its contents are made public.”

“The censures are a detailed and technical theological document whose contents are not readily accessible to a non-specialist audience, and are easily misrepresented or misunderstood,” said Shaw.

 

3 of 14 comments

1. Pope Francis may very well be known in the very near future as a heretical pope. His words speak loudly concerning his beliefs. More Catholics are waking up about this man whereas at first they defended him.

2. The recent letter the Pope sent to Poland preparing for World Youth Day explicitly mentions he is bringing the spirit of Amoris Laetitia with him in this Jubilee Year of Mercy. No backing down from him, only more promotion of his agenda on another world stage commanding widespread media attention. Sad to think he is going to use the occasion of the gathering of the world’s Catholic youth to indoctrinate them in the errors. Perhaps people should be questioning the personal faith of Jorge Bergoglio in his attachment to the principles of the Modernist heresy, which includes using ambiguity to sow confusion to advance change in doctrines.

3. Do not think for a moment the suggested review and clarification appealed will ever come to pass. There is a method to the Bergoglian madness. He will have his way.

 

 

Heresy:

Full text of 45 theologians’ appeal to correct Amoris Laetitia’s errors revealed

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/full-text-of-45-theologians-appeal-to-correct-amoris-laetitias-errors-revea

By Claire Chretien, July 28, 2016

The full letter that 45 Catholic academics sent to the Dean of the College of Cardinals requesting that the cardinals and Eastern Catholic Patriarchs petition Pope Francis to repudiate a list of erroneous propositions that can be drawn from Amoris Laetitia has been published in full on the website The Australian (see the article further below).

The contents of the letter and its signatories were
originally not released to the public
(see the article on page 3), only sent to all living 218 Catholic cardinals and patriarchs. The signers announced the existence of the letter so that “Catholics who are troubled by some of the statements in Amoris Laetitia be aware that steps are being taken to address the problems it raises,” Dr. Joseph Shaw, an Oxford academic and the group’s spokesman, told LifeSiteNews in a statement earlier this month.

 

 

“The organizers did not make these documents public, since they are addressed to the Cardinals and Patriarchs, who would ideally have been allowed to consider them without the distraction of public controversy over the documents,” Shaw said.

Shaw previously explained that the organizers did not want to make the document public because “the censures are a detailed and technical theological document whose contents are not readily accessible to a non-specialist audience, and are easily misrepresented or misunderstood. Making the document public would impede the cardinals in their task by the media coverage and frequently uninformed debate and polemics it would raise.”

“We request that the Cardinals and Patriarchs petition the Holy Father to condemn the errors listed in the document in a definitive and final manner, and to authoritatively state that Amoris Laetitia does not require any of them to be believed or considered as possibly true,” the signatories wrote.

On July 18, the Catholic Herald reported that it had received a copy of the full letter and signatories. The Herald published
further details about the letter
(see the article on page 4), such as the concern it expresses that Amoris Laetitia “contains statements whose natural meaning would seem to be contrary to faith or morals,” but did not publish the letter in full or the names of the signatories. On July 22, the National Catholic Reporter published the full list of signatories, which includes a number of distinguished theologians, priests, and professors.

And on July 27, Tess Livingstone published the full document and list of signatories on the website The Australian. Livingstone is the biographer of Australian Cardinal George Pell, but her story contains no indication of how she procured the leaked document.

Shaw said neither the National Catholic Reporter nor The Australian had authorization to publish the list of signatories and the document.

“The critique is the work of a number of Catholic scholars who were concerned that Catholics might understand some passages of Amoris Laetitia as contradicting the doctrine of the Catholic faith,” Shaw said in a statement after the document’s leak. “The remedy for this danger is an authoritative and final statement by the Supreme Pontiff stating that these understandings cannot be held by Catholics, and that Amoris Laetitia does not present them as magisterial teachings or require that they be believed. The College of Cardinals has the function of advising the Pope. The patriarchs of the Eastern Catholic churches also have the right and responsibility to advise the Supreme Pontiff on this matter in virtue of the importance of their office. Accordingly a document was drafted setting forth the gravest dangers of the text of Amoris Laetitia and sent to the cardinals and patriarchs, along with a letter requesting them to petition the Pope to condemn the errors at issue.”

Shaw explained that the document indicates “the dangers to the faith found in passages of Amoris Laetitia, in light of the ways they can be understood … by the application of theological censures.”

He stressed that the critique’s censures, which are essentially theological judgments denouncing errors that are incompatible with truths revealed by Jesus Christ and upheld by the Catholic Church, “are purely doctrinal and not juridical in nature.”

“Theological censures are terms that identify the precise character of a threat to faith and morals that is found in an assertion. The various censures used in the document refer either to the gravity of the error found in a statement, or to [the] harmful effects that are liable to result from it,” Shaw said. “The censures in the critique are purely doctrinal and not juridical in nature, as the signatories do not claim or possess the authority necessary to impose juridical censures. They do not question the personal faith of Pope Francis or claim that he assents to the propositions censured. This is shown by the purpose of the document, which is to obtain a condemnation of these propositions by the Pope. Censures of this kind may be assigned by any person in the Church who has the knowledge, role, and mission needed to teach concerning questions of faith and morals.”

Amoris Laetitia ‘can mislead Catholics into believing what is false and doing what is forbidden by divine law’

“The apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia, issued by Pope Francis on March 19th, 2016 and addressed to bishops, priests, deacons, consecrated persons, Christian married couples, and all the lay faithful, has caused grief and confusion to many Catholics on account of its apparent disagreement with a number of teachings of the Catholic Church on faith and morals. This situation poses a grave danger to souls,” the letter begins. It cited the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas that “inferiors are bound to correct their superiors publicly when there is an imminent danger to the faith” and the Latin Code of Canon Law’s affirmation that “the Catholic faithful have the right and at times the duty, in keeping with their knowledge, competence, and position, to make known their views on matters which concern the good of the Church.”

“The problem with Amoris Laetitia is not that it has imposed legally binding rules that are intrinsically unjust or authoritatively taught binding teachings that are false,” the theologians contend. “The document does not have the authority to promulgate unjust laws or to require assent to false teachings, because the Pope does not have the power to do these things. The problem with the document is that it can mislead Catholics into believing what is false and doing what is forbidden by divine law. … What is important about the document is the damaging effect it can have on the belief and moral life of Catholics.”

From portions of Amoris Laetitia, propositions that are heretical, contrary to Sacred Scripture, and scandalous can be drawn, according to the censures.

The statement that the Church “firmly” rejects the death penalty and the implication that it is always unjust, the denial that wives should submit to their husbands, and the denial that a virginal state of life consecrated to Christ is superior in itself to the state of Christian marriage are several of the propositions drawn from Amoris Laetitia that the document censures as contrary to Sacred Scripture.

 

 

 

Using Sacred Scripture and a number of authoritative Church teachings, particularly from the Council of Trent, the document also condemned suggestions from Amoris Laetitia that:

—Living according to the teachings of the Gospel may be impossible for some people

—No one is condemned to hell

— “The divorced and civilly remarried who choose their situation with full knowledge and full consent of the will are not in a state of serious sin, and that they can receive sanctifying grace and grow in charity,”

— “A Catholic believer can have full knowledge of a divine law and voluntarily choose to break it in a serious matter, but not be in a state of mortal sin as a result of this action”

— “A person with full knowledge of a divine law can sin by choosing to obey that law”

—One’s conscience can “truly judge” that sexual sins explicitly condemned by the Gospel “can sometimes be morally right or requested or commanded by God”

— “Our Lord Jesus Christ wills that the Church abandon her perennial discipline of refusing the Eucharist to the divorced and remarried and of refusing absolution to the divorced and remarried who do not express contrition for their state of life and a firm purpose of amendment with regard to it”

— “Absence of grave fault due to diminished responsibility can permit admission to the Eucharist in the cases of divorced and civilly remarried persons who do not separate, nor undertake to live in perfect continence, but remain in an objective state of adultery and bigamy”

“Catholic theologians have a strict duty to speak out against the apparent errors in the document,” the signatories wrote. “This statement on Amoris Laetitia is intended to fulfil that duty, and to assist the hierarchy of the Church in addressing this situation.”

 

6 of 8 comments

1. This is truly a valiant, and sadly necessary, effort on the part of an informed laity. Don’t count on Pope Francis listening and addressing the problem. The German bishops have too much money to lose from church income coming from the state. If the document is properly revised as it should be based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church, this funding source will surely diminish. It’s a question of billions of dollars.

2. This is just the kind of resistance to Amoris Laetitia that we’ve been crying out for since its publication. It is such a blessing that these honourable Catholic men have banded together to untie the knots in AL & have the courage to append their signatures to it. This breaks the silence so stubbornly adhered to by our Cardinals & Bishops who should be standing up for the faith they were ordained to uphold, i.e. the One Holy Catholic & Apostolic one, handed down directly from St. Peter & the First Apostles, whom Jesus Christ chose to be His first Pope & Bishops. Their present successors are only interested in political achievements, e.g. climate change, economic injustice etc. which are the responsibilities of civil government, while ignoring the spiritual direction & necessities that all mankind crave for & which they are particularly equipped to provide. They should be collectively ashamed of themselves, but we thank God that He has provided us with an academically strong & responsible laity to challenge the inherently unacceptable attempts by the author(s) of this (Binding?) Papal Exhortation to change Catholic Doctrine by the back door.

3. I read the whole document theologically taking apart the apostolic exhortation. It is only 13 pages, clear, concise, scholarly, unemotional intellectual reflection. St. Thomas Aquinas would have approved of its detached tone, although the passion for the truth of Catholicism which underlies it shines through. The only disingenuous thing about it is that the theological scholars surely know Pope Francis is an ideologue committed to the errors and will not issue corrections as a similarly detached Pontiff. But it is a contribution in its approach, similar to the way Bishop Schneider asked the Pope for clarifications, he too knowing full well Francis backs his exhortation. Bergoglio has already defended Amoris Laetitia as fully orthodox. Now that the step has been taken in this approach of asking for corrections, when will the opposition to the Pope become public in the hierarchy when the corrections are not forthcoming? Ever?

4. No nothing will happen. The vast majority of self-labeled Catholics lost the faith decades ago. We have this document and its authors only because the majority liberal church wanted to “out” these individuals. The Bible predicts a remnant, so expecting the opposite would seem unscriptural, except for those for whom scripture is a metaphor for progressivism and being nice.

5. Are we going to see a correction from Pope Francis? I would hope so. This would clear all the confusion he has brought to the Church since he became the pope. But what is the probability that this will happen? Sadly, I would say very close to zero. Bravo for the courageous 45!

6. Yes, correction will come in time – and, I mean, *in time*. Maybe too long for some souls. And not before boot-o-the-ground “official” damage is done.

It’s already started – officially, with the Vatican releasing that new *sex manual* (as reported here on LifeSite a few days past) adjusting the teaching of the Church to the *new normal*. As with the A.L., the new norm adjustments are prefaced by loads of good and reasonable points and affirmations; the point of which is to lead us to says lots of “yes” and “that’s right” before the *new norming* section hits us broadside in the face. If one understands advertising and propaganda that’s the way to yield up submission.

And the submission will come through the young – of course, in a Catholic way – with the young dogmatizing the “new norms”, especially the poisonous notion that sexuality is first and primarily about identity and expression. Which is what I came away with after reading LifeSite’s review of the Vatican’s (A.L.’s) new *sex manual”.

So you see, A.L.’s digging in, its damage, has already begun. So, will it be generation hence, or two, before correction can begin? Will it be too late?

 

 

 

 

As I mentioned earlier, what these signatories fear will really, truly become boots-on-the-ground – trampling doctrine, souls, and bodies – when the Vatican officiates a working group to review and *adjust* the wording of the Catechism. By then *new norm* Catholicism will – to the acclaim of many – be official. With the issuing of the new-fangled sex manual that shout out may be just around the bend.

Regarding clues to how the Catechism will be *reworded*, the Vatican Sex Manual just (well) clued us in: homosexuality is now “to be discovered”.

Will the Francis Catholic Youth reject that? No. They will find it quite *normal*. Find it thus, because they so wish to be Catholic in this world, to their generation, And Pope Francis just gave them the motive and methodology to do so – to go forth and create chaos (to live a “chaotic faith”).

 

 

The Apostolic Exhortation Amoris laetitia: a theological critique and Letter to Cardinal Sodano

https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=11324

By Msgr. Ignacio Barreiro, Rev. Brian W. Harrison, O.S., M.A., S.T.D., Peter A. Kwasniewski

OnePeter5

Originally published on the website of The Australian

 

To Cardinal Angelo Sodano, Dean of the College of Cardinals

29th June, 2016

Your Eminence,

As Catholic theologians and philosophers, church historians and pastors of souls, we are writing to you in your capacity as Dean of the College of Cardinals to request that the College of Cardinals and the Patriarchs of the Catholic Church take collective action to respond to the dangers to Catholic faith and morals posed by the apostolic exhortation Amoris laetitia issued by Pope Francis on March 19th 2016.

This apostolic exhortation contains a number of statements that can be understood in a sense that is contrary to Catholic faith and morals. We have specified the nature and degree of the errors that could be attributed to Amoris laetitia in the accompanying document.

We request that the Cardinals and Patriarchs petition the Holy Father to condemn the errors listed in the document in a definitive and final manner, and to authoritatively state that Amoris laetitia does not require any of them to be believed or considered as possibly true.

For the convenience of the Patriarchs and members of the College of Cardinals, we shall send each of them a copy of this letter and its accompanying document.

Requesting your blessing, we are,

Yours faithfully,

 

Dr. José Tomás Alvarado

Associate Professor

Institute of Philosophy, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile

 

Rev. Fr Scot Anthony Armstrong PhD

Brisbane Oratory in formation

 

Rev. Claude Barthe

 

Rev. Ray Blake

Parish priest of the diocese of Arundel and Brighton

 

Fr. Louis-Marie de Blignières FSVF

Doctor of Philosophy

 

Dr. Philip Blosser

Professor of Philosophy

Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Archdiocese of Detroit

 

Msgr. Ignacio Barreiro Carambula, STD, JD

Chaplain and Faculty Member of the Roman Forum

 

Rev. Fr Thomas Crean OP, STD

Holy Cross parish, Leicester

 

 

Fr. Albert-Marie Crignion FSVF

Doctor designatus of Theology

 

Roberto de Mattei

Professor of the History of Christianity, European University of Rome

 

Cyrille Dounot JCL

Professor of Law the University of Auvergne, licencié en droit canonique,

Ecclesiastical advocate, archdiocese of Lyon

 

Fr Neil Feguson OP, MA, BD

Lecturer in sacred Scripture, Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford

 

Dr Alan Fimister STL, PhD

Assistant Professor of Theology, St John Vianney Seminary, archdiocese of Denver

 

Luke Gormally

Director Emeritus, The Linacre Centre for Healthcare Ethics (1981-2000)

Sometime Research Professor, Ave Maria School of Law, Ann Arbor, Michigan (2001-2007)

Ordinary Member, The Pontifical Academy for Life

 

Carlos A. Casanova Guerra

Doctor of Philosophy, Full Professor of Universidad Santo Tomás, Santiago de Chile

 

Rev. Brian W. Harrison OS, MA, STD

Associate Professor of Theology (retired), Pontifical Catholic University of Puerto Rico; Scholar in-Residence, Oblates of Wisdom Study Center, St. Louis, Missouri; Chaplain, St. Mary of Victories Chapel, St. Louis, Missouri:

 

Rev. Simon Henry BA. (Hons), MA

Parish priest of the archdiocese of Liverpool

 

Rev. John Hunwicke

Former Senior Research Fellow, Pusey House, Oxford; Priest of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham

 

Peter A. Kwasniewski PhD, Philosophy

Professor, Wyoming Catholic College

 

Dr. John R. T. Lamont, STL, D. Phil

 

Fr. Serafino M. Lanzetta, PhD

Lecturer in Dogmatic Theology, Theological Faculty of Lugano, Switzerland

Priest in charge of St Mary’s, Gosport, in the diocese of Portsmouth

 

Dr Anthony McCarthy,

Visiting Lecturer in Moral Philosophy at the International Theological Institute, Austria

 

Rev. Stephen Morgan D. Phil (Oxon).

Lecturer & Tutor in Theology, Maryvale Higher Institute of Religious Sciences

 

Don Alfredo Morselli STL

Parish priest of the archdiocese of Bologna

 

Rev. Richard A. Munkelt PhD (Philosophy)

Chaplain and Faculty Member, Roman Forum

 

Fr Aidan Nichols OP, PhD

Formerly John Paul II Lecturer in Roman Catholic Theology, University of Oxford,

Prior of the Convent of St Michael, Cambridge

 

 

 

 

Fr. Robert Nortz MMA, STL

Director of Studies, Monastery of the Most Holy Trinity, Massachusetts (Maronite)

 

Rev. John Osman MA, STL

Parish priest in the archdiocese of Birmingham, former Catholic chaplain to the University of Cambridge

 

Christopher D. Owens, STL. (Cand.)

Adjunct Instructor, Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies, St. John’s University (NYC)

Director, St. Albert the Great Center for Scholastic Studies

 

Rev David Palmer MA

Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham

Chair of Marriage and Family Life Commission, Diocese of Nottingham

 

Dr Paolo Pasqualucci

Professor of Philosophy (retired), University of Perugia

 

Dr Claudio Pierantoni

Professor of Medieval Philosophy in the Philosophy Faculty of the University of Chile

Former Professor of Church History and Patrology at the Faculty of Theology of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Member of the International Association of Patristic Studies

 

Fr Anthony Pillari JCL (Cand.)

Priest of the archdiocese of San Antonio, chaplain to Carmelite nuns

 

Prof. Enrico Maria Radaelli

International Science and Commonsense Association (ISCA)

Department of Metaphysics of Beauty and Philosophy of Arts, Research Director

 

Dr John C. Rao D.Phil. (Oxford)

Associate Professor of History, St. John’s University (NYC)

Chairman, Roman Forum

 

Fr. Réginald-Marie Rivoire FSVF

Doctor designatus of canon law

 

Rt. Rev. Giovanni Scalese CRSP, SThL, DPhil

Ordinary of Afghanistan

 

Dr Joseph Shaw

Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at St Benet’s Hall, Oxford University

 

Dr Anna M. Silvas FAHA,

Adjunct research fellow, University of New England, NSW, Australia.

 

Michael G. Sirilla, PhD

Professor of Systematic and Dogmatic Theology, Franciscan University of Steubenville

 

Professor Dr Thomas Stark

Phil.-Theol. Hochschule Benedikt XVI, Heiligenkreuz

 

Rev. Glen Tattersall

Parish Priest, Parish of Bl. John Henry Newman, archdiocese of Melbourne, Rector, St Aloysius’ Church

 

Giovanni Turco

Professor of the Philosophy of Public Law, University of Udine

 

Fr Edmund Waldstein O. Cist.

Vice-Rector of the Leopoldinum seminary and lecturer in moral theology at the Phil.-Theol., Hochschule Benedikt XVI, Heiligenkreuz

 

 

 

Nicolas Warembourg

Professeur agrégé des facultés de droit

Ecole de Droit de la Sorbonne – Université Paris 1

 

 

The Apostolic Exhortation Amoris laetitia: a theological critique

https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=11324

OnePeter5

Originally published on the website of The Australian

The apostolic exhortation Amoris laetitia, issued by Pope Francis on March 19th 2016 and addressed to bishops, priests, deacons, consecrated persons, Christian married couples, and all the lay faithful, has caused grief and confusion to many Catholics on account of its apparent disagreement with a number of teachings of the Catholic Church on faith and morals. This situation poses a grave danger to souls. Since, as St. Thomas Aquinas teaches, inferiors are bound to correct their superiors publicly when there is an imminent danger to the faith (Summa Theologiae, IIa IIae q. 33 a. 4 ad 2; a. 7 co.), and the Catholic faithful have the right and at times the duty, in keeping with their knowledge, competence, and position, to make known their views on matters which concern the good of the Church (Latin Code of Canon Law, Can. 212, §3), Catholic theologians have a strict duty to speak out against the apparent errors in the document. This statement on Amoris laetitia is intended to fulfil that duty, and to assist the hierarchy of the Church in addressing this situation.

 

The authority of Amoris laetitia

The official character of Amoris laetitia enables it to pose a grave danger to the faith and morals of Catholics. Although an apostolic exhortation pertains normally or principally to the purely pastoral governing power, nevertheless, on account of the inter-connection of the powers of teaching and of government, it also pertains indirectly to the magisterial power. It can also contain directly magisterial passages, which are then clearly indicated as being such.

This was the case for previous apostolic exhortations such as Evangelii nuntiandi, Familiaris consortio, and Reconciliatio et paenitentia.

There is no obstacle as such to the Pope’s using an apostolic exhortation to teach infallibly on faith and morals, but no infallible teaching is contained in Amoris laetitia, since none of its statements satisfy the strict requirements for an infallible definition. It is thus a non-infallible exercise of the papal magisterium.

Some commentators have asserted that the document does not contain magisterial teaching as such, but only the personal reflections of the Pope on the subjects it addresses. This assertion if true would not remove the danger to faith and morals posed by the document. If the Supreme Pontiff expresses a personal opinion in a magisterial document, this expression of opinion implicitly presents the opinion in question as one that it is legitimate for Catholics to hold. As a result, many Catholics will come to believe that the opinion is indeed compatible with Catholic faith and morals. Some Catholics out of respect for a judgment expressed by the Supreme Pontiff will come to believe that the opinion is not only permissible but true. If the opinion in question is not in fact compatible with Catholic faith or morals, these Catholics will thus reject the faith and moral teaching of the Catholic Church as it applies to this opinion. If the opinion relates to questions of morals, the practical result for the actions of Catholics will be the same whether they come to hold that the opinion is legitimate or actually true. An opinion on moral questions that is in truth legitimate for the Supreme Pontiff to hold is one that it is legitimate for Catholics to follow. Belief in the legitimacy of a moral position will thus lead Catholics to believe that it is legitimate to act as if it is true. If there is a strong motivation to act in this way, as there is with the questions being addressed here for the faithful to whose situations these questions are pertinent, most Catholics will act accordingly. This is an important factor in an evaluation of Amoris laetitia, because that document addresses concrete moral questions.

It is however not the case that Amoris laetitia is intended to do no more than express the personal views of the Pope. The document contains statements about the personal positions of the current Holy Father, but such statements are not incompatible with these positions being presented as teachings of the Church by the document. Much of the document consists of straightforward assertoric and imperative statements that make no reference to the personal views of the Holy Father, and that thus have the form of magisterial teachings. This form will cause Catholics to believe that these statements are not simply permissible, but are teachings of the authentic magisterium which call for religious submission of mind and will; teachings to which they must yield not a respectful silence accompanied by inner disagreement, but actual inner assent.1

Note 1. Cf. Lucien Choupin, Valeur des décisions doctrinales et disciplinaires du Saint-Siège, 2nd ed. (Paris: Beauchesne, 1913), pp. 52-55; and A.-M. Aubry, Obéir ou assentir? De la « soumission religieuse » au magistère simplement authentique, Paris, DDB, collection « Sed Contra », 2015.

 

The dangers of Amoris laetitia

The following analysis does not deny or question the personal faith of Pope Francis. It is not justifiable or legitimate to deny the faith of any author on the basis of a single text, and this is especially true in the case of the Supreme Pontiff. There are further reasons why the text of Amoris laetitia cannot be used as a sufficient reason for holding that the Pope has fallen into heresy. The document is extremely long, and it is probable that much of its original text was produced by an author or authors who are not Pope Francis, as is normal with papal documents. Those statements in it that on the face of them contradict the faith could be due to simple error on Pope Francis’s part, rather than to a voluntary rejection of the faith.

 

 

 

When it comes to the document itself, however, there is no doubt that it constitutes a grave danger to Catholic faith and morals. It contains many statements whose vagueness or ambiguity permit interpretations that are contrary to faith or morals, or that suggest a claim that is contrary to faith and morals without actually stating it. It also contains statements whose natural meaning would seem to be contrary to faith or morals.

The statements made by Amoris laetitia are not expressed with scientific accuracy. This can be advantageous for the very small proportion of Catholics who have a scientific training in theology, because such Catholics will be able to discern that the assertions of Amoris laetitia do not demand their religious submission of mind and will, or even a respectful silence in regard to them. Accurate formulation and proper legal form are needed in order to make a magisterial utterance binding in this fashion, and these are for the most part lacking in the document. It is however harmful for the vast majority of Catholics who do not have a theological training and are not well informed about Catholic teachings on the topics that the apostolic exhortation discusses. The lack of precision in the document’s statements makes it easier to interpret them as contradicting the real teachings of the Catholic Church and of divine revelation, and as justifying or requiring the abandonment of these teachings by Catholics in theory and in practice. Some cardinals, bishops, and priests, betraying their duty to Jesus Christ and to the care of souls, are already offering interpretations of this sort.

The problem with Amoris laetitia is not that it has imposed legally binding rules that are intrinsically unjust or authoritatively taught binding teachings that are false. The document does not have the authority to promulgate unjust laws or to require assent to false teachings, because the Pope does not have the power to do these things. The problem with the document

is that it can mislead Catholics into believing what is false and doing what is forbidden by divine law. The document is formulated in terms that are not legally or theologically exact, but this does not matter for the evaluation of its contents, because the most precise formulation cannot give legal and doctrinal status to decrees that are contrary to divine law and divine revelation. What is important about the document is the damaging effect it can have on the belief and moral life of Catholics. The character of this effect will be determined by the meaning that most Catholics will take it to have, not by its meaning when evaluated by precise theological criteria, and it is this meaning that will be addressed here. The propositions of Amoris laetitia that require censure must thus be condemned in the sense that the average reader is liable to attribute to their words. The average reader here is understood to be one who is not trying to twist the words of the document in any direction, but who will take the natural or the immediate impression of the meaning of the words to be correct.

It is acknowledged that some of the censured propositions are contradicted elsewhere in the document, and that Amoris laetitia contains many valuable teachings. Some of the passages of Amoris laetitia make an important contribution to the defence and preaching of the faith.

The criticism of Amoris laetitia offered here permits these valuable elements to have their true effect, by distinguishing them from the problematic elements in the document and neutralising the threat to the faith posed by them.

For the sake of theological clarity and justice, this criticism of the harmful parts of Amoris laetitia will take the form of a theological censure of the individual passages that are deficient.

These censures are to be understood in the sense traditionally held by the Church, 2 and are applied to the passages prout iacent, as they lie. The propositions censured are so damaging that a complete listing of the censures that apply to them is not attempted. Most if not all of them fall under the censures of aequivoca, ambigua, obscura, praesumptuosa, anxia, dubia, captiosa, male sonans, piarum aurium offensiva, as well as the ones listed. The censures list i) the censures that bear upon the content of the statements censured, and ii) those that bear upon the damaging effects of the statements. The censures are not intended to be an exhaustive list of the errors that Amoris laetitia on a plausible reading contains; they seek to identify the worst threats to Catholic faith and morals in the document. The propositions censured are divided into those that are heretical and those that fall under a lesser censure.

Heretical propositions, censured as ‘haeretica’, are ones that contradict propositions that are contained in divine revelation and are defined with a solemn judgment as divinely revealed truths either by the Roman Pontiff when he speaks ‘ex cathedra,’ or by the College of Bishops gathered in council, or infallibly proposed for belief by the ordinary and universal

Magisterium. The propositions that fall under a lesser censure than heresy are included as posing an especially grave danger to faith and morals.

The censures of these propositions are not censures of administrative, legislative or doctrinal acts of the Supreme Pontiff, since the propositions censured do not and cannot constitute such acts. The censures are the subject of a filial request to the Supreme Pontiff, which asks him to make a definitive and final juridical and doctrinal act condemning the propositions censured.

Finally, some of the theologians who are signatories to this letter reserve the right to make minor adjustments to some of the censures attached to some of the propositions: their signatures should be taken as indicating their belief that all the propositions should be censured, and a general agreement with the censures here proposed.

 

Note 2. See H. Quilliet, ‘Censures doctrinales’, DTC II, 2101-2113, and the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, ‘Doctrinal commentary on the concluding formula of the Professio fidei’, June29th, 1998.

 

Theological censures of propositions drawn from the Apostolic Exhortation Amoris laetitia

A). Heretical propositions.

1). AL 83: ‘The Church … firmly rejects the death penalty’.

 

 

 

If understood as meaning that the death penalty is always and everywhere unjust in itself and therefore cannot ever be rightly inflicted by the state:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Perniciosa.

Gen. 9:6 3: “Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man shall his blood be shed; for God made man in his own image.”

See also: Lev. 20-1; Deut. 13, 21-22; Matt. 15:4; Mk. 7:10; Jn. 19:11; Rom. 13:4; Heb. 10:28; Innocent I, Letter to Exsuperius, PL 120: 499A-B; Innocent III, Profession of Faith prescribed for the Waldensians, DH 795 4; Pius V, Catechism of the Council of Trent, commentary on the 5th commandment; Pope Pius XII, Address to the First International Congress of Histopathology of the Nervous System, AAS 44 (1952): 787; John Paul II, Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2267.

 

Note 3. Scriptural references are taken from the Vulgate or from the neo-Vulgate.

Note 4. All references to Denzinger are taken from the 43rd edition.

 

2). AL 156: ‘Every form of sexual submission must be clearly rejected.’

 

If understood not simply as denying that a wife owes servile obedience to her husband or that the husband has authority over his wife that is the same as parental authority, but as also denying that the husband has any form of authority over his wife, or as denying that the wife has any duty to obey the legitimate commands of her husband in virtue of his authority as husband:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Prava, perniciosa.

Eph. 5:24: “As the Church is subject to Christ, so also let wives be to their husbands in all things.”

See also: 1 Cor. 11:3; Col. 3:18; Tit. 2:3-5; 1 Pet. 3:1-5; Pius V, Catechism of the Council of Trent, commentary on the sacrament of matrimony; Leo XIII, Arcanum, ASS 12 (1879): 389; Pius XI, Casti connubii, AAS 22 (1930): 549 (DH 3708-09); John XXIII, Ad Petri cathedram, AAS 51 (1959): 509-10.

 

3). AL 159: ‘Saint Paul recommended virginity because he expected Jesus’ imminent return and he wanted everyone to concentrate only on spreading the Gospel: “the appointed time has grown very short” (1 Cor 7:29) … Rather than speak absolutely of the superiority of virginity, it should be enough to point out that the different states of life complement one another, and consequently that some can be more perfect in one way and others in another.’

 

3. Scriptural references are taken from the Vulgate or from the neo-Vulgate.

4. All references to Denzinger are taken from the 43rd edition.

 

Understood as denying that a virginal state of life consecrated to Christ is superior considered in itself to the state of Christian marriage:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Perniciosa, suspensiva gravis resolutionis.

Council of Trent, Session 24, canon 10: “If anyone says that the married state surpasses that of virginity or celibacy, and that it is not better and more blessed to remain in virginity or celibacy than to be united in matrimony, let him be anathema” (DH 1810).

See also: Mt. 19: 12, 21; 1 Cor. 7:7-8, 38; 2 Thess. 2:1-2; Apoc. 14:4; Council of Florence, Decree for the Jacobites, DH 1353; Pius X, Response of the Biblical Commission, DH 3629; Pius XII Sacra virginitas, AAS 46 (1954): 174; 2nd Vatican Council, Decree Optatam totius, 10.

 

4). AL 295: ‘Saint John Paul II proposed the so-called “law of gradualness” in the knowledge that the human being “knows, loves and accomplishes moral good by different stages of growth”.

This is not a “gradualness of law” but rather a gradualness in the prudential exercise of free acts on the part of subjects who are not in a position to understand, appreciate, or fully carry out the objective demands of the law.’

AL 301: ‘It is [sic] can no longer simply be said that all those in any “irregular” situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace. More is involved here than mere ignorance of the rule. A subject may know full well the rule, yet have great difficulty in understanding “its inherent values”, or be in a concrete situation which does not allow him or her to act differently and decide otherwise without further sin.’

 

Understood as meaning that a justified person has not the strength with God’s grace to carry out the objective demands of the divine law, as though any of the commandments of God are impossible for the justified; or as meaning that God’s grace, when it produces justification in an individual, does not invariably and of its nature produce conversion from all serious sin, or is not sufficient for conversion from all serious sin:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Impia, blasphema.

 

 

Council of Trent, session 6, canon 18: “If anyone says that the commandments of God are impossible to observe even for a man who is justified and established in grace, let him be anathema” (DH 1568).

See also: Gen. 4:7; Deut. 30:11-19; Ecclesiasticus 15: 11-22; Mk. 8:38; Lk. 9:26; Heb. 10:26-29; 1 Jn. 5:17; Zosimus, 15th (or 16th) Synod of Carthage, canon 3 on grace, DH 225; Felix III, 2nd Synod of Orange, DH 397; Council of Trent, Session 5, canon 5; Session 6, canons 18-20, 22, 27 and 29; Pius V, Bull Ex omnibus afflictionibus, On the errors of Michael du Bay, 54, (DH 1954); Innocent X, Constitution Cum occasione, On the errors of Cornelius Jansen, 1 (DH 2001); Clement XI, Constitution Unigenitus, On the errors of Pasquier Quesnel, 71 (DH 2471); John Paul II, Apostolic Exhortation Reconciliatio et paenitentia 17: AAS 77 (1985): 222; Veritatis splendor 65-70: AAS 85 (1993): 1185-89 (DH 4964-67).

 

5). AL 297: ‘No one can be condemned for ever, because that is not the logic of the Gospel!’

 

If understood as meaning that no human being can or will be condemned to eternal punishment in hell:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Scandalosa, perniciosa.

Matt. 25: 46: “These shall go into everlasting punishment: but the just, into life everlasting”

See also: Mt. 7:22-23; Lk. 16: 26; Jn. 17:12; Apoc. 20:10; 16th Synod of Toledo (DH 574); 4th Lateran Council, DH 801; Benedict XII, Constitution Benedictus Deus, DH 1002; Council of Florence, decree Laetentur caeli, DH 1306; John Paul II, Letter of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Recentiores episcoporum, AAS 71 (1979): 941; Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1033-37.

 

6). AL 299: ‘I am in agreement with the many Synod Fathers who observed that “the baptized who are divorced and civilly remarried need to be more fully integrated into Christian communities in the variety of ways possible, while avoiding any occasion of scandal. The logic of integration is the key to their pastoral care, a care which would allow them not only to realize that they belong to the Church as the body of Christ, but also to know that they can have a joyful and fruitful experience in it. They are baptized; they are brothers and sisters; the Holy Spirit pours into their hearts gifts and talents for the good of all. … Such persons need to feel not as excommunicated members of the Church, but instead as living members, able to live and grow in the Church and experience her as a mother who welcomes them always, who takes care of them with affection and encourages them along the path of life and the Gospel”.’

 

If understood as meaning that the divorced and civilly remarried who choose their situation with full knowledge and full consent of the will are not in a state of serious sin, and that they can receive sanctifying grace and grow in charity:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Scandalosa, prava, perversa.

Mk. 10:11-12: “Whosoever shall put away his wife and marry another, committeth adultery against her. And if the wife shall put away her husband, and be married to another, she committeth adultery”.

See also: Ex. 20:14; Mt. 5:32, 19:9; Lk. 16:18; 1 Cor. 7: 10-11; Heb. 10:26-29; Council of Trent, Session 6, canons 19-21, 27 (DH 1569-71, 1577); Session 24, canons 5 and 7 (DH 1805, 1807); Innocent XI, Condemned propositions of the ‘Laxists’, 62-63 (DH 2162-63); Alexander VIII, Decree of the Holy Office on ‘Philosophical Sin’, DH 2291; John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 65-70: AAS 85 (1993): 1185-89 (DH 4964-67).

 

7). AL 301: ‘It is [sic] can no longer simply be said that all those in any “irregular” situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace. More is involved here than mere ignorance of the rule. A subject may know full well the rule, yet have great difficulty in understanding “its inherent values”, or be in a concrete situation which does not allow him or her to act differently and decide otherwise without further sin.’

 

Understood as meaning that a Catholic believer can have full knowledge of a divine law and voluntarily choose to break it in a serious matter, but not be in a state of mortal sin as a result of this action:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Prava, perversa.

Council of Trent, session 6, canon 20: “If anyone says that a justified man, however perfect he may be, is not bound to observe the commandments of God and of the Church but is bound only to believe, as if the Gospel were merely an absolute promise of eternal life without the condition that the commandments be observed, let him be anathema” (DH 1570).

See also: Mk. 8:38; Lk. 9:26; Heb. 10:26-29; 1 Jn. 5:17; Council of Trent, session 6, canons 19 and 27; Clement XI, Constitution Unigenitus, On the errors of Pasquier Quesnel, 71 (DH 2471); John Paul II, Apostolic Exhortation Reconciliatio et paenitentia 17: AAS 77 (1985): 222; Veritatis splendor, 65-70: AAS 85 (1993): 1185-89 (DH 4964-67).

 

8). AL 301: ‘It is [sic] can no longer simply be said that all those in any “irregular” situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace. More is involved here than mere ignorance of the rule.

 

 

 

A subject may know full well the rule, yet have great difficulty in understanding its inherent values, or be in a concrete situation which does not allow him or her to act differently and decide otherwise without further sin.’

 

Understood as saying that a person with full knowledge of a divine law can sin by choosing to obey that law:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Prava, perversa.

Ps. 18:8: “The law of the Lord is unspotted, converting souls.”

See also: Ecclesiasticus 15:21; Council of Trent, session 6, canon 20; Clement XI, Constitution Unigenitus, On the errors of Pasquier Quesnel, 71 (DH 2471); Leo XIII, Libertas praestantissimum, ASS 20 (1887-88): 598 (DH 3248); John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 40: AAS 85 (1993): 1165 (DH 4953).

 

9). AL 303: Conscience can do more than recognize that a given situation does not correspond objectively to the overall demands of the Gospel. It can also recognize with sincerity and honesty what for now is the most generous response which can be given to God, and come to see with a certain moral security that it is what God himself is asking amid the concrete complexity of one’s limits, while yet not fully the objective ideal.’

 

Understood as meaning that conscience can truly judge that actions condemned by the Gospel, and in particular, sexual acts between Catholics who have civilly remarried following divorce, can sometimes be morally right or requested or commanded by God:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Scandalosa, prava, perversa, perniciosa, impia, blasphema.

Council of Trent, session 6, canon 21: “If anyone says that Jesus Christ was given by God to men as a redeemer in whom they are to trust but not also as a lawgiver whom they are bound to obey, let him be anathema” (DH 1571).

Council of Trent, session 24, canon 2: “If anyone says that it is lawful for Christians to have several wives at the same time, and that this is not forbidden by any divine law, let him be anathema” (DH 1802).

Council of Trent, session 24, canon 5: “If anyone says that the marriage bond can be dissolved because of heresy or difficulties in cohabitation or because of the wilful absence of one of the spouses, let him be anathema” (DH 1805)

Council of Trent, session 24, canon 7: “If anyone says that the Church is in error for having taught and for still teaching that in accordance with the evangelical and apostolic doctrine, the marriage bond cannot be dissolved because of adultery on the part of one of the spouses and that neither of the two, not even the innocent one who has given no cause for infidelity, can contract another marriage during the lifetime of the other, and that the husband who dismisses an adulterous wife and marries again and the wife who dismisses and adulterous husband and married again are both guilty of adultery, let him be anathema” (DH 1807).

See also: Ps. 5:5; Ps. 18:8-9; Ecclesiasticus 15:21; Heb. 10:26-29; Jas. 1:13; 1 Jn. 3:7; Innocent XI, Condemned propositions of the ‘Laxists’, 62-63 (DH 2162-63); Clement XI, Constitution Unigenitus, On the errors of Pasquier Quesnel, 71 (DH 2471); Leo XIII, encyclical letter Libertas praestantissimum, ASS 20 (1887-88): 598 (DH 3248); Pius XII, Decree of the Holy Office on situation ethics, DH 3918; 2nd Vatican Council, Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et spes, 16; John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 54: AAS 85 (1993): 1177; Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1786-87.

 

10). AL 304: ‘I earnestly ask that we always recall a teaching of Saint Thomas Aquinas and learn to incorporate it in our pastoral discernment: “Although there is necessity in the general principles, the more we descend to matters of detail, the more frequently we encounter defects… In matters of action, truth or practical rectitude is not the same for all, as to matters of detail, but only as to the general principles; and where there is the same rectitude in matters of detail, it is not equally known to all… The principle will be found to fail, according as we descend further into detail”. It is true that general rules set forth a good which can never be disregarded or neglected, but in their formulation they cannot provide absolutely for all particular situations.’

 

Understood as meaning that moral principles and moral truths contained in divine revelation and in the natural law do not include negative prohibitions that absolutely forbid particular kinds of action under any and all circumstances:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Scandalosa, prava, perversa.

John Paul II, Veritatis splendor 115: “Each of us knows how important is the teaching which represents the central theme of this Encyclical and which is today being restated with the authority of the Successor of Peter. Each of us can see the seriousness of what is involved, not only for individuals but also for the whole of society, with the reaffirmation of the universality and immutability of the moral commandments, particularly those which prohibit always and without exception intrinsically evil acts” (DH 4971).

See also: Rom. 3:8; 1 Cor. 6: 9-10; Gal. 5: 19-21; Apoc. 22:15; 4th Lateran Council, chapter 22 (DH 815); Council of Constance, Bull Inter cunctas, 14 (DH 1254); Paul VI, Humanae vitae, 14: AAS 60 (1968) 490-91. John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 83: AAS 85 (1993): 1199 (DH 4970).

 

 

 

 

11). AL 308: I understand those who prefer a more rigorous pastoral care which leaves no room for confusion. But I sincerely believe that Jesus wants a Church attentive to the goodness which the Holy Spirit sows in the midst of human weakness, a Mother who, while clearly expressing her objective teaching, “always does what good she can, even if in the process, her shoes get soiled by the mud of the street”.’

 

If understood as meaning that Our Lord Jesus Christ wills that the Church abandon her perennial discipline of refusing the Eucharist to the divorced and remarried and of refusing absolution to the divorced and remarried who do not express contrition for their state of life and a firm purpose of amendment with regard to it:

i). Haeretica, sacrae Scripturae contraria.

ii). Scandalosa, prava, perversa, impia, blasphema.

1 Cor. 11:27: “Whosoever shall eat this bread, or drink the chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and of the blood of the Lord.

Familiaris consortio, 84: “Reconciliation in the sacrament of Penance, which would open the way to the Eucharist, can only be granted to those who, repenting of having broken the sign of the Covenant and of fidelity to Christ, are sincerely ready to undertake a way of life that is no longer in contradiction to the indissolubility of marriage. This means, in practice, that when, for serious reasons, such as for example the children’s upbringing, a man and a woman cannot satisfy the obligation to separate, they ‘take on themselves the duty to live in complete continence, that is, by abstinence from the acts proper to married couples’.”

2nd Lateran Council, canon 20: “Because there is one thing that conspicuously causes great disturbance to holy Church, namely false penance, we warn our brothers in the episcopate, and priests, not to allow the souls of the laity to be deceived or dragged off to hell by false penances. It is certain that a penance is false when many sins are disregarded and a penance is performed for one only, or when it is done for one sin in such a way that the penitent does not renounce another” (DH 717).

See also: Mt. 7:6; Mt. 22: 11-13; 1 Cor. 11:28-30; Heb. 13:8; Council of Trent, session 14, Decree on Penance, cap. 4; Council of Trent, session 13, Decree on the most holy Eucharist (DH 1646-47)); Innocent XI, Condemned propositions of the ‘Laxists’, 60-63 (DH 2160-63); John Paul II, Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1385, 1451, 1490

 

B. Propositions falling under lesser censures

12). AL 295: ‘Saint John Paul II proposed the so-called “law of gradualness” in the knowledge that the human being “knows, loves and accomplishes moral good by different stages of growth”.

This is not a “gradualness of law” but rather a gradualness in the prudential exercise of free acts on the part of subjects who are not in a position to understand, appreciate, or fully carry out the objective demands of the law.’

 

If understood as meaning that free acts that do not fully carry out the objective demands of divine law can be morally good:

i). Erronea in fide.

ii). Scandalosa, prava.

1 Jn. 3: 4: “Whosoever committeth sin, committeth also iniquity; and sin is iniquity.”

See also: Leo XIII, Libertas praestantissimum, ASS 20 (1887-88): 598 (DH 3248); John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 40: AAS 85 (1993): 1165 (DH 4953).

 

13). AL 296: “There are two ways of thinking which recur throughout the Church’s history: casting off and reinstating. The Church’s way, from the time of the Council of Jerusalem, has always been the way of Jesus, the way of mercy and reinstatement. The way of the Church is not to condemn anyone for ever.”

 

AL 297: ‘No one can be condemned for ever, because that is not the logic of the Gospel!’

 

Understood as meaning that in circumstances where an offender does not cease to commit an offence the Church does not have the power or the right to inflict punishments or condemnations without later remitting them or lifting them, or that the Church does not have the power or the right to condemn and anathematise individuals after their death:

i). Erronea in fide.

ii). Scandalosa, perniciosa, derogans praxi sive usui et disciplinae Ecclesiae.

1983 Code of Canon Law, can. 1358: “The remission of a censure cannot be granted except to an offender whose contempt has been purged”.

3rd Council of Constantinople, Condemnation of the Monothelites and of Pope Honorius I: “As to these self-same men whose impious teachings we have rejected, we have also judged it necessary to banish their names from the holy Church of God, that is, the name of Sergius, who began to write about this impious doctrine, of Cyrus of Alexandria, of Pyrrhus, of Paul and of Peter and of those who have presided on the throne of this God-protected city, and the same for those who have been like-minded. Then also (the name) of Theodore who was bishop of Pharan.

 

 

 

All these afore-named persons were mentioned by Agatho, the most holy and thrice blessed pope of elder Rome, in his letter to the . . . emperor, and rejected by him as having thought in a way contrary to our orthodox faith; and we determine that they are also subject to anathema. Along with these we have seen fit to banish from the holy Church of God and to anathematize also Honorius, the former pope of the elder Rome” (DH 550).

See also: 2nd Council of Constantinople, canons 11-12; Lateran Synod, canon 18 (DH 518-20); Leo II, letter Regi regum, DH 563; 4th Council of Constantinople, canon 11; Council of Florence, Decree for the Jacobites DH 1339-1346; Benedict XV, 1917 Code of Canon Law, canons 855, 2214, 2241:1 and 2257; John Paul II, 1983 Code of Canon Law, canons 915 and

1311; Code of Canon Law for Eastern Churches, canon 1424:1.

 

14). AL 298: ‘The divorced who have entered a new union, for example, can find themselves in a variety of situations, which should not be pigeonholed or fit into overly rigid classifications leaving no room for a suitable personal and pastoral discernment. One thing is a second union consolidated over time, with new children, proven fidelity, generous self-giving, Christian commitment, a consciousness of its irregularity and of the great difficulty of going back without feeling in conscience that one would fall into new sins.’

 

If understood as meaning that persons who are civilly married to someone other than their true spouse can show Christian virtue by being sexually faithful to their civil partner:

i). Erronea in fide.

ii). Scandalosa.

1 Cor. 7:10-11: “To them that are married, not I but the Lord commandeth, that the wife depart not from her husband; and if she depart, that she remain unmarried, or be reconciled to her husband. And let not the husband put away his wife.”

See also: Gen. 2: 21; Mal. 2:15-16; Mt. 5:32, 19:9; Mk. 10:11-12; Lk. 16:18; Heb. 13:4; Letter Quam laudabiliter of Leo I, DH 283; Letter Regressus ad nos of Leo I, DH 311-14; Letter Gaudemus in Domino of Innocent III, DH 777-79; 2nd Council of Lyons, Profession of Faith of Emperor Michael Palaeologus (DH 860); Council of Trent, Session 24 canons 5, 7; Pius Vl,

Rescript. ad Episc. Agriens., 11th July 1789; Arcanum, ASS 12 (1879-80): 388-94; Pius XI, Casti connubii, AAS 22 (1930): 546-50 (cf. Dz 3706-10); John Paul II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris consortio, 19, 80-81, 84: AAS 74 (1982) 92-149; Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1643-49.

 

15). AL 298: ‘The Church acknowledges situations “where, for serious reasons, such as the children’s upbringing, a man and woman cannot satisfy the obligation to separate” [footnote 329]. In such situations, many people, knowing and accepting the possibility of living “as brothers and sisters” which the Church offers them, point out that if certain expressions of intimacy are lacking, “it often happens that faithfulness is endangered and the good of the children suffers”.’ {N.B. The last clause in double quotation marks misleadingly applies to divorced and civilly married couples a statement of Vatican Council II, Gaudium et Spes, 51, that refers only to validly married couples.}

 

Understood as endorsing claims that divorced and civilly remarried couples have an obligation of sexual faithfulness to each other rather than to their true spouses, or that their living ‘as brother and sister’ could be either a culpable occasion of sin against that supposed obligation, or a culpable cause of harm to their children:

i) Erronea in fide.

ii) Scandalosa, prava, perversa.

Ecclesiasticus 15:21: “He hath commanded no man to do wickedly, and he hath given no man licence to sin.”

See also: Rom. 3:8, 8: 28; 1 Thess. 4:7; Jas. 1:13-14; John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 79-83: AAS 85 (1993): 1197-99 (cf. DH 4969-70).

 

16). AL 300: ‘Since “the degree of responsibility is not equal in all cases”, the consequences or effects of a rule need not necessarily always be the same [footnote 336]. This is also the case with regard to sacramental discipline, since discernment can recognize that in a particular situation no grave fault exists.’

 

AL 305: ‘Because of forms of conditioning and mitigating factors, it is possible that in an objective situation of sin – which may not be subjectively culpable, or fully such – a person can be living in God’s grace, can love and can also grow in the life of grace and charity, while receiving the Church’s help to this end [footnote 351]. In certain cases, this can include the help of the sacraments. Hence, “I want to remind priests that the confessional must not be a torture chamber, but rather an encounter with the Lord’s mercy”. I would also point out that the Eucharist “is not a prize for the perfect, but a powerful medicine and nourishment for the weak”‘.’

 

Understood as saying that absence of grave fault due to diminished responsibility can permit admission to the Eucharist in the cases of divorced and civilly remarried persons who do not separate, nor undertake to live in perfect continence, but remain in an objective state of adultery and bigamy:

i). Erronea in fide, falsa.

ii). Scandalosa.

 

 

 

John Paul II, Familiaris consortio 84: “The Church reaffirms her practice, which is based upon Sacred Scripture, of not admitting to Eucharistic Communion divorced persons who have remarried. They are unable to be admitted thereto from the fact that their state and condition of life objectively contradict that union of love between Christ and the Church which is signified and effected by the Eucharist. Besides this, there is another special pastoral reason: if these people were admitted to the Eucharist, the faithful would be led into error and confusion regarding the Church’s teaching about the indissolubility of marriage.

Reconciliation in the sacrament of Penance, which would open the way to the Eucharist, can only be granted to those who, repenting of having broken the sign of the Covenant and of fidelity to Christ, are sincerely ready to undertake a way of life that is no longer in contradiction to the indissolubility of marriage. This means, in practice, that when, for serious reasons, such as for example the children’s upbringing, a man and a woman cannot satisfy the obligation to separate, they ‘take on themselves the duty to live in complete continence, that is, by abstinence from the acts proper to married couples’.”

1 Jn. 2:20: “You have the unction from the Holy One, and know all things”.

See also Ez. 3:17; Mt. 28:20; 1 Cor. 11:27-29; Eph. 5:30-32; 2nd Lateran Council, DH 717; Paul V, Rituale Romanum, 49; Benedict XIV, Confirmation of the Synod of the Maronites; Encyclical letter Ex omnibus; Benedict XV, 1917 Code of Canon Law, canon 855; John Paul II, 1983 Code of Canon Law, canon 915; Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Letter to

bishops of the Catholic Church concerning the reception of Eucharistic communion by those faithful who after a divorce have entered a new marriage, AAS 86 (1994): 974-79; Code of Canon Law for Eastern Churches, canon 712; Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1650, 2390; Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Concerning Some Objections to the Church’s

Teaching on the Reception of Holy Communion by Divorced and Remarried Members of the Faithful, in “Documenti e Studi”, On the Pastoral Care of the Divorced and Remarried, Vatican City 1998, pp. 20-29; Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts (PCLT), “Declaration Concerning the Admission to Holy Communion of Faithful who are Divorced and Remarried“, on-line at http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/intrptxt/documents/rc_pc_intrptxt_doc_20000706_declaration_en.html; Benedict XVI, Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum caritatis 29: AAS 99 (2007), 128-29.

 

17). AL 298: ‘The divorced who have entered a new union, for example, can find themselves in a variety of situations, which should not be pigeonholed or fit into overly rigid classifications leaving no room for a suitable personal and pastoral discernment. One thing is a second union consolidated over time, with new children, proven fidelity, generous self-giving, Christian commitment, a consciousness of its irregularity and of the great difficulty of going back without feeling in conscience that one would fall into new sins.’

 

If understood as meaning that the divorced and remarried can either sin or culpably expose themselves to the occasion of sin by abstaining from sexual relations in accordance with the perennial teaching and discipline of the Church:

i). Temeraria, falsa.

ii). Scandalosa, prava, derogans praxi et disciplinae Ecclesiae.

Ecclesiasticus 15:16: “If thou wilt keep the commandments and perform acceptable fidelity for ever, they shall preserve thee.”

See also: 1 Cor. 7:11, 10:13; John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 102-03: AAS 85 (1993): 1213-14; Apostolic Exhortation, Familiaris consortio, 84, AAS 74 (1982) 92-149; Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1650; Benedict XVI, Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum caritatis 99 (2007), 128-29.

 

18). AL 298: ‘There are also the cases of those who made every effort to save their first marriage and were unjustly abandoned, or of “those who have entered into a second union for the sake of the children’s upbringing, and are sometimes subjectively certain in conscience that their previous and irreparably broken marriage had never been valid”.’

 

If understood as meaning that subjective certainty in conscience about the invalidity of a previous marriage is sufficient on its own to excuse from guilt or legal penalty those who contract a new marriage when their previous marriage is recognised as valid by the Church:

i). Temeraria, falsa.

ii). Scandalosa.

Council of Trent, Session 24, canon 12: “If anyone says that matrimonial cases do not belong to ecclesiastical judges, let him be anathema” (DH 1812).

See also: Leo XIII, Arcanum, ASS 12 (1879), 393; John Paul II, 1983 Code of Canon Law, canons 1059-60, 1085.

 

19). AL 311: ‘The teaching of moral theology should not fail to incorporate these considerations.’

 

Understood as meaning that the teaching of moral theology in the Catholic Church should present as probable or true any of the propositions censured above:

i). Falsa.

ii). Scandalosa, prava, perversa, perniciosa.

 

 

Matt. 5:19: “He therefore that shall break one of these least commandments, and shall so teach men, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven.”

See also: Is. 5:20; Mt. 28:20; 1 Tim. 6:20; Jas. 3:1; Pius IX, Bull Ineffabilis Deus, DH 2802; 1st Vatican Council, Constitution Dei Filius, cap. 4 (DH 3020); Pius X, Motu Proprio Sacrorum antistitum, DH 3541; 1st Vatican Council, Constitution Dei Filius, cap. 4 (DH 3020); Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Iusiurandum fidelitatis in suscipiendo officio nomine ecclesiae exercendo, AAS 81 (1989): 106; Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Donum veritatis, On the ecclesial vocation of the theologian, AAS 82 (1990): 1559; John Paul II, Veritatis splendor, 115-16: AAS 85 (1993): 1223-24; Benedict XVI, Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Notification on the Works of Father Jon Sobrino SJ, 2 (DH 5107).

The propositions censured above have been condemned in many previous magisterial documents. It is urgently necessary that their condemnation be repeated by the Supreme Pontiff in a definitive and final manner and that it be authoritatively stated that Amoris laetitia does not require any of them to be believed or considered as possibly true.

 


 

RELATED FILES

AMORIS LAETITIA
ON LOVE IN THE FAMILY FRANCIS, MARCH 19, 2016

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/AMORIS_LAETITIA.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 24-APOSTOLIC DECEPTION AMORIS LAETITIA
8/20 APRIL 2016

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_24-APOSTOLIC_DECEPTION_AMORIS_LAETITIA.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 27-THE CHIEF DRAFTER OF AMORIS LAETITIA AND THE ART OF KISSING
13 APRIL 2016

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_27-THE_CHIEF_DRAFTER_OF_AMORIS_LAETITIA_AND_THE_ART_OF_KISSING.doc

AMORIS LAETITIA AND THE CURRENT CRISIS IN THE CHURCH
6 JUNE 2016

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/AMORIS_LAETITIA_AND_THE_CURRENT_CRISIS_IN_THE_CHURCH.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 31-AMORIS LAETITIA-CONTINUING FALLOUT
xx JULY 2016 – To be released

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_31-AMORIS_LAETITIA-CONTINUING_FALLOUT.doc

 

ON POPE FRANCIS

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01-WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON MAUNDY THURSDAY

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01-WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_MAUNDY_THURSDAY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01A-WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON MAUNDY THURSDAY

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01A-WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_MAUNDY_THURSDAY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01B-FRANCIS LEGITIMIZES WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN AFTER VIOLATING RUBRICS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01B-FRANCIS_LEGITIMIZES_WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_AFTER_VIOLATING_RUBRIC.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01C-MAUNDY THURSDAY FOOT WASHING 4.0-MORE REACTIONS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01B-MAUNDY_THURSDAY_FOOT_WASHING_4.0-MORE_REACTIONS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01D-MAUNDY THURSDAY FOOT KISSING

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01D-MAUNDY_THURSDAY_FOOT_KISSING.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 02-MEDJUGORJE

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_02-MEDJUGORJE.doc

 

 

 

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 03-HOMOSEXUALITY THE SEX ABUSE CRISIS AND THE GAY LOBBY
http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_03-HOMOSEXUALITY_THE_SEX_ABUSE_CRISIS_AND_THE_GAY_LOBBY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 04-COMPROMISED BY NEW AGE ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_04-COMPROMISED_BY_NEW_AGE_ALTERNATIVE_MEDICINE.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 05-BAPTISM OF ALIENS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_05-BAPTISM_OF_ALIENS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 06-ENDORSEMENT OF A NEW AGE HEALER FROM INDIA?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_06-ENDORSEMENT_OF_A_NEW_AGE_HEALER_FROM_INDIA.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 08-CONSULTOR TO THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE PRACTISES NEW AGE ADVOCATES THE HERESY OF WOMEN PRIESTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_08-CONSULTOR_TO_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_PRACTISES_NEW_AGE_ADVOCATES_THE_HERESY_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 09-THE POPE UNDERGOES NEW AGE TREATMENTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_09-THE_POPE_UNDERGOES_NEW_AGE_TREATMENTS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 10-NEW AGE CONSULTOR TO THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE NOW DENIGRATES THE EUCHARIST

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_10-NEW_AGE_CONSULTOR_TO_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_NOW_DENIGRATES_THE_EUCHARIST.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 11-PRESIDENT OF THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE JOINS IN RELIGIOUS RITUAL OF NEW AGE CULT

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_11-PRESIDENT_OF_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_JOINS_IN_RELIGIOUS_RITUAL_OF_NEW_AGE_CULT.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 12-CATHOLIC CRITICISM OF ENCYCLICAL LAUDATO SI’

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_12-CATHOLIC_CRITICISM_OF_ENCYCLICAL_LAUDATO_SI’.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 13-SOME QUESTIONABLE ECCLESIAL APPOINTMENTS OF POPE FRANCIS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_13-SOME_QUESTIONABLE_ECCLESIAL_APPOINTMENTS_OF_POPE_FRANCIS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 14-A DANGEROUS POPE CHALLENGING THE CHURCH?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_14-A_DANGEROUS_POPE_CHALLENGING_THE_CHURCH.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 15-THE POPE SPEAKS ON CLIMATE CHANGE AIR POLLUTION AND A HERETICAL PRIEST EVADES PROLIFE ISSUES

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_15-THE_POPE_SPEAKS_ON_CLIMATE_CHANGE_AIR_POLLUTION_AND_A_HERETICAL_PRIEST_ EVADES _PROLIFE_ISSUES.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 16-CARDINAL DANNEELS REVEALS THAT HIS CLERICAL MAFIA STRIVED FOR BERGOGLIO AS POPE

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_16-CARDINAL_DANNEELS_REVEALS_THAT_HIS_CLERICAL_MAFIA_STRIVED_FOR_BERGOGLIO_AS_POPE.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 17-HOW WILL TRADITION VIEW POPE FRANCIS’ PAPACY?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_17-HOW_WILL_TRADITION_VIEW_POPE_FRANCIS_PAPACY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 18-CATHOLIC CRITICISM OF POPE FRANCIS’ MOTU PROPRIOS ON MARRIAGE ANNULMENT

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_18-CATHOLIC_CRITICISM_OF_POPE_FRANCIS_MOTU_PROPRIOS_ON_MARRIAGE_ANNULMENT.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 19-CRACKDOWN ON THE FRANCISCAN FRIARS OF THE IMMACULATE

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_19-CRACKDOWN_ON_THE_FRANCISCAN_FRIARS_OF_THE_IMMACULATE.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 20-ATHEIST PAPAL ADVISOR BELIEVES IN NEW AGE GODDESS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_20-ATHEIST_PAPAL_ADVISOR_BELIEVES_IN_NEW_AGE_GODDESS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 21-AWARDED 2015 PERSON OF THE YEAR BY ANTICHRISTIAN PETA

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_21-AWARDED_2015_PERSON_OF_THE_YEAR_BY_ANTICHRISTIAN_PETA.doc

 

 

 

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 22-THE CONTRACEPTION AND RABBITGATE CONTROVERSIES

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_22-THE_CONTRACEPTION_AND_RABBITGATE_CONTROVERSIES.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 23-THE LUTHERANIZATION OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_23-THE_LUTHERANIZATION_OF_THE_CATHOLIC_CHURCH.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 25-SHAME AND SCANDAL IN THE FAMILY

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_25-SHAME_AND_SCANDAL_IN_THE_FAMILY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 26-THE DECENTRALIZATION OF DOCTRINAL AUTHORITY

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_26-THE_DECENTRALIZATION_OF_DOCTRINAL_AUTHORITY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 28- QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 28-DID GERMAN PELF INFLUENCE THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_28-DID_GERMAN_PELF_INFLUENCE_THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 29-PROTESTANT ALPHA COURSE ENDORSED BY POPE FRANCIS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_29-PROTESTANT_ALPHA_COURSE_ENDORSED_BY_POPE_FRANCIS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 30-ECUMENISM WITH PROTESTANTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_30-ECUMENISM_WITH_PROTESTANTS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 32-PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR THE FAMILY UNVEILS DIABOLICAL SEX-ED PROGRAMME

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_32-PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_THE_FAMILY_UNVEILS_DIABOLICAL_SEX-ED_PROGRAMME.doc

 

A CLOSED LETTER TO POPE FRANCIS NOW OPEN-FR CONRAD SALDANHA

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/A_CLOSED_LETTER_TO_POPE_FRANCIS_NOW_OPEN-FR_CONRAD_SALDANHA.doc

AN OPEN LETTER TO POPE FRANCIS-FR GEORGE DAVID BYERS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/AN_OPEN_LETTER_TO_POPE_FRANCIS-FR_GEORGE_DAVID_BYERS.doc

AN OPEN LETTER TO POPE FRANCIS-FR RICHARD CIPOLLA

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/AN_OPEN_LETTER_TO_POPE_FRANCIS-FR_RICHARD_CIPOLLA.doc

IS POPE FRANCIS UNDERGOING TREATMENT WITH NEW AGE ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/IS_POPE_FRANCIS_UNDERGOING_TREATMENT_WITH_NEW_AGE_ALTERNATIVE_THERAPIES.doc

CARDINAL OSWALD GRACIAS INTERPRETS POPE FRANCIS PERSONAL REMARK ON HOMOSEXUALS AS CHURCH TEACHING

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/CARDINAL_OSWALD_GRACIAS_INTERPRETS_POPE_FRANCIS_PERSONAL_REMARK_ON_HOMOSEXUALS_AS_CHURCH_TEACHING.doc

THE FRANCIS EFFECT & WHO AM I TO JUDGE-THE SPIRIT OF VATICAN COUNCIL II?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_FRANCIS_EFFECT_&_WHO_AM_I_TO_JUDGE-THE_SPIRIT_OF_VATICAN_COUNCIL_II.doc

Advertisements


Categories: Liturgical Abuses

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

fergymisquitta

The greatest WordPress.com site in all the land!

ephesians-511.net Testimonies

EPHESIANS-511.NET- A Roman Catholic Ministry Exposing Errors in the Indian Church Michael Prabhu, METAMORPHOSE, #12,Dawn Apartments, 22,Leith Castle South Street, Chennai – 600 028, Tamilnadu, India. Phone: +91 (44) 24611606 E-mail: michaelprabhu@vsnl.net, http://www.ephesians-511.net

EPHESIANS-511.NET- A Roman Catholic Ministry Exposing Errors in the Indian Church

Michael Prabhu, METAMORPHOSE, #12,Dawn Apartments, 22,Leith Castle South Street, Chennai - 600 028, Tamilnadu, India. Phone: +91 (44) 24611606 E-mail: michaelprabhu@vsnl.net, http://www.ephesians-511.net

%d bloggers like this: