Pope Francis legitimizes Holy Thursday washing of women’s feet

JANUARY 27/MARCH 15, 2016

 

Pope Francis legitimizes Holy Thursday washing of women’s feet

I regret to be re-writing this introduction, adopted from my earlier reports, in the past tense.

Liturgical law, till now, did not permit the feet of women to be washed at the Maundy Thursday Mass.

If performed, the action was inarguably illicit.

The rubrics authorized that only the feet of men were to be washed by the celebrant.

Whenever Pope Francis washed the feet of women at Mass on Holy Thursday (and 2015 was the third successive year that he had done it), two groups of people were exhilarated: liberals who now argued that if the Pope himself “ignores the law” (to cite eminent canon lawyer Dr. Ed Peters), then they too are not required to be absolutely bound by the rubrics, and the other group was the women’s ordination activists who felt that their hope-less case was given a glimmer of hope. After all, as we have been observing since the very day that he assumed his pontificate, with this Pope anything is possible.

On March 29, 2013, famous blogger Fr. John Zuhlsdorf asked the rhetorical question, “(Have we) entered an age of a new Gnosticism?http://wdtprs.com/blog/2013/03/have-we-entered-an-age-of-a-new-gnosticism/.

Every leading conservative (and Traditionalist) agency joined in the chorus of criticism which is recorded at

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01-WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON MAUNDY THURSDAY
28, 29 MARCH/4, 9, 15 APRIL/17 MAY 2013 117 pages

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01-WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_MAUNDY_THURSDAY.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01A-WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON MAUNDY THURSDAY
APRIL 2015, 6 pages
http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01A-WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_MAUNDY_THURSDAY.doc

 

At the onset of the women’s feet-washing controversy, this ministry wrote three letters (two of them in Spanish) to Pope Francis and some Vatican departments:

1. From:
Michael Prabhu
To:
av@pccs.va; cancilleria@arzbaires.org.ar
Cc:
cultdiv@ccdds.va

Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:49 AM

Subject: YOUR HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS, PLEASE DO NOT WASH THE FEET OF WOMEN THIS MAUNDY THURSDAY…

 

To,

His Holiness Pope Francis,

Vatican City, Rome

                                                                                                                                            March 25, 2013

 
 

                SUBJECT: WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN AT HOLY MASS ON MAUNDY THURSDAY

 
 

Your Holiness,

We understand from news reports that You intend to wash the feet of six men and SIX WOMEN at Holy Mass on March 28, 2013, Maundy Thursday.

We pray that there is no truth in that information.

In case there is any truth in that information, we request You to please refrain from doing that and only wash the feet of twelve men. 

If You wash the feet of women during the liturgy, it will send a wrong signal to many and give an impetus to some enemies of the Catholic Church.

We have nothing against Your washing the feet of women on Holy Thursday if it is done outside of Holy Mass, in a non-liturgical service.

We understand that the rubrics of the liturgy permit only the feet of “viri” (men) to be washed by a priest; so we humbly suggest — in the event that You really do want to have the feet of women washed — that You change the presently-existing rubrics to include women before their feet are washed by You.

Yours obediently,

MICHAEL PRABHU

Catholic apologist, INDIA

 

 

 

2. From:
Michael Prabhu
To:
cancilleria@arzbaires.org.ar; av@pccs.va
Cc:
cultdiv@ccdds.va

Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 2:32 PM

Subject: ASUNTO: LAVADO DE LOS PIES DE MUJERES EN LA SANTA MISA DE JUEVES SANTO

 

A la atención de:

Su Santidad el Papa Francisco

Ciudad del Vaticano, Roma

                                                                                                                                             25 de marzo de 2013

                           
 

             ASUNTO: LAVADO DE LOS PIES DE MUJERES EN LA SANTA MISA DE JUEVES SANTO

 
 

Su Santidad,

Hemos podido saber a través de ciertos informes que tiene intención de lavar los pies de seis hombres y seis mujeres durante la Santa Misa del 28 de marzo de 2013, Jueves Santo.

Rogamos que no sea verdad esta información.

Pero en caso de que haya algún tipo de certeza en ella, le solicitamos que por favor se abstenga de hacerlo y sólo lave los pies de doce hombres.

Si Su Santidad lava pies de mujeres durante la liturgia se enviará una señal equivocada a mucha gente y dará impulso a las críticas de algunos enemigos de la Iglesia Católica.

No tenemos nada en contra de que lave los pies de las mujeres el Jueves Santo si se hace fuera de la Santa Misa, por ejemplo en un servicio no litúrgico.

Entendemos que las reglas de la liturgia sólo le permiten a un sacerdote lavar los pies a “viri” (hombres), por lo que humildemente sugerimos-en el caso de que realmente quiera lavar los pies a mujeres- que cambie la normativa actualmente existente para incluir a las mujeres en el lavado de pies hecho por Su Santidad.

Suyo humildemente,

MICHAEL PRABHU

Apologista católico, INDIA

 

3. From:
Croydon D’souza
To:
av@pccs.va ; cancilleria@arzbaires.org.ar

Cc:
cdf@cfaith.va; ladaria@unigre.it; servus@urbaniana.edu; segreteria@propagandafide.va; mjconde@ediurcla.it; nonducorduco@fastwebnet.it; mab_8@msn.com; pellerey@unisal.it; kkasteel@corunum.va; arcivescovado@diocesi.genova.it; uzgnadb@zg.t-com.hr; erzbischoefliches-haus@erzbistum-koeln.de; gombp@katolikus.hu; primadodemexico@yahoo.com.mx; archevechedkr@sentoo.sn; cultdiv@ccdds.va

Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 8:04 PM

Subject: LAVADO DE LOS PIES DE MUJERES DURANTE LA MISA DE JUEVES SANTO

 

A Su Santidad el Papa Francisco

Ciudad del Vaticano, Roma

                                                                                                                                 27 de marzo de 2013

 
 

              TEMA:
LAVADO DE LOS PIES DE MUJERES DURANTE LA MISA DE JUEVES SANTO

Su Santidad,

Hemos sabido a través de noticiarios que Usted tiene la intención de lavar los pies de seis hombres y SEIS MUJERES durante la Misa de Jueves Santo del 28 de marzo de 2013.

Rezamos para que esa información esté equivocada.

Si es exacta, le pedimos que por favor no lo haga y lave unicamente los pies de 12 hombres.

Si lava los pies de mujeres durante la liturgia, enviará una señal equivodad a muchos y dará ímpetu a algunos enemigos de la Iglesia Católica.

No tenemos nada contrario a que Usted lave los pies de mujeres el Jueves Santo fuera de la Santa misa, en un servicio no litúrgico.

Entendemos que las reglas litúrgicas permiten unicamente que los pies de los “viri” (hombres) sean lavados por un sacerdote; por lo cual sugerimos humildemente – en el caso que Usted quiera efectivamente lavar los pies de mujeres – que se cambien las reglas litúrgicas para incluir a las mujeres antes del lavado de los pies.

Le saluda atentamente,

CROYDON D’SOUZA

Apologista Católico, 601/602, Greenlands CHS, Opposite St Anthony’s Church, Malwani Village, Malwani, Malad (W), Mumbai, INDIA

My email letters to Rome in both English and Spanish were on this ministry’s letterhead –Michael

It is quite certain that the Pope received requests from other Catholics too or read the concerns of Catholics in the news media. He however went ahead with the illicit act, and repeated it in 2014 and again in 2015.

 

 

 

This year, he decided to make the illicit action licit by an “innovation”:

The Pope decrees that not only men may be chosen for the washing of the feet in the Liturgy of Holy Thursday

http://visnews-en.blogspot.in/2016/01/the-pope-decrees-that-not-only-men-may.html

Vatican City, VIS news, January 21, 2016

The Holy Father has written a letter, dated 20 December 2014 and published today, to Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, in which he decrees that from now on, the people chosen for the washing of the feet in the liturgy of Holy Thursday may be selected from all the People of God, and not only men and boys.

The Pope writes to the cardinal that he has for some time reflected on the “rite of the washing of the feet contained in the Liturgy of the Mass in Coena Domini, with the intention of improving the way in which it is performed so that it might express more fully the meaning of Jesus’ gesture in the Cenacle, His giving of Himself unto the end for the salvation of the world, His limitless charity”.

“After careful consideration”, he continues, “I have decided to make a change to the Roman Missal. I therefore decree that the section according to which those persons chosen for the Washing of the feet must be men or boys, so that from now on the Pastors of the Church may choose the participants in the rite from among all the members of the People of God. I also recommend that an adequate explanation of the rite itself be provided to those who are chosen”.

The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has today published a decree on the aforementioned rite, dated 6 January 2016, the full text of which is published below:

“The reform of the Holy Week, by the decree Maxima Redemptionis nostrae mysteria of November 1955, provides the faculty, where counselled by pastoral motives, to perform the washing of the feet of twelve men during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, after the reading of the Gospel according to John, as if almost to represent Christ’s humility and love for His disciples.

In the Roman liturgy this rite was handed down with the name of the Mandatum of the Lord on brotherly charity in accordance with Jesus’ words, sung in the Antiphon during the celebration.

In performing this rite, bishops and priests are invited to conform intimately to Christ who ‘came not to be served but to serve’ and, driven by a love ‘to the end’, to give His life for the salvation of all humankind.

To manifest the full meaning of the rite to those who participate in it, the Holy Father Francis has seen fit to change the rule by in the Roman Missal (p.300, No. 11) according to which the chosen men are accompanied by the ministers, which must therefore be modified as follows: ‘Those chosen from among the People of God are accompanied by the ministers’ (and consequently in the Caeremoniale Episcoporum No. 301 and No. 299 b referring to the seats for the chosen men, so that pastors may choose a group of faithful representing the variety and unity of every part of the People of God. This group may consist of men and women, and ideally of the young and the old, healthy and sick, clerics, consecrated persons and laypeople.

This Congregation for Divine Worship and the Disipline of the Sacraments, by means of the faculties granted by the Supreme Pontiff, introduces this innovation in the liturgical books of the Roman Rite, recalling pastors of their duty to instruct adequately both the chosen faithful and others, so that they may participate in the rite consciously, actively and fruitfully”.

 

RELATED INFORMATION: NEWS REPORTS AND CRITICISMS

Pope Decrees That Holy Thursday Foot Washing Ceremony Can Include Women

Those Chosen Should Represent Entire People of God: Young and Old, Healthy and Sick

https://zenit.org/articles/pope-decrees-that-holy-thursday-foot-washing-ceremony-can-include-women/

January 21, 2016

The Holy Father has written a letter, dated 20 December and published today, to Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, in which he decrees that from now on, the people chosen for the washing of the feet in the liturgy of Holy Thursday may be selected from all the People of God, and not only men and boys.

The Pope writes to the cardinal that he has for some time reflected on the “rite of the washing of the feet contained in the Liturgy of the Mass in Coena Domini, with the intention of improving the way in which it is performed so that it might express more fully the meaning of Jesus’ gesture in the Cenacle, His giving of Himself unto the end for the salvation of the world, His limitless charity”.

“After careful consideration”, he continues, “I have decided to make a change to the Roman Missal. I therefore decree that the section according to which those persons chosen for the Washing of the feet must be men or boys, so that from now on the Pastors of the Church may choose the participants in the rite from among all the members of the People of God. I also recommend that an adequate explanation of the rite itself be provided to those who are chosen”.

The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has today published a decree on the aforementioned rite, dated 6 January 2016, the full text of which is published below:

“The reform of the Holy Week, by the decree Maxima Redemptionis nostrae mysteria of November 1955, provides the faculty, where counselled by pastoral motives, to perform the washing of the feet of twelve men during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, after the reading of the Gospel according to John, as if almost to represent Christ’s humility and love for His disciples.

 

In the Roman liturgy this rite was handed down with the name of the Mandatum of the Lord on brotherly charity in accordance with Jesus’ words, sung in the Antiphon during the celebration.

In performing this rite, bishops and priests are invited to conform intimately to Christ who ‘came not to be served but to serve’ and, driven by a love ‘to the end’, to give His life for the salvation of all humankind.

To manifest the full meaning of the rite to those who participate in it, the Holy Father Francis has seen fit to change the rule by in the Roman Missal (p.300, No. 11) according to which the chosen men are accompanied by the ministers, which must therefore be modified as follows: ‘Those chosen from among the People of God are accompanied by the ministers’ (and consequently in the Caeremoniale Episcoporum No. 301 and No. 299 b referring to the seats for the chosen men, so that pastors may choose a group of faithful representing the variety and unity of every part of the People of God. This group may consist of men and women, and ideally of the young and the old, healthy and sick, clerics, consecrated persons and laypeople.

This Congregation for Divine Worship and the Disipline of the Sacraments, by means of the faculties granted by the Supreme Pontiff, introduces this innovation in the liturgical books of the Roman Rite, recalling pastors of their duty to instruct adequately both the chosen faithful and others, so that they may participate in the rite consciously, actively and fruitfully”.

 

 

“I have decided:” Francis introduces massive liturgical novelty as personal whim

https://veneremurcernui.wordpress.com/2016/01/21/i-have-decided-francis-introduces-massive-liturgical-novelty-as-personal-whim/. The author’s comments are in red.

January 21, 2016

So the inevitable has happened, and Francis has further paved the way for fake women priests by formally directing the women’s feet may be washed during the Maundy Thursday Mass in the universal Church.  It is assumed this does not apply to the Ecclesia Dei communities, but I don’t know on what sure basis such assumptions stand.  The formal declaration is worded in such a way that this act would require a direct repudiation by a successor to repeal: something the conservativish popes since the Council have been reticent to do.  Some details via the Vatican Information Service:

 

The Holy Father has written a letter, dated 20 December and published today, to Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, in which he decrees that from now on, the people chosen for the washing of the feet in the liturgy of Holy Thursday may be selected from all the People of God, and not only men and boys.

The Pope writes to the cardinal that he has for some time reflected on the “rite of the washing of the feet contained in the Liturgy of the Mass in Coena Domini, with the intention of improving the way in which it is performed so that it might express more fully the meaning of Jesus’ gesture in the Cenacle, His giving of Himself unto the end for the salvation of the world, His limitless charity”. [Certainly the foot washing had that intent.  But it also had the intent of confirming the male apostles as the heirs of Christ’s salvific action and the inheritors of his Body on Earth, the Church.  This action is a huge demonstration of the all-male priesthood intended by Christ, and by stripping it away, Pope Francis now severely undercuts the popular rationale for the male priesthood.  I cannot believe this to be incidental.]

“After careful consideration”, he continues, “I have decided to make a change to the Roman Missal. I therefore decree that the section according to which those persons chosen for the Washing of the feet must be men or boys, so that from now on the Pastors of the Church may choose the participants in the rite from among all the members of the People of God. I also recommend that an adequate explanation of the rite itself be provided to those who are chosen”. [This “may” will manifest in all non-traditional parishes as a “must.”  I would be shocked if 1 in 100 Novus Ordo parishes did not have women in the lineup this Holy Thursday]

The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has today published a decree on the aforementioned rite, dated 6 January 2016, the full text of which is published below:

The reform of the Holy Week, by the decree Maxima Redemptionis nostrae mysteria of November 1955, provides the faculty, where counselled by pastoral motives, to perform the washing of the feet of twelve men during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, after the reading of the Gospel according to John, as if almost to represent Christ’s humility and love for His disciples. [Nice little bit of return fire there from Cardinal Sarah of the CDW, attempting to undo a bit of the damage by plainly laying out why Christ had only men in the Upper Room and why he only washed male feet – because that was His specific intent, not because he was limited by any constraints of the times.  What a ludicrous proposition to impose such a restriction on the God of the Universe who had worked countless miracles before hundreds of thousands of souls!]

 

I also included that last bit to say this: we can see where even the well-meaning reforms of the 1950s could lead.  Some of those reforms under Pius XII were returns to ancient practice, to be sure, but others were great novelties.  

 

 

There were reasons they had been abrogated or diminished over the Church’s long history.  When meddling with ancient, infinitely sacred things, unintended consequences tend to abound.

I wonder if more priests of relative orthodoxy will now, following the example of a few already, determine it pastorally unhelpful to do the foot washing.

Will this be one of Francis’ “grand gestures” that prove difficult or impossible to reform?  Do you think this is just a bit of multi-kulti pandering, or is this an act deliberately intended to fundamentally weaken the logic behind the male priesthood?

Do priests who have steadfastly held to the liturgical rites as written in spite of great pressure to emulate the Franciscan example now feel total fools, having the rug pulled out from underneath them?

Note that Francis remains disobedient to the liturgical norms even as he has modified them: he speaks of inviting the “people of God,” which means souls in union with the Church, to the Mandatum, but he himself has used those not in such union, including practicing muslims.

Also note that the constant apologists for the papacy are now telling us how wonderful a gift to the Church this act is, even declaring, as a good reason for the reform (and I am not making this up), that women’s feet are cute.  It is amazing the lengths to which these folks will go to justify the unjustifiable.  It leaves me wondering the extent to which their adherence to the Novus Ordo (and I mean no disrespect to those here who have no option) informs this seeming willingness to see the Liturgy continuously reformed out of existence.

Bergoglio has been doing this for a looong time.  There are numerous photos of him as Archbishop of Buenos Aires washing the feet of women, whether Catholic or not (and typically not).  How many of those subsequently converted by this “grand example” is not known.  A small sampling below: (images omitted)

I have to say to the cardinals who elected this pope……really?!?  This guy was so known for who and what he was, we have the testimony of the “St. Gallen” group of collaboration in destroying Benedict and electing this guy, and yet most cardinals still went along with it.  Were 2/3 really in on the plot?  Or is my surmise right, that half or more of even cardinals are just reeds shaking in the wind, blowing whichever way they see as favorable for them from one minute to the next, with no real faith or even backbone to guide them?

About a dozen comments worth reading

 

 

Best take I’ve seen on Maundy Thursday female foot fetish, er, washing

https://veneremurcernui.wordpress.com/2016/01/21/best-take-ive-seen-on-maundy-thursday-female-foot-fetish-er-washing/. The author’s comments are in red.

January 21, 2016

Vox Cantoris* has a post that I think brings up an important point.  He recommends the new foot washing rubric as a great reason to abandon the Novus Ordo and immerse oneself in the bosom of tradition.  I really couldn’t agree more (most emphasis in original, I add comments):

*Hey Ladies, line up to get your feet washed. Francis changes Holy Thursday rubrics to the Mass after 2000 years! http://voxcantor.blogspot.in/2016/01/hey-ladies-line-up-to-get-your-feet.html

 

Pope proves that if you disobey a law long enough, the Church will change it.

His “god of surprises” has more in store!

Reason #5264 why we should just leave the Nervous Disordered Mess and its Bugnini lead Masonic inspired sacrilege. It has just been revealed, hidden as it was since a few days before Christmas, that Franciscus has changed the rubrics for Holy Thursday from “Viri Selecti.”

That’s right ladies, you can wear a short skirt and give a little flash to Father Bob as he pours water on your feet in front of the congregation. But don’t worry, he’ll probably have no interest because he’s as queer as this decision…….

…….You and I, however; we are the dissenters. We are the sinners of course. We are those not open to his “god of surprises.” [Leftism masquerading as the Holy Spirit, more like?]

Well, surprise!

Does Franciscus have the legal power to do this? Of course.

Does he have the moral authority? NO, not in a million years. [But that’s just the thing.  The liturgical and doctrinal revolution of Vatican II ushered in an era of progressive will to power, where whatever they want, they just do, whether justified by tradition or morality or not]

It is another example of dissenters changing practice, changing doctrine. [Concur]

Communion-in-the-hand.

Girl Altar Boys.

Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion.

It is all, as it this, a liturgical abuse, legalised through the breaking of the law.

So, how do you like the god of surprises, so far, eh?

I will never, ever attend the Sacred Triduum in the Novus Ordo as long as I shall live. I will sit home and read it first before I will ever attend it again if that was all I could do! 

 

 

Is it true then? Did he really stand up and shout that he would strip the 13 Cardinals of their red hats? “Full power has been given to me, I run the show around here?”Did he say it? Because if he didn’t, he sure acts like it! [So I almost blogged on this yesterday, but kind of ran out of time and sorta thought it was still a bit conjectural.  But frankly, I don’t doubt it a bit that Francis lost his, uh, stuff, when he first heard about the intervention of the 13 cardinals at the Ordinary Synod.  Too bad it wasn’t 130 cardinals]

No Wotyla, No Ratzinger would ever have gotten away with this.

What a blatant, idiotic, abominable decision on the part of the Bishop of Rome. The lawbreaker has become the lawmaker!

Fathers reading this! You have a choice. 
[This is really key…..] The Washing of the Feet was not part of the Mass until 1955. It was a rite reserved to Cathedrals, Monasteries, Seminaries and Religious Houses. When it was put after the homily on Holy Thursday in the “Reformed Holy Week” by Pius XII at the urging of Annibale Bugnini and other modernists hidden away in the liturgical offices of the Vatican, it was the first time in 2000 years that the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was interrupted for a para-liturgy. It was then and remains in the traditional Missal and in the modernist Missal, an “option.” It does not have to be done. It can be optioned out! So, option it out! The decree only changes what it expressly seeks to change. The fact is, it is still an option! [Yes, but we can rest assured that almost all national conferences and individual bishocrats will insist on this being the “norm” for their nations/dioceses, upon pain of supposed “disobedience.” Ergo, fleeing for the Ecclesia Dei communities is really the best if not only option, at least for now.  We’ll see how long that lasts, what with pressure being applied to Pope Francis by liberals to modify the traditional Liturgy, as well. In which case, I suspect the Society can expect rapid growth]

It does not apply to the traditional Mass.

Where is the consultation with the “brother bishops?” Where is the “collegiality?” This Pope has become a dictator, an absolutist, a Peronist! …

…….You have one choice friends, leave the Novus Ordo. Get out of it and get into Tradition in every way. It is going to come crashing down. It is a valid Mass when, blah, blah, blah; but it cannot be reformed, it can only be abrogated and it will be! [Said the man who has worked for the “reform of the reform,” by his own admission, for 30 years.  That is to say, this is not a flippant admission.  I have to agree.  I have to further agree that I plan to never attend another N.O. as long as I live, and have great sympathy for those whose circumstances make a fully regular TLM difficult to impossible to assist at]

 

Tell us how you really feel, Vox!

Naw, I’m right there with you.  I’m not surprised, but I am scandalized as all get out.  And I don’t think this is anywhere close to the end.  If you hold out hope that this pontificate may be shortened by abdication, you may as well forget that now.  I’ve never known a progressive to not hold onto power as long as humanly possible.  So we can probably expect dramatically worse things to come.

Metaphor for the Church:

We really must be praying for our Church and for Francis.  The reckoning that man will face……….makes me shudder.

Four comments worth reading

 

 

Pope Francis opens Holy Thursday foot-washing rite to women

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/2016/01/21/pope-francis-opens-holy-thursday-foot-washing-rite-to-women/

January 21, 2016

The Holy Father broke convention in 2013 when he washed women prisoners’ feet

Pope Francis has issued a decree changing the way that the Holy Thursday foot-washing rite is celebrated around the world.

The decree was published today by the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments and signed by prefect Cardinal Robert Sarah.

The decree says that the rite should no longer be limited to men.

The Vatican website has published a letter from Pope Francis to Cardinal Sarah confirming the changes.

The letter, written in Italian, says that the Pope made the changes “so that it might express more fully the meaning of Jesus’s gesture in the Cenacle, His giving of Himself unto the end for the salvation of the world, His limitless charity”.

The Pope continues: “After careful consideration, I have decided to make a change to the Roman Missal. I therefore decree that the section according to which those persons chosen for the washing of the feet must be men or boys, so that from now on the Pastors of the Church may choose the participants in the rite from among all the members of the People of God. I also recommend that an adequate explanation of the rite itself be provided to those who are chosen.”

Francis broke convention on the first Holy Thursday after his papal election in 2013, when he washed the feet of women prisoners.

 

 

In practice, many parishes around the world have long included women in the rite.

The foot-washing rite is known as the Mandatum, after the first word of Jesus’s saying in John 13:34 before he washed his disciples’ feet: “Mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos” (“I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another”).

The rite was celebrated separately to the Holy Thursday Mass before Pope Pius XII restored it in 1955.

The rubric for the washing of the feet in force until today read: “After the homily, where a pastoral reason suggests it, the Washing of Feet follows. The men who have been chosen (viri selecti) are led by the ministers to seats prepared in a suitable place. Then the priest (removing his chasuble if necessary) goes to each one, and, with the help of the ministers, pours water over each one’s feet and then dries them.”

According to the decree, the rubric will now read “Those chosen from among the People of God” instead of “The men who have been chosen”.

According to the Vatican Information Service, the decree says: “The reform of the Holy Week, by the decree Maxima Redemptionis nostrae mysteria of November 1955, provides the faculty, where counselled by pastoral motives, to perform the washing of the feet of twelve men during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, after the reading of the Gospel according to John, as if almost to represent Christ’s humility and love for His disciples.

“In the Roman liturgy this rite was handed down with the name of the Mandatum of the Lord on brotherly charity in accordance with Jesus’ words, sung in the Antiphon during the celebration.

“In performing this rite, bishops and priests are invited to conform intimately to Christ who ‘came not to be served but to serve’ and, driven by a love ‘to the end’, to give His life for the salvation of all humankind.

“To manifest the full meaning of the rite to those who participate in it, the Holy Father Francis has seen fit to change the rule by in the Roman Missal (p.300, No. 11) according to which the chosen men are accompanied by the ministers, which must therefore be modified as follows: ‘Those chosen from among the People of God are accompanied by the ministers’ (and consequently in the Caeremoniale Episcoporum No. 301 and No. 299 b referring to the seats for the chosen men, so that pastors may choose a group of faithful representing the variety and unity of every part of the People of God. This group may consist of men and women, and ideally of the young and the old, healthy and sick, clerics, consecrated persons and lay people.

“This Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, by means of the faculties granted by the Supreme Pontiff, introduces this innovation in the liturgical books of the Roman Rite, recalling pastors of their duty to instruct adequately both the chosen faithful and others, so that they may participate in the rite consciously, actively and fruitfully.”

In a statement, the Latin Mass Society of England and Wales said: “This decree can be seen as a concession to existing practice, and its good intentions are evident. It nevertheless undermines attempts to ‘resacralise’ the Ordinary Form, and it reinforces the trend which has seen priests increasingly surrounded by women during Mass, serving, doing the readings, and as Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion. This inevitably makes the all-male priesthood itself harder to understand.

“Liturgical conservatives who have sought in recent decades to keep the rules of the Roman Missal by admitting only men to the ceremony of the Mandatum, often in the face of considerable pressure, may well feel the rug has been pulled from under them by this decree. This has happened many times, as Rome has felt unable to hold the line on liturgical abuses, and has simply allowed them: notably female altar servers and Communion in the hand.

“These concessions have moved many to reconsider the Extraordinary Form, which is not affected by this decree, or similar concessions to liturgical abuses in the past. It is in the Extraordinary Form that the Church’s liturgical traditions are maintained.”

 

 

The inevitable: Pope Francis decrees that Maundy Thursday foot-washing can include women

http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2016/01/the-inevitable-takes-place-pope-francis.html

January 21, 2016

When, within two weeks of his election, Francis chose to include women (including a Muslim) among the “viri” whose feet he washed as part of the Maundy Thursday Mass, we immediately grasped its significance and posted that it was “The Official End of the Reform of the Reform – by example“. He repeated the inclusion of women in the foot-washing rite in 2014 and 2015, which could only have meant that he desired to normalize the practice. Today’s reform was inevitable. It was only a matter of time. 

We predict that before long, like many other “options” such as communion in the hand, female altar boys, “extraordinary” ministers of holy communion and “ad populum” celebrations, having women take part in the Maundy Thursday washing of the feet will become virtually obligatory, with the priests who refuse it being stigmatized as “reactionaries” and punished in a variety of ways. 

Francis pushing this decree through Robert Cardinal Sarah is another reminder that, no matter what the highest officials of the CDW say and do in their private capacity, it is still the express will of the Pope that matters in the end. Beautiful reflections, edifying personal example and words of encouragement are no substitutes for clear legislation. As long as the “Reform of the Reform” is not embodied in clear legislation that is vigorously enforced from the very top, it will never take off the ground and will never be more than the hobby of a tiny minority. No amount of brave talk from a handful of bloggers will change this.

 

 

At the same time this “reform” should not be surprising, as it flows from the intrinsic malleability of the “Novus Ordo” (by which we mean not only the Mass but also the entire range of liturgical books associated with it.) The reality of the Novus Ordo makes slogans such as “say the black and do the red” and the entire concept of “liturgical abuse”, essentially meaningless. When the “black” and “red” could be changed anytime under the pressure of clerical and lay disobedience and the whims of those in power, today’s “disobedience” could end up being tomorrow’s obedience to the “God of Surprises”. 

One last point: the new rubrics for foot washing still limits it to the “faithful”, members of the “People of God”. Muslims are definitely not part of the “People of God”, no matter how much one tries to stretch the meaning of the term without losing all coherence. Next Maundy Thursday, will the Pope still wash the feet of an unbaptized woman or two? (Emphases in red mine –Michael)

There is a silver lining to all this, of course: our fellow Rorate contributor Joseph Shaw explains in his Statement on allowing the washing of the feet of women at the OF mandatum:

These concessions have moved many to reconsider the Extraordinary Form, which is not affected by this decree, or similar concessions to liturgical abuses in the past. It is in the Extraordinary Form that the Church’s liturgical traditions are maintained.

[New Catholic: Two comments on historical matters. (1) This is one of the signs of irreformable acts by Francis. Since the beginning of his pontificate, his main supporters, including Cardinal Maradiaga, have insisted that the Pope wanted his reforms to be so great and symbolic no successor of his could ever overturn them. This is surely one example.

(2) What is most tragic is to see the very same impulses that imploded Anglicanism imposed on Latin Church decades later. These impulses are not only untraditional — which may be an advantageous characteristic in the Pope’s mind — but counterproductive. Unless the intention is to destroy the soul and strength of the Church, weaken Her even more, and to sow doubts on the immutability of symbolic explanations for the Male Priesthood in the Catholic Church. Surely that is not what was intended and what was sought. Surely not!]

 

 

Pope Francis makes changes to footwashing, but . . .

http://www.cogwriter.com/news/church-history/pope-francis-makes-changes-to-footwashing-but/

January 21, 2016

Pope Francis made a change, but is the new practice the truly biblical footwashing practice?

To address this, we first need to look at what Jesus taught about it:

And supper being ended, the devil having already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray Him, Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into His hands, and that He had come from God and was going to God, rose from supper and laid aside His garments, took a towel and girded Himself. After that, He poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel with which He was girded (John 13:2-5).

So when He had washed their feet, taken His garments, and sat down again, He said to them, “Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord, and you say well, for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have given you an example, that you should do as I have done to you … 17 If you know these things, blessed are you if you do them. (John 13:12-15, 17).

23… If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our home with him. 24 He who does not love Me does not keep My words; and the word which you hear is not Mine but the Father’s who sent Me. (John 14:23-24)

Almost no Protestant group follows what Jesus taught–even though their leaders should know better. Footwashing is not an annual ceremony performed by most who claim to be Protestant (though some have done it).

History shows that even the Greco-Romans observed at least a version of footwashing.

However, notice the following statements about it:

Christ’s command to wash one another’s feet must have been understood from the beginning in a literal sense (Thurston, H. (1912). Washing of Feet and Hands. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved July 14, 2015 from New Advent: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15557b.htm)

The history of feetwashing is tantalizingly elusive…There are passing references to this rite in the first centuries. Continued for many years in the Eastern Church, feet washing eventually fell out of favour in the West. But it was carried out long enough to be introduced among the earliest Celtic Christians…in the Stowe Missal. The Celt’s adherence to the literal interpretation of the Scriptures seems to have led him to follow the procedures of the upper room exactly. For in that service Christ washed the feet of his disciples before he distributed the bread and the wine to his followers (Hardinge, Leslie. The Celtic Church in Britain. Teach Services, Brushton (NY) 2000, pp. 111,116).

As to the feet-washing, since the Lord recommended this because of its being an example of that humility which He came to teach, as He Himself afterwards explained, the question has arisen at what time it is best, by literal performance of this work, to give public instruction in the important duty which it illustrates, and this time [of Lent] was suggested in order that the lesson taught by it might make a deeper and more serious impression…Some, however, in order to connect its observance with the more sacred associations of this solemn season (Augustine. Letter (Epistola) 55, From Augustine to Januarius, Verse 33. A.D. 400).

 

Cyprian of Carthage in the mid-3rd century wrote:

Let them imitate the Lord, who at the very time of His passion was not more proud, but more humble. For then He washed His disciples’ feet, saying, “If I, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet, ye ought also to wash one another’s feet.

 

For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you.” (Cyprian.  The Epistles of Cyprian, Epistle 5, Chapter 2. In Ante-Nicene Fathers/Volume V).

 

In the early centuries there was no Roman Catholic pontifex maximus.  Regular lay members washed each other’s feet.  While females were involved, they apparently washed other female’s feet.  And that is the practice that is observed in groups in the 21st century like the Continuing Church of God.

 

The Catholic saint and bishop Ambrose of Milan (4th century) seemed to have elevated its status:

Accordingly, learn how it is a sacrament and a means of sanctification: Unless I wash thy feet, thou wilt have no part with me. This I say, not to find fault with others, but to recommend my own usage (Ambrose of Milan. “On the mysteries”: and the treatise, On the sacraments.  Translated by Tom Thompson.  Edied by James Herbert Strawley.  Society for promoting Christian Knowledge, 1919. Original from the University of Michigan, Digitized, Jul 2, 2009, p. 99)

 

Around the early 6th century, Caesarius of Arles in a sermon (103.4) taught:

As often as the Paschal feast comes…Let them…wash the feet of their guests (Cited in Thomas JC. Footwashing in John 13 and the Johannine Community. Published by Continuum International Publishing Group, 2004, p. 145).

So, it was still observed by at least some lay people in the 6th century.  Lay people were doing the washing, not just clergy.

 

Furthermore, notice the following from The Catholic Encyclopedia:

This theory, which was first put forward by Sir W. Palmer in his “Origines Liturgicae”, which was once very popular among Anglicans. According to it the Gallican Rite was referred to an original brought to Lyons from Ephesus by St. Pothinus and St. Irenæus, who had received it through St. Polycarp from St. John the Divine. The idea originated partly in a statement in the eighth century tract in Cott. manuscript Nero A. II in the British Museum, which refers the Gallican Divine Office (Cursus Gallorum) to such an origin, and partly in a statement of Coleman at the Synod of Whitby (664) respecting the Johannine origin of the Celtic Easter…

The Feet Washing. The form here is similar to that in the Gallicanum, the Bobbio, and the Stowe: “Ego te lavo pedes. Sicut D.N.J.C. fecit discipulis suis, tu facias hospitibus et peregrenis ut habeas vitam aeternam”. This ceremony is only found in Gaul, Spain, and Ireland. At the Council of Elvira in 305 an order was made that it should be performed by clerks and not by priests. This limitation, of which the wording is quite clear, has been unaccountably interpreted to mean that it was then forbidden altogether (Jenner H. Transcribed by Geoffrey K. Mondello, Ph.D. The Gallican Rite. The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VI. Published 1909. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Nihil Obstat, September 1, 1909. Remy Lafort, Censor. Imprimatur. +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York).

 

So, Bishop Polycarp of Smyrna learned the practice from the Apostle John and passed it on. So, history teaches this carried on for some time in the British Isles. It needs to be understood that the “Celtic Easter” refers to the fact that many Celts kept Passover on the biblical date. However, by the time the “Gallican Rites” are recorded, foot-washing is mainly done at the time of baptism.

 

Some Waldenses in the late Middle Ages also observed feetwashing:

The Waldenses who are acknowledged to have come the closest to the purity of the faith and practice of the doctrines of Christ, held feet washing as an ordinance of the church. (St John HA. Our Banquet to Nourish Pure Thought Life. Published by Kessinger Publishing, 2003, p. 97)

Some called Waldenesians were part of the Church of God (see also the article on The Thyatira Church Era).

And although the Roman Catholic pontiff (and sometimes Roman bishops) performs this ceremony once, I am unaware of any others within Roman Catholicism that perform this ceremony–and when it is done, it is done as a memorial and is done on the annual night that the Romans feel was the night of Jesus’ last Passover.

 

This brings up two questions:

1) Since Jesus commanded His disciples to do this, why do Protestant leaders generally not teach or do this?

2) If the Roman Church recognizes that this is an annual event done on Passover (which they call Maundy Thursday), why do they and others observe the other steps of their version of the Passover (which they now generally refer to as communion) every week or even every day?

 

An answer proposed to the first question, given by the late Church of God leader Herbert W. Armstrong, was:

Many today do not want to humiliate themselves by washing the feet of their church brethren. Some argue that Jesus commanded only the disciples to wash one another’s feet. But they will admit it was a command to them. Very well; turn to Matthew 28:19, 20:

“Go ye therefore,” Jesus said to these same disciples, “and teach all nations, baptizing them . . . teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you.” So they were to teach US to observe all things whatsoever He commanded them. Surely God is no respecter of persons (Armstrong HW. How Often Should We Partake of the Lord’s Supper? 1974).

 

I have no clear answer to the second question about why Rome does one part of the Jesus’ last Passover annually, but other portions weekly (or more often). Yet, I suspect that the heretic Justin Martyr
probably had something to do with Rome’s acceptance of a weekly Sunday “Passover” (as he is the first one to clearly refer to a Sunday worship service which included a “eucharist” ceremony), but I also suspect that he did not care for the idea of foot-washing.

 

 

It has been reported that around 1654, footwashing was observed by one or more Sabbath-keepers in England, such as Dr. Peter Chamberlen, and decades later in the early 1700s by John Maulden and those of like mind (Ball B. Seventh Day Men: Sabbatarians and Sabbatarianism in England and Wales, 1600-1800, 2nd edition. James Clark & Co., 2009, pp. 79, 81, 89).

It may also be of interest to note that some Sabbatarians engaged in footwashing and in 1750 wrote:

And now, dear brethren, we shall use the freedom to acquaint you with one thing, and do heartily desire to recommend it to your serious and Christian consideration, and that is about the duty to wash one another’s feet…1750 (Cited in Randolph C.F. A History of the Seventh Day Baptists in West Virginia, 1905. Heritage Books, Westminster (MD), pp. 15-16).

 

Furthermore, this practice was also followed in Virginia and other churches in West Virginia (ibid, p. 15). Here is one comment about it:

Clark says: “Some of these [western Virginia] churches, believe in the washing of one another’s feet, at appointed times” (ibid, p. 15).

It should be noted that the “foot washing” ceremony that Jesus instituted is observed annually by baptized members of the real Church of God.

We in the Continuing Church of God keep with what Jesus taught and the original apostles practiced and thus do footwashing each year.

(Footwashing is also the major subject of an available online sermon video John 13-15: Footwashing and the Words of Jesus.)

Although Pope Francis made a change, he still has not made a change back to the original practice where lay members and clergy wash feet annual in accordance with Jesus’ instructions and the early apostolic traditions.

 

 

Francis orders change to Foot Washing Rite on Holy Thursday to include females

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2016/01/francis-orders-change-to-foot-washing-rite-on-holy-thursday-to-include-females/

Posted on 21 January 2016 by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf
All emphases his (he has been an outspoken opponent …)

UPDATE 22 Jan: See the updates at the bottom.

ORIGINAL Published on: Jan 21, 2016 @ 10:42

Today brought the news that the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments (CDW) was ordered by Pope Francis to issue a document that allows for the washing of the feet of females on Holy Thursday in the optional foot washing rite during the Mass of the Last Supper in the Ordinary Form.

A letter from Francis to Card. Sarah, the CDW Prefect, dated 20 December 2014 but only posted today (21 Jan 2016) via the Bolletino notes that Francis had discussed this with Sarah previously. Francis is trying to “improve” (migliorare) the rites so that they express fully the meaning of Christ’s gesture in the Upper Room. Then Francis seems to lock into a certain interpretation of that gesture: “his self-gift ‘unto the end’ for the salvation of the world, his charity without boundaries”. Francis mentions nothing of the relationship of Christ with His Apostles. Francis then commands that there be a change in the rubrics of the Roman Missal, saying “sono giunto alla deliberazione … I have reached the decision…”

This has been brewing for over a year.

In Card. Sarah’s Decree we read that “it seemed good to the Supreme Pontiff Francis to change the norm”. Thus, now: Missalis Romani (p. 300 n. 11) legitur: «Viri selecti deducuntur a ministris…», quae idcirco sequenti modo mutari debet: «Qui selecti sunt ex populo Dei deducuntur a ministris…» (et consequenter in Caeremoniali Episcoporum n. 301 et n. 299 b: «sedes pro designatis»).

I note, however, that – in the Missale Romanum – the group from which people might be selected is restricted to “Populus Dei… the People of God”, which means, I think, at least Christians.   The Caerimoniale has different language.

So, the rubric changes from “viri selecti… chosen males” to “qui selecti sunt… those who were chosen”.

This unprecedented innovation will be in effect for the Ordinary Form this coming Triduum.

 

Observations

First, in the Ordinary Form the footwashing rite or “Mandatum” is optional. It need not be done at all. Neither can any bishop or priest be constrained to do it. Fathers, you can simply drop it.  If you are being pressured to add women or girls to those chosen, don’t do the rite.

Second, this does not apply to the Extraordinary Form. Fathers. Think about it. ¡Hagan lío!

Third, just as in the cases of Communion in the hand and the use of altar girls, both of which were legalized after years of blatant disobedience to the law, this move by Pope Francis could be interpreted to mean that liturgical norms mean very little and, worse, that liturgy means very little.  Thus, we move deeper into a brave new antinomian world.  I suspect, however, that if you were to choose to make it up as you go (disobey) in the traditional direction rather than in the innovative direction, the world would be brought down on your head.

Fourth, see number two, above.

The moderation queue is ON.   Please keep the spittle-flecked nutties to yourselves.  I have enough of that in my email. Thanks in advance.

 

UPDATE:

His Excellency Most Rev. Robert C. Morlino, Bishop of Madison (where I am), stated (HERE) the following:

 

 

“I accept this change with loving obedience, as I always would,” Morlino said of the pope’s decision.

Local priests are now free to include women, Morlino said. But they can also still opt to skip the ritual altogether — it has always been optional — or “follow the traditional practice” of washing only male feet, which recalls Jesus having done so for his 12 male apostles, he said.

In a diocese where many progressive Catholics had found the male-only rule disagreeable, Morlino added that he hoped people will avoid “pressure tactics” and allow priests to make “good and prudential” decisions as to how they want to proceed.

“It is my hope that in their outstanding care for the people entrusted to them, the priests will engage serious prayer and reflection in coming to their choice of option,” Morlino said.

I provide this because I, too, am quoted in that article. The writer, predictably, tried to set my viewagainst that of the local bishop.  Fine.  We’ve seen this game before.

I freely admit that I don’t like this decision from Pope Francis, for the reasons I stated above.  That said, I do not deny the juridical authority of the Supreme Pontiff to change liturgical law, good idea or not.  Also, I will not now say that priests who make the decision in the future to include females in the wholly optional Mandatum are violating the law.  I won’t think it is a good idea, but they won’t – now – be violating the law. That doesn’t change the fact that, if they did it in the past, they were then blatantly violating the law.

His Excellency Bp. Morlino has the heavy mandate of guiding a diocese in charity according to the laws of the Church and in unity with the Successor of Peter.  His desire to act always in harmony with the liturgical law is edifying.  He did not ignore or violate liturgical law before this decision and he is not going to ignore or violate liturgical law now.  He is admirably consistent in this matter as in other liturgical matters.  Also, note well that his remarks reveal the respect that he has for the freedom of priests to make their choices within the bounds of the law.  Again, admirably consistent.

 

UPDATE 22 Jan:

My friend Fr. Ray Blake has the following:

I apologise of all the faithful and beseech their prayers who in my misconceived arrogance have been excluded by my legalism.
I apologise in particular to those ladies who would have liked to have had their feet washed at the Mandatum on Holy Thursday and were excluded by my rigourism.
I apologise, you were right and I was wrong.
I apologise for teaching that this Rite was about Christ washing the feet of those twelve chosen to be Apostles rather than seeing it as a Rite that expressed Christ’s care for the world and for sinners and for the poor. I apologise for suggesting that this Rite was about Christ’s priesthood and the Apostles participation in it, I apologise for suggesting that this Rite was in any sense hieratic. I apologise for quoting the Pope Emeritus, and the schismatic Patriarchs of Constantinople and Moscow in a sermon about this Rite. They were obviously misunderstood by me or were dealing with their own local situation. I was wrong, I was also mistaken. I humbly ask anyone who has been misinformed by me to in future to disregard any teaching I might have given at any time, and especially if I have claimed that it was the Church’s teaching.
I apologise too to the poor, I apologise to those my brother clergy who chose to ignore the written Law of the Church but nevertheless had the spiritual insight to understand the Spirit of the Law.
I have indeed been a Neo-Pelagian Promethean and I humbly promise in future to follow custom rather than any directives coming from the Holy See or printed in the Missal. I will indeed do my best to not to teach but to set people free to follow their own lights and inspiration.
I am humbly grateful for this change in the Church’s law, though because of the increasing stiffness in my knees for the last few years I have been unable to wash the feet of anyone.

One of the comments under his post was especially interesting…

Pétrus said…
Father, if you want to hold to the spirit of the Holy Father (and follow his own personal example) you should ignore the new communication from the CDW. Following it would be nothing other than legalism.

Read the whole thing there.

 

UPDATE 22 Jan:

There is a good post from Joseph Shaw of the Latin Mass Society in England. HERE

The Mandatum: let’s not be hard on Pope Francis

It is tempting to see the decree allowing women’s feet to be washed on Maundy Thursday as an indication of an acceleration of liturgical decay underway with Pope Francis, following his breaking of the rule up to now. However, what has happened is no different from what happened under his predecessors.

[… He gives examples from Pope Francis’ predecessors…]

Let’s not get on a high horse about Pope Francis at this juncture. This is just another step, and not a particularly large one, in the development of the Ordinary Form away from Tradition, and it is not happening because of the personality of the Pope.

 

 

 

It is happening because the Novus Ordo Missae of 1970 was unstable. It included a series of compromises which were never going to last. Given the direction of pressure, these compromises were always going to unravel the same way.

This is the real lesson to be learned. Attempting to shore up the totering edifice of the Novus Ordo with ferocious-sounding rules has failed. JPII and Pope Benedict didn’t manage it, and obviously – obviously – Pope Francis, though not a liturgical ‘meddler’, is not going to succeed in a project in which he has no interest. If it is collapsing, it is collapsing under the weight of its own contradictions.

 

There are 103 readers’ responses to this blog of Fr. Zuhlsdorf, one of which says:

I agree with canonist Ed Peters when he commented on facebook that it is a good thing that this issue has ben settled and we dont go though the farce of the Pope going against his own liturgical law. However that it has been settled with this decision makes me sad for two reasons:

Firstly because there is a beauty and depth of the person of christ, in the priest, washing the feet of those men who he chose to act in his person, to be his body and to celebrate the sacrifice of his death, and indeed to sacrifice themselves for him. Indeed I liked the idea of the bishop washing the feet of his priests at the chrism Mass. That seemed fitting to me. That a priest washes the feet of some people from the parish because of ‘service’ doesnt carry that same depth to me.

Secondly, it’s a dreadful idea to change a law because people are breaking a law already. The rights and wrongs of his particular situation aside, the only fruits of indulging disobedience is further disobedience. At some point the Pope will want these people to be obedient to him, and he will find that they pay him no attention, because he himself rewarded their disobedience in this issue by giving them their way. One thing the Church doesnt need more of is emboldended dissenters, or powerless Popes whose line of credit in the bank of authority has run dry.

 

 

Law catching up with practice, again. Pope Francis Allows Women to Holy Thursday Foot-Washing

http://www.associationofcatholicpriests.ie/2016/01/law-catching-up-with-practice-again/

By Fr. Anthony Ruff, OSB January 22, 2016

Pope Francis made the news, and raised eyebrows, when he washed the feet of women, including non-Christians, at Holy Thursday Mass immediately after being elected pope – not least because the rules only allowed for the feet of men to be washed. Now the Holy See has issued a decree making official what he – and many other priests around the world – had been already doing in contravention of the official rule.

The decree was issued today by the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, the Vatican’s liturgy department which has Cardinal Robert Sarah as its head.

Pope Francis also wrote a letter to Cardinal Sarah regarding the changes.

As NCR reports, the previous wording about “men” is to be changed to this:

Those chosen from among the People of God are accompanied by the ministers’ (and consequently in the Caeremoniale EpiscoporumNo. 301 and No. 299 b referring to the seats for the chosen men, so that pastors may choose a group of faithful representing the variety and unity of every part of the People of God. This group may consist of men and women, and ideally of the young and the old, healthy and sick, clerics, consecrated persons and laypeople.

Look for much to be made of two words in that passage: “may” and “ideally.” Note that women may be included, but there is no obligation to do so and one may still include only males. But note that ideally the group should be diverse and representative of the People of God. But does “ideally” only refer to the second part of the sentence, and not the first part saying that women may be admitted?

And then there is “People of God.” Does that include only Christians? Only Catholics? Or all God’s people of any religion (including Islam)?

I also expect much discussion about how significant the change is. Is this a real turning point and a sign of significant movement at high official levels? Or is too much being made about a rather insignificant matter? Either view has merits, whatever side of the issue you’re on.

And of course there is the important question of how liturgical law functions and how it should be interpreted. One school of thought says that it may well be legitimate to wash women’s feet – if the rules allow for it. According to this line of thinking, Pope Francis should have changed the rule first, and then changed the practice. Otherwise he’s modeling a cavalier attitude toward the Church’s norms.

But on the other side, some people would say that Francis’s violation of a liturgical rule for pastoral reasons was itself a good model for the whole church. It sent the right kind of message to those who are overly legalistic and think that the Roman Curia ought to micromanage every liturgical practice in the whole world.

For those people, we’ve now lost the sign value of a Pope admirably violating the rules for pastoral reasons. With today’s decree, rules and practice will again be in sync when Francis celebrates Holy Thursday.

Be that as it may, I’m pretty sure Francis has already made clear in many ways what he thinks about people who put rules above all else.

Readers have left 8 responses

 

 

 

Vatican Congregation: Pastors free to avoid foot washing

http://www.churchmilitant.com/news/article/vatican-congregation-pastors-free-to-avoid-foot-washing

By Christine Niles ChurchMilitant.com, Vatican City, January 22, 2016

It’s not mandatory, nor should it become the central focus of the Holy Thursday liturgy

The Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments is telling pastors they are free to reject the Holy Thursday foot washing if it’s not suitable in their circumstances.

In an article published Friday in L’Osservatore Romano, the Vatican’s official newspaper, Arthur Roche, Secretary of the Congregation for Divine Worship, clarifies Pope Francis’ new liturgical norms for foot washing, which now allows women to participate in the rite. 

The Pope had sent the new norms in December 2014 to Cdl. Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation, but the letter decreeing the change was only published Thursday. Although the previous rule had limited the footwashing to men only, the rule was widely ignored in many dioceses.

Roche explains that the footwashing rite is not required, and that pastors have the freedom to determine whether or not the rite should take place in their parish. 

“The washing of feet is not mandatory at the Holy Thursday Mass,” Roche explains. “Pastors are to evaluate its suitability according to circumstances and pastoral reasons so that it doesn’t become automatic or artificial, lacking in meaning…”

Neither should pastors go in the opposite direction and make the rite the central focus of the liturgy such that it “take[s] away attention due to the Lord’s Supper at Mass.”

Roche walks through the history of the footwashing rite, which began in the early centuries as an act in imitation of Our Lord, as well as an expression of sacrificial service. In the seventh century, it was the bishop who washed the feet of priests in his residence. In later centuries, 12 subdeacons were chosen for the rite, although that number was not specifically mentioned in the 1570 Roman Missal.

The 1600 Ceremonial of Bishops mandated that the bishop wash the feet of 13 poor, but the rule was revised later to limit footwashing to priests. In 1955, Pope Pius XII revised the rule to allow the priest to wash 12 men’s feet.

Although the original rule limiting the footwashing ceremony only to men was significant for its “imitative value” of Our Lord’s washing the feet of the Apostles, Roche explains that the new rule now places the emphasis on Christ’s sacrificial love toward all mankind.

 

 

Not everybody wants to wash women’s feet on Holy Thursday

http://www.cruxnow.com/church/2016/01/27/not-all-are-on-board-with-pope-francis-decision-to-include-women-in-foot-washing/

By Michael O’Loughlin, January 27, 2016

If you’re looking forward to seeing women and girls take part in the Holy Thursday foot-washing ritual in your parish — now that the pope has said it’s okay to include them — hold on. The decision has inflamed the so-called liturgy wars, and appears to be the latest in the Catholic right’s dissatisfaction with Pope Francis.

Reaction to the pope’s decision that a wider spectrum of people be included in the ritual to reflect the entire community was fast and furious from some Latin Mass enthusiasts and folks disenchanted with liturgical changes arising from Vatican II.

Francis himself has already included women in the ritual, which is based on the story of Jesus washing the feet of his 12 apostles, every year since his 2013 election as pope. As some noted Thursday, the situation boils down to the pope:

They criticised @Pontifex for breaking the rules when he washed women’s feet. So he changed the rules. https://twitter.com/johnlallenjr/status/690172560382791681 …
Austen Ivereigh

But this change shouldn’t cause major waves in the United States, as many bishops here have permitted priests to include women in the service for decades, and the US Conference of Catholic Bishops gave the practice its tacit approval in 1987.

Not all bishops have permitted the practice, however.

Bishop Robert C. Morlino of Madison, Wisconsin, for example, continued to prohibit women from being part of the ritual—until yesterday.

And while he said in a Thursday statement that he accepted the pope’s new rule “with loving obedience,” he pointed out that priests could stick to business as usual, or even drop the ritual altogether if they didn’t want to include women.

Priests in his diocese have the option “to include women in the washing of the feet … to follow the traditional practice of washing the feet of men, who in this dramatic ritual represent the Twelve Apostles [or] to omit the ritual of the washing of the feet altogether.”

Some priests seem to be gravitating toward door No. 3.

“Thankfully it is optional. So I will never perform the rite again,” the Rev. Bede Rowe, a priest based in the United Kingdom, wrote on his personal blog.

Another British priest, the Rev. Ray Blake, wrote on his blog that he stopped doing the ritual in 2013, when Pope Francis chose to include women and non-Christians in the ceremony. And he won’t start it up again.

“Here, since the ambiguity of the Pope’s first Holy Thursday and my own increasing inability to get up and down 12 times, it really does hurt, I chose not wash feet then and haven’t done since,” he wrote Friday.

Other conservatives worry that the changes could lead to women’s ordination. They point to the symbolism of the ritual, which many interpret as Jesus washing the feet of his 12 apostles.

 

https://twitter.com/michaelbd/status/690199589635411968

Joseph Shaw, head of the Latin Mass Society of England and Wales, agreed.

In a statement released Thursday, he wrote that the change “reinforces the trend which has seen priests increasingly surrounded by women during Mass, serving, doing the readings, and as Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion.”

“This inevitably makes the all-male priesthood itself harder to understand,” he said.

Francis has consistently said women’s ordination is off the table, suggesting that Pope John Paul II’s teaching on the matter is infallible, meaning he does not have the power to change the rules.

Shaw also fears that including women could be viewed sexually.

“An important aspect, which is generally neglected is the question of the etiquette of men washing the feet of women,” he wrote. “This would have been considered inappropriate only a few decades ago in the West, and such a view persists in many cultures.”

The Rev. Kevin M. Cusick, pastor of St. Francis de Sales Church in Maryland, concurred:

Exactly the reason why it’s inappropriate for priest to wash women’s feet; unless she’s his “girlfriend” https://twitter.com/roratecaeli/status/690206450392633345 …

For his part, Madison’s Morlino hopes that whatever priests in diocese decide to do, that they aren’t pressured from either side in this latest salvo in the liturgy wars.

“It is my hope that in their outstanding care for the people entrusted to them, the priests will engage serious prayer and reflection in coming to their choice of option,” he wrote. “It is also my hope that our priests and people will avoid any pressure tactics so as to allow our priests to make good and prudential decisions.”

 

 

This ministry commenced writing on this issue in 2011, a full 2 years before the eruption of this controversy:

WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON HOLY THURSDAY
APRIL 2011/APRIL 2012/17/28/29 MARCH/2 APRIL/JULY 2013 93 pages

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_HOLY_THURSDAY.doc

 

UPDATE

The Latin Rite Indian Bishops (and their Conference, the CCBI) who have otherwise not communicated to the faithful information about any other important Encyclical, Apostolic Letter, Motu Proprio, Decree or Document (for example those on Liturgy, Eastern Meditation, New Age, etc.) hastily released this Circular:

Circular on Maundy Thursday Washing of the Feet

http://archdioceseofbombay.org/news/diocesan/circular-maundy-thursday-washing-feet
March 9, 2016
To: All Member Bishops
Conference of the Catholic Bishops of India
Your Eminence / Grace / Excellency,
On the first Maundy Thursday service after his election as Bishop of Rome, Pope Francis washed the feet of several inmates at one of Rome’s prisons. There was great wonderment because among those whose feet he washed were some girls and some not belonging to the Catholic faith. Although the Vatican Spokesman, Fr. Federico Lombardi, said that this was not to be taken as a changing the discipline of the Church, it is now clear that the Holy Father was giving a message.
After some reflection, Pope Francis has given directions to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments to issue a Decree, In Missa In Cena Domini*, making some changes in the regulations for the Washing of the Feet. The Instructions makes the following changes:
1. The previous Document prescribed that the feet of 12 men be washed. Now this is changed to “people of God.” Hence, the prescription to wash only the feet of men no longer holds. Women too could be part of the group whose feet are washed.
2. Earlier the number of people whose feet were to be washed was specified as 12 (12 men). In the new Decree, the number is not specified. It simply says “the pastor may select a small group of the faithful.”
3. The Instruction gives an example of those who could form part of the group, “men and women, and it is appropriate that they consist of people young and the old, healthy and sick, clerics, consecrated persons and lay people”. Evidently the group, both the number and composition, would vary from parish to parish. For example, in some parishes there may not be clerics available to form part of the group. So one should not go out of the way to make sure that each of these categories are part of the group.
4. The Decree states that the group will “represent the variety and unity of each part of the people of God.” Again, each of our parishes could have a different composition and this should be kept in mind when choosing the members of the group.
While the number 12 which was earlier specified is no longer prescriptive, I do think this was a logistically convenient number and we must keep this in mind. Having too big a number would disturb the service and on the other hand, having too small a number might not give the Washing of the Feet its adequate significance.
In the Archdiocese of Bombay I have made the following suggestion to our Priests
“Although this is not mentioned in the Decree, I would recommend that some poor / underprivileged / disadvantaged people also form part of the group. This will bring out more clearly the meaning of Our Lord’s action of humility and charity in the Washing of the Feet.”

 


Each Diocesan Bishop might want to make some suggestion to the priests, according to the local context.
If you foresee some difficulty or resistance to the change, you could consider whether discussing this matter with your Parish Pastoral Council and getting their assistance in deciding the composition of the group might help.
Finally the Decree also asks that both those whose feet are washed as well as the others are instructed about the service. We usually do this in the homily. This year’s change might be good opportunity to explain the message more in detail.
Wishing you a very holy Triduum in preparation for a Happy Easter and with kind regards and best wishes,
Yours fraternally in Christ,
OSWALD CARDINAL GRACIAS
Archbishop of Bombay & President, Conference of the Catholic Bishops of India

*http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/ccdds/documents/rc_con_ccdds_doc_20160106_decreto-lavanda-piedi_en.html, http://ephesians-511.net/docs/IN_MISSA_IN_CENA_DOMINI.doc

 

The Cardinal’s circular prompted a very knowledgeable Catholic to write to me:

Subject: Is the abomination of desolation already in the Catholic Church now?

Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 16:16:41 +0530

Dear Michael,
What is your opinion on this? Mine is clear from the subject I assigned to this email. In my parish the group whose feet will be washed is consisting of male and female participants. There is no opposition whatsoever to this that I have heard of. The celebrant priest will now have to kiss the feet of women after washing since this is part of the ritual.

 

It is very well known, and placed on record with documentation in several of my reports (listed below; the files most closely concerned with the Archdiocese of Bombay are in red colour font) that Cardinal Oswald Gracias has allowed his archdiocese to become the headquarters of feminists and lay women “theologians” who operate the Indian arm of the UK-based womenpriests organization led by ex-priest John Wijngaards and his ex-nun wife. One of them, Astrid Lobo Gajiwala who worships Hindu deities in her home, is on the editorial board of The Examiner, Bombay’s archdiocesan weekly, and teaches at seminaries! They and the radical feminist nuns who dominate the Ecclesia of Women in Asia (EWA) surely must be celebrating.

The Cardinal need not have troubled himself. While prior to 2013 and Pope Francis, a few enterprising priests have included a woman or two in the line-up for foot washing, after the last two Maundy Thursdays I have received complaints from all over India and also from the Gulf states stating that priests were washing the feet of women during the services a la Pope Francis. From here on, with the Pope making it licit and the President of the CBCI asking priests to follow suit, one can expect liturgical surprises come Holy Thursday.

While Pope Francis did not elaborate in his decree on the number of people whose feet were to be washed (he simply said till now there were twelve men whose feet were washed during the Mass of the Lord’s Supper), Cardinal Oswald Gracias waxes eloquent about 12 being “a logistically convenient number“, etc.:

While the number 12 which was earlier specified is no longer prescriptive, I do think this was a logistically convenient number and we must keep this in mind. Having too big a number would disturb the service and on the other hand, having too small a number might not give the Washing of the Feet its adequate significance.

There is no mention by the Cardinal that Jesus Christ washed the feet of his 12 apostles at the Last Supper (not even His Blessed Mother was present at the institution of the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist!), and in doing so, He was preparing the men to a life of serving others in their priesthood (John 13).

Therefore this is just one example of the tragic situation that has enveloped the Universal Church today.

It was at this same occasion that Jesus instituted the Sacrament of Holy Orders, “giving the Apostles and their successors the power to say Mass … the power to offer the sacrifice of the Mass” (My Catholic Faith by Bishop Louis LaRavoire Morrow, Bishop of Krishnagar, India, 1936, page 346).

The Pope knows this very well.

The pro-women’s ordination feminists know this equally well.

And that’s the reason why they must be celebrating.

And that’s also the reason why including women in the ritual is a very, very bad move by the Pope.

Francis violated the law (rubrics) … then in the face of three years of orthodox criticism … he changed it!

Is it a case of the law catching up with practice? Or of the law being adjusted to accommodate the practice?

 

The Pope appears to have left one of his foot-washing adventures unwashed during his legitimization of it: his decree states that the ritual may now be performed for the “People of God” meaning, hopefully, those who have been baptized. But in 2013, the National Catholic Reporter as well as a Vatican statement said that two of the prison inmates whose feet he washed were Muslims (of which one was a woman). People of God?

One can only imagine what will be attempted in our parish churches from now on.

 

 

Cardinal Sarah Indicates Priests Do Not Have to Wash the Feet of Women

http://www.onepeterfive.com/cardinal-sarah-indicates-priests-do-not-have-to-wash-the-feet-of-women/

By Steve Skojec, March 15, 2016

 

 

Today, it was announced that Pope Francis will wash the feet of 12 refugees (no mention how many will be Catholic) this Holy Thursday. The Holy Father is no stranger to innovations in the rite, and today’s announcement follows on the heels of official changes made by the pope in January, altering the rubrics of the Holy Thursday liturgical practice of foot washing in a way that was compatible with his own annual deviations from the proper form. At the time, Rorate Caeli‘s Augustinus opined:

 

When, within two weeks of his election, Francis chose to include women (including a Muslim) among the “viri” whose feet he washed as part of the Maundy Thursday Mass, we immediately grasped its significance and posted that it was The Official End of the Reform of the Reform – by example. He repeated the inclusion of women in the foot-washing rite in 2014 and 2015, which could only have meant that he desired to normalize the practice. Today’s reform was inevitable. It was only a matter of time.

We predict that before long, like many other “options” such as communion in the hand, female altar boys, “extraordinary” ministers of holy communion and “ad populum” celebrations, having women take part in the Maundy Thursday washing of the feet will become virtually obligatory, with the priests who refuse it being stigmatized as “reactionaries” and punished in a variety of ways.

Francis pushing this decree through Robert Cardinal Sarah is another reminder that, no matter what the highest officials of the CDW say and do in their private capacity, it is still the express will of the Pope that matters in the end. Beautiful reflections, edifying personal example and words of encouragement are no substitutes for clear legislation. As long as the “Reform of the Reform” is not embodied in clear legislation that is vigorously enforced from the very top, it will never take off the ground and will never be more than the hobby of a tiny minority. No amount of brave talk from a handful of bloggers will change this.

 

Bishop Athanasius Schneider then weighed in, making clear the problem with this change to the ritual:

A typical Catholic parish priest should know well the perennial sense of the Catholic faith, the perennial sense as well of the laws of the Catholic liturgy and, knowing this, he should have an interior sureness and firmness. He should always remember the Catholic principle of discernment: “Quod semper, quod ubique, quod ab omnibus”, i.e. “What has been always, everywhere and from all” believed and practiced.

The categories “always, everywhere, all” are not to be understood in an arithmetical, but in a moral sense. A concrete criterion for discernment is this: “Does this change in a doctrinal affirmation, in a pastoral or in a liturgical practice constitute a rupture with the centuries-old, or even with the millennial past? And does this innovation really make the faith shine clearer and brighter? Does this liturgical innovation bring to us closer the sanctity of God, or manifest deeper and more beautiful the Divine mysteries? Does this disciplinary innovation really increase a greater zeal for the holiness of life?”

As concretely to the innovation of washing the feet of women during the Holy Mass of the Last Supper on Holy Thursday: This Holy Mass celebrates the commemoration of the institution of the sacraments of the Eucharist and the Priesthood. Therefore, the foot washing of women along with the men not only distracts from the main focus on Eucharist and on Priesthood, but generates confusion regarding the historical symbolism of the “twelve” and of the apostles being of male sex.The universal tradition of the Church never allowed the foot washing during the Holy Mass, but instead outside of Mass, in a special ceremony.

By the way: the public washing and usually also kissing of the feet of women on the part of a man, in our case, of a priest or a bishop, is considered by every person of common sense in all cultures as being improper and even indecent. Thanks be to God no priest or bishop is obliged to wash publicly the feet of women on Holy Thursday, for there is no binding norm for it, and the foot washing itself is only facultative.

 

Now today, 1P5 contributor Maike Hickson offers an informal statement at The Wanderer, obtained from Cardinal Robert Sarah himself, under whose purview (as prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship & the Discipline of the Sacraments) this change in discipline lies, about what individual priests should do this Holy Week. This question is of particular importance if (as Hickson reports is already happening) their bishops are trying to impose the changes from on high:

After a couple of priests contacted me and asked me to help them receive an authoritative clarification from Robert Cardinal Sarah himself, so that they might be assured of their own spiritual freedom to decide for themselves to include only men into the rite of the Washing of the Feet, I asked Vatican correspondent Edward Pentin for help in this matter.

Pentin was able to speak with Cardinal Sarah who made a statement to Pentin according to which it is up to the individual celebrant to decide whom he invites to participate in the washing of the feet in the liturgy of Holy Thursday. As Pentin put it in an e-mail to me: “He [Cardinal Sarah] simply said that each bishop and priest ‘has to decide in accord with his own conscience, and according to the purpose for which the Lord instituted this feast.’ So in other words, by no means does a priest have to wash the feet of women.”

 

 

I consider this clarification to be important and intend to make it known to as many priests as possible. I know that others are trying to receive a more official statement from Cardinal Sarah, but due to the lack of time, I decided to get this information out into the public.

 

The question, as always, is what the practical upshot of this will be. Barring an official statement from the head of the CDW, individual priests will “decide in accord with [their] own conscience” at their own peril. Even if Cardinal Sarah made this official Vatican policy (and wasn’t sacked for it), the odds that a priest who had such changes imposed on him from the chancery could make a successful appeal to Rome after being disciplined for disobedience are not encouraging.

And yet, this is exactly what priests in this situation should do. They should resist. They should follow their conscience. They should make clear “the purpose for which the Lord instituted this feast.” And if necessary, they should endure punishment. The time for compromise is long since past. An unjust order is no order at all, and the time to come forward and stand up for the truth — as I said in today’s podcast– is now. If we don’t all start being more committed to God than man, we’re going to be swept away.

For what it’s worth, any priest who makes such a stand can feel free to contact me with the details and any repercussions. I can’t promise resolution, but I won’t let your story go quietly into the dark.

This Holy Week, what do you say we all join together and worship Christ, instead of ourselves or the zeitgeist? Isn’t it past time?

CORRECTION: In the original post title, I mistakenly attributed the quote, “by no means does a priest have to wash the feet of women” to Cardinal Sarah. This was an interpretation of the clear import of his words by Edward Pentin, and not a direct quote. I’ve updated the title to reflect this change.

 

ON FEMINISM, WOMEN PRIESTS, ORDINATION OF WOMEN

ARCHBISHOP OF DELHI SUPPORTS WOMEN’S ORDINATION

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/ARCHBISHOP_OF_DELHI_SUPPORTS_WOMENS_ORDINATION.doc

CHURCH CITIZENS VOICE OF DR JAMES KOTTOOR IS LIBERAL AND NEW AGE

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/CHURCH_CITIZENS_VOICE_OF_DR_JAMES_KOTTOOR_IS_LIBERAL_AND_NEW_AGE.doc

COMPANION INDIA-WHY I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND THIS MAGAZINE TO CATHOLICS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/COMPANION_INDIA-WHY_I_WOULD_NOT_RECOMMEND_THIS_MAGAZINE_TO_CATHOLICS.doc

EXCOMMUNICATED WOMAN PRIEST MINISTERS IN BENEDICTINE MONASTERY

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/EXCOMMUNICATED_WOMAN_PRIEST_MINISTERS_IN_BENEDICTINE_MONASTERY.doc

FEMINIST NUN CRITICIZES THE CHURCH ON NATIONAL TELEVISION

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/FEMINIST_NUN_CRITICIZES_THE_CHURCH_ON_NATIONAL_TELEVISION.doc

NEW COMMUNITY BIBLE 15-DEMAND FOR ORDINATION OF WOMEN PRIESTS-FR SUBHASH ANAND AND OTHERS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/NEW_COMMUNITY_BIBLE_15-DEMAND_FOR_ORDINATION_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS-FR_SUBHASH_ANAND_AND_OTHERS.doc

POPE FRANCIS SAYS NO TO WOMEN PRIESTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/POPE_FRANCIS_SAYS_NO_TO_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc

QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 08-CONSULTOR TO THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE PRACTISES NEW AGE ADVOCATES THE HERESY OF WOMEN PRIESTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_08-CONSULTOR_TO_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_PRACTISES_NEW_AGE_ADVOCATES_THE_HERESY_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc

RADICAL FEMINISM AND THE ORDINATION OF WOMEN

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/RADICAL_FEMINISM_AND_THE_ORDINATION_OF_WOMEN.doc

UCAN WANTS TO DO AWAY WITH THE PRIESTHOOD

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/UCAN_WANTS_TO_DO_AWAY_WITH_THE_PRIESTHOOD.doc

UCAN CONFIRMS IT FAVOURS WOMEN PRIESTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/UCAN_CONFIRMS_IT_FAVOURS_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc

UCAN CONFIRMS IT FAVOURS WOMEN PRIESTS-02

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/UCAN_CONFIRMS_IT_FAVOURS_WOMEN_PRIESTS-02.doc

UCAN CONFIRMS IT FAVOURS WOMEN PRIESTS-03

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/UCAN_CONFIRMS_IT_FAVOURS_WOMEN_PRIESTS-03.doc

VIRGINIA SALDANHA-ECCLESIA OF WOMEN IN ASIA AND CATHERINE OF SIENA VIRTUAL COLLEGE-FEMINIST THEOLOGY AND THE ORDINATION OF WOMEN PRIESTS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/VIRGINIA_SALDANHA-ECCLESIA_OF_WOMEN_IN_ASIA_AND_CATHERINE_OF_SIENA_VIRTUAL_COLLEGE-FEMINIST_THEOLOGY_AND_THE_ORDINATION_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc

VIRGINIA SALDANHA-WOMENPRIESTS INFILTRATES THE INDIAN CHURCH-CATHERINE OF SIENA VIRTUAL COLLEGE

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/VIRGINIA_SALDANHA-WOMENPRIESTS_INFILTRATES_THE_INDIAN_CHURCH-CATHERINE_OF_SIENA_VIRTUAL_COLLEGE.doc

WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON HOLY THURSDAY

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_HOLY_THURSDAY.doc

WOMEN PRIESTS-THE NCR-UCAN-EWA NEXUS

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/WOMEN_PRIESTS-THE_NCR-UCAN-EWA_NEXUS.doc

WHAT’S VIRGINIA SALDANHA DOING WITH “NUNS ON THE BUS”?

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/WHATS_VIRGINIA_SALDANHA_DOING_WITH_NUNS_ON_THE_BUS.doc

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EPHESIANS-511.NET- A Roman Catholic Ministry Exposing Errors in the Indian Church Michael Prabhu, METAMORPHOSE, #12,Dawn Apartments, 22,Leith Castle South Street, Chennai – 600 028, Tamilnadu, India. Phone: +91 (44) 24611606 E-mail: michaelprabhu@vsnl.net, http://www.ephesians-511.net

EPHESIANS-511.NET- A Roman Catholic Ministry Exposing Errors in the Indian Church

Michael Prabhu, METAMORPHOSE, #12,Dawn Apartments, 22,Leith Castle South Street, Chennai - 600 028, Tamilnadu, India. Phone: +91 (44) 24611606 E-mail: michaelprabhu@vsnl.net, http://www.ephesians-511.net

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