WOMEN PRIESTS-THE NCR-UCAN-EWA NEXUS



JANUARY 24, 2013/JANUARY 31, 2013

Women priests: The NCR-UCAN-EWA nexus

INTRODUCTION

John Paul II placed a total ban on
women priests, which is also valid for future popes.
He formulated it with the words of infallible proclamations, “ex cathedra.”

Source:
http://chiesa.espresso.repubblica.it/articolo/28889?eng=y

The pope ruled then … in his 1994 apostolic letter “Ordinatio Sacerdotalis” on reserving priestly ordination to men alone … that the Church does not have the authority to ordain women as priests, and excluded the possibility of doing so in the future.

Source: http://archives.ucanews.com/2001/09/19/the-vatican-rules-out-ordination-of-women-as-deacons.

The 1994 Vatican document “Ordinatio Sacerdotalis” concentrates on three basic points, Pia de Solenni [director of Life and Women’s Issues at the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C.] explained: “Christ, in ordaining only men, acted freely without constraints by cultural norms; non-admission to the priesthood is not a sign of lesser dignity; the Church does not have the faculty to ordain women.”

Source: http://www.zenit.org/article-19534?l=english

Pope Benedict XVI made subtle references to the movement from the Church’s extreme left wing to open the priesthood to women and to married men. Among the opening lines of his homily, Pope Benedict laid out the nature of the priesthood, saying it is not a matter of mere functionality but a sacramental reality derived from Christ himself.

Source: http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/archive//ldn/2010/jun/10061116

Under the new rules, attempted ordination of women is in the same category as clerical sex abuse of minors, heresy and schism. The new rules state that those who attempt to ordain women and women who seek ordination will automatically be excommunicated.

Source:
http://www.msmagazine.com/news/uswirestory.asp?ID=12513

Last year, this ministry published two detailed reports on the movement for the ordination of women in the Indian Church. The titles and links of the reports are

VIRGINIA SALDANHA-ECCLESIA OF WOMEN IN ASIA AND CATHERINE OF SIENA VIRTUAL COLLEGE-FEMINIST THEOLOGY AND THE ORDINATION OF WOMEN PRIESTS
MARCH/APRIL/MAY 2012

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/VIRGINIA_SALDANHA-ECCLESIA_OF_WOMEN_IN_ASIA_AND_CATHERINE_OF_SIENA_VIRTUAL_COLLEGE-FEMINIST_THEOLOGY_AND_THE_ORDINATION_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc

VIRGINIA SALDANHA-WOMENPRIESTS INFILTRATES THE INDIAN CHURCH-CATHERINE OF SIENA VIRTUAL
COLLEGE
MARCH/APRIL 2012

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/VIRGINIA_SALDANHA-WOMENPRIESTS_INFILTRATES_THE_INDIAN_CHURCH-CATHERINE_OF_SIENA_VIRTUAL_COLLEGE.doc

The following three related reports will also be of interest to the reader:

NEW COMMUNITY BIBLE 15-DEMAND FOR ORDINATION OF WOMEN PRIESTS-FR SUBHASH ANAND AND OTHERS
APRIL 2010/JULY 2010/APRIL 2012

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/NEW_COMMUNITY_BIBLE_15-DEMAND_FOR_ORDINATION_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS-FR_SUBHASH_ANAND_AND_OTHERS.doc

COMPANION INDIA-WHY I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND THIS MAGAZINE TO CATHOLICS
APRIL 2012

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/COMPANION_INDIA-WHY_I_WOULD_NOT_RECOMMEND_THIS_MAGAZINE_TO_CATHOLICS.doc

[The COMPANION INDIA report will soon be updated.]

ARCHBISHOP OF DELHI SUPPORTS WOMEN’S ORDINATION 2 FEBRUARY 2013

http://ephesians-511.net/docs/ARCHBISHOP_OF_DELHI_SUPPORTS_WOMENS_ORDINATION.doc

1.

The mentioned “movement for the ordination of women” in the Indian Church operates subtly and almost invisibly, except for those in the know or for those who sincerely want to accept the truth of its malevolent and heretical existence.

It is definitely discernible to the Catholic prelate, priest or lay person who can see through the subterfuge and semantics that accompany its steady infiltration of the Body of Christ.

For instance, in the liberal Mangalorean Catholics yahoo group there is a Dominican priest, Fr. Claude Saldanha, who posts the articles of feminist nuns writing from the USA along with a lot of other anti-Catholic material. Then, there’s journalist Allwyn Fernandes of Crisis Communications, also a member of Mangalorean Catholics and a Contributing Editor of Companion India who is a sympathizer of the “movement”. Next, there’s a bevy of feminist nuns, many of whom are the Indian Church’s first women theologians, whose writings appear with ever-increasing frequency in Catholic magazines like Bombay archdiocese’s The Examiner, Chennai’s The New Leader, etc. There is also a small coterie of religious brothers and priests who empathize with them and express their sentiments on the internet through “news items” from organizations like the Conference of Religious, India [CRI] and the Union of Catholic Asian News [UCAN] which espouse their cause.

Others, like Fr. Subhash Anand, use group mailing to further the agenda. Last but not the least, there are two powerful and influential lay women whom the Church in Bombay has mysteriously accorded the status of “theologian”. They are Virginia Saldanha and Astrid Lobo Gajiwala, who have “preached” to Cardinals and Bishops at the national as well as Asian level. While Gajiwala is virtually a non-Catholic, or at best a lapsed or non-practising Catholic, [the detailed report on Gajiwala which
is overdue for release will substantiate those claims] Virginia Saldanha has served at very senior executive levels in the archdiocesan, national as well as Asian Bishops’ Conferences.

Notwithstanding the exposure of their insidious programmes and heretical writings by this ministry in the above 2012 reports which were mailed to the Bishops concerned, Astrid Lobo Gajiwala is retained on the editorial board of The Examiner [she was inducted in November 2011], while Virginia Saldanha [Women’s Issues – since December 2010] and Fr. Subhash Anand [Indian Philosophy and Religions] are, like Allwyn Fernandes, Contributing Editors of Kochi-based Companion India. Virginia Saldanha and Astrid Lobo Gajiwala write for The Examiner as well as Companion India and ensure that the doors are open for the writings of their feminist-nun friends. What’s more, Virginia Saldanha is a member of the Board of Directors of UCAN!! That makes things clearer on the later pages of this report.

Virginia Saldanha and Astrid Lobo Gajiwala write for The Examiner as well as Companion India. It therefore comes as no surprise that other feminist male theologians like Fr. Subhash Anand are on the same bandwagon. Fr. Jacob Parappally MSFS is a sympathiser of the feminists. He is one of several Indian theologians who critiqued the February 3, 2003 Vatican Document on the ‘New Age’. He too is a Contributing Editor of Companion India as is Fr. Francis Gonsalves, SJ whose writings glorify the New Age and tears down what the Church holds sacred.

A number of articles from this pro-women’s ordination lobby may be found on the internet in the web pages of the radical left-wing National Catholic Reporter [NCR] and its echo UCAN.

This “movement for the ordination of women” in the Indian Church has several organizational faces that cannot be easily linked to the women’s ordination agenda unless one is in the loop or informed or discerning. One such face is the Ecclesia of Women in Asia [EWA], while another is the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians [EATWOT]. Meanwhile, yet another front has emerged, the Catherine of Siena Virtual College. The Catherine of Siena Virtual College is none other than UK-based ex-priest John Wijngaards‘ international movement for women priests. The Catherine of Siena Virtual College has already become affiliated with several seminaries, philosophates and theologates. It purportedly conducts “gender studies”. Similarly, the cover for EWA and EATWOT and all their deliberations, seminars, conferences and writings is either “gender studies” or concerns about gender violence, exploitation of women, empowerment of women, discrimination against women, “space for Catholic women to have their voices heard, thoughts and reflections articulated” [a favourite refrain], the use of gender-sensitive or inclusive language [in Scripture and the liturgy], the “‘searching’ and ‘finding’ of women’s identity“, and so on. But all of that is a smoke screen for their only true agenda: they want women to be ordained as priests.

The reason for this report

Recently there was a spate of articles in the Catholic media on the subject of women priests. I use the term “Catholic” reluctantly because the sites which carried them – the National Catholic Reporter [NCR] and UCAN – are radically anti-Catholic as I have repeatedly documented in my articles and reports.

I have noted – on earlier occasions [see the reports which I have listed] as well as presently – that UCAN, reputedly the largest Asian “Catholic” news agency – is surprisingly quick to print stories, often from the NCR, that faithful Catholics would regard as negative news.

2.

1. Church suffers “ominous division”, says theologian

http://www.ucanindia.in/news/church-suffers-ominous-division-says-theologian/17452/daily

April 9, 2012

Fr Gabriel Daly says one faction has taken control and is presenting its views as those of the whole church.

As controversy over the silencing by the Vatican of Redemptorist priests Fr Tony Flannery and Fr Gerard Moloney grows, an Augustinian priest has written about “an ominous division” in the Catholic Church.

Theologian Fr Gabriel Daly has said “one party is now in control and is presenting its views as ‘the teaching of the church’.”
He continued: “Its more voluble members dismiss those who differ from it as ‘a la carte Catholics’ – a witless enough phrase in a legitimately diverse church.”
Fr Flannery, a founder of the Association of Catholic Priests, has had his monthly column with Reality, the Redemptorists’ monthly magazine, discontinued at Vatican direction, while Fr Moloney, the magazine’s editor, can no longer write on certain issues.
Both priests hold liberal views on contraception, celibacy and women priests.
Writing in the current issue of Doctrine Life magazine, Fr Daly said the secular press unwittingly encouraged such “bad theology” by identifying the Vatican’s Curia and even the bishops, with the Catholic Church, “thus failing to recognize the role of the people of God and legitimate differences in the church.”
He recalled how at the end of the second Vatican Council in 1965, “power once again devolved to the body which was most in need of reform, namely the Vatican Curia, which has slowly but inexorably been re-establishing its former authority.
“The control it exercises is systemic, structural and fiendishly difficult to reform.”

Aided “by secrecy and the unchallenged exercise of power, the Curia has established effective control over the whole church”. Fr Daly observed that “there is little or no concern for those faithful Catholics who are quietly appalled by what is happening. They are seen as simply wrong,” he said.

2. Former nun defies Church to be ordained as priest

http://www.ucanindia.in/news/former-nun-defies-church-to-be-ordained-as-priest/17563/daily

April 12, 2012

A 71-year-old has thrown down a challenge to the concept of all-male Catholic priesthood.

A former nun defied the Catholic Church’s ban on women as priests and went through an ordination ceremony, joining a growing push to crack open the all-male clergy.

A female bishop from Minnesota led Sunday’s ordination ceremony for 71-year-old Maria Thornton McClain at Friedens United Church of Christ on the south side of Indianapolis. McClain said she was a nun for 15 years before leaving her order and has been married to her husband for 31 years. She said she has been a devoted Catholic but believed the ban on female priests needed to be challenged. “Some people call me courageous,” McClain said. “I don’t see myself as courageous. I just feel I’m doing what I’ve been called to do.”

McClain joins more than 100 women around the world already ordained in the Roman Catholic Womenpriests movement.

Pope Benedict XVI this month denounced such movements, saying he had no authority whatsoever to allow female priests because an all-male priesthood was an “irrevocable” church teaching. Greg Otolski, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis, said the Catholic Church traces the all-male clergy to Jesus Christ.

“He only chose 12 apostles, all men,” Otolski said. “He did not choose women, and that’s an unalterable part of the faith, a tradition the church has held and carried on for 2,000 years.”

3. Roman Catholic Women Priests?

http://philippines.ucanews.com/2012/10/15/roman-catholic-women-priests/

October 15, 2012

From the outside looking in, it seems the Vatican would be just as happy to throw all its women ministers under the bus.

First, Rome ordered an investigation of all U.S.-based institutes of Catholic women religious, the sisters most people call “nuns.” Then Rome forced what amounts to a hostile takeover of their largest leadership group, the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR). Then there is the ongoing debate over whether women can be ordained.

The Vatican initiatives toward the sisters—the investigation and the takeover—seem to have met quiet resolves, at least for now. The investigative reports are in the proper Curia office, and the cardinal who called for the study has long retired. LCWR gently rejected a takeover at its August 2012 meeting, and the group’s leaders pledged to start working with the bishop-overseers by explaining what, exactly, it means to be a woman religious. They will meet again this autumn.

An underlying theme of both events echoed the request of a former LCWR president, Mercy Sister
Theresa
Kane
, who in 1979 publicly asked Pope John Paul II to include women in “all ministries” of the church. The code became the coda: ordination of women as priests.

The Catholic Church does not ordain women as priests, and says it never did. Despite volumes of evidence of ordinations of women to the diaconate, the sacred order responsible for the church’s charity, the priesthood has always been a different story.

Why? Well, the priesthood is rooted in the action of Christ with the Apostles: “do this in memory of me”—and until recently Christianity has uniformly agreed that Christ as head of the church must be represented by a male and that the church does not have authority to digress from his choice. In modern times some members of the Anglican Communion and various Protestant denominations have created women priests and pastors, but the Catholic and Orthodox Churches retain their older tradition. 3.

So, who are the Roman Catholic Womenpriests (RCWP)? They say they “stand in prophetic obedience to Jesus who calls women and men to be disciples.” The Catholic Church calls them excommunicated.

SOURCE:

The Washington Post, http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/guest-voices/post/roman-catholic-women-priests/2012/10/12/fada01aa-14bd-11e2-ba83-a7a396e6b2a7_blog.html

4A. Maryknoll: Vatican has dismissed Roy Bourgeois from order

http://ncronline.org/node/39661

By Joshua J. McElwee, November 19, 2012

Roy Bourgeois, a longtime peace activist and priest who had come under scrutiny for his support of women’s ordination, has been dismissed from the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, which he served for 45 years, according to the congregation.

The Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith made the dismissal in October, according to a news release issued Monday afternoon by the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers.

Dominican Fr. Tom Doyle, a canon lawyer acting on Bourgeois’ behalf, told NCR he was not aware of the move.

Doyle said he and Bourgeois met with Maryknoll’s superior general, Fr. Edward Dougherty, in June, and the issue of dismissal had not been discussed.

“The idea then was that things would continue and they would not dismiss Roy and they would continue to dialogue,” Doyle said. “And then this just happened, unilaterally. [Bourgeois] had no idea.”

Bourgeois was not available for comment Monday afternoon.

Mike Virgintino, the manager of communications for the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, declined to answer any questions about the matter. “I cannot answer any additional questions,” Virgintino said. “We have to stay with that statement. I can’t answer anything more.”

The statement reads: “The Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, on October 4, 2012, canonically dismissed Roy Bourgeois from the Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America, also known as the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers.

“The decision dispenses the Maryknoll priest from his sacred bonds.”

Monday’s statement from Maryknoll seemingly puts a cap on years of discussion about Bourgeois’ role in the order following his participation in the ordination of Roman Catholic Womanpriest Janice Sevre-Duszynska in August 2008.

Shortly after, Bourgeois was notified by the Vatican congregation that he had incurred a latae sententiae, or automatic, excommunication for his participation.

Over a period of years, the congregation had not responded to requests for clarification on the matter.

Monday’s statement from Maryknoll states that Bourgeois’ “disobedience and preaching against the teaching of the Catholic Church about women’s ordination led to his excommunication, dismissal and laicization.”

“With this parting, the Maryknoll Society warmly thanks Roy Bourgeois for his service to mission and all members wish him well in his personal life,” the statement concludes. “In the spirit of equity and charity, Maryknoll will assist Mr. Bourgeois with this transition.”

Maryknoll asked Bourgeois to publicly recant his support of women’s ordination, telling the priest in a March 2011 letter he faced laicization and removal from the order if he did not comply.

In a series of letters and interviews since then, Bourgeois has said he could not comply with the request.

“In essence, you are telling me to lie and I say I do not believe God calls both men and women to the priesthood,” Bourgeois wrote in a formal reply to Maryknoll’s request. “This I cannot do, therefore I will not recant.”

Maryknoll’s leadership took a vote on removing Bourgeois from the order in the spring*. While the order would confirm at the time that a vote had taken place, it would not comment on its outcome. *http://ncronline.org/node/29249 March 7, 2012

Doyle told NCR at the time that Maryknoll Fr. Mike Duggan, the U.S. regional superior of the order, informed Bourgeois of the vote, which was a split decision.

Doyle said Duggan told him two council members voted in favor of dismissal and three members abstained.

After the spring vote, Doyle and Bourgeois met with Dougherty on June 6.

In interviews following that meeting*, Bourgeois said the discussion made no mention of his removal, but instead focused on the rights of conscience of Catholics and “the importance of people of faith and members of Maryknoll to be able to speak openly and freely without fear … of being dismissed or excommunicated.” *http://ncronline.org/node/30865 June 15, 2012

Bourgeois is known for his work with SOA Watch, a group he founded in 1990 to protest the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation, a U.S. Army training school at Fort Benning, Ga., formerly known as the School of the Americas.

Bourgeois served for 45 years in Maryknoll, with 39 years as a priest.

[Joshua J. McElwee is an NCR staff writer. His email address is jmcelwee@ncronline.org.]

The full statement from the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers follows:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Canonically Dismisses Roy Bourgeois

Maryknoll, New York – November 19, 2012 – The Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, on October 4, 2012, canonically dismissed Roy Bourgeois from the Catholic Foreign Mission Society of America, also known as the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers. The decision dispenses the Maryknoll priest from his sacred bonds. 4.

As a priest during 2008, Mr. Bourgeois participated in the invalid ordination of a woman and a simulated Mass in Lexington, Kentucky. With patience, the Holy See and the Maryknoll Society have encouraged his reconciliation with the Catholic Church.

Instead, Mr. Bourgeois chose to campaign against the teachings of the Catholic Church in secular and non-Catholic venues. This was done without the permission of the local U.S. Catholic Bishops and while ignoring the sensitivities of the faithful across the country. Disobedience and preaching against the teaching of the Catholic Church about women’s ordination led to his excommunication, dismissal and laicization.

Mr. Bourgeois freely chose his views and actions, and all the members of the Maryknoll Society are saddened at the failure of reconciliation. With this parting, the Maryknoll Society warmly thanks Roy Bourgeois for his service to mission and all members wish him well in his personal life. In the spirit of equity and charity, Maryknoll will assist Mr. Bourgeois with this transition.

4B. Maryknoll priest expelled over
woman’s ordination

http://www.ucanews.com/news/maryknoll-priest-expelled-over-womans-ordination/66607

By Dennis Sadowski, Catholic News Service, November 23, 2012

NCR roots for excommunicated priest, Roy Bourgeois

5. Editorial: Ordination of women would correct an injustice

http://ncronline.org/news/people/editorial-ordination-women-would-correct-injustice

NCR Editorial Staff
December 3, 2012

The call to the priesthood is a gift from God. It is rooted in baptism and is called forth and affirmed by the community because it is authentic and evident in the person as a charism. Catholic women who have discerned a call to the priesthood and have had that call affirmed by the community should be ordained in the Roman Catholic church. Barring women from ordination to the priesthood is an injustice that cannot be allowed to stand.
The most egregious statement in the Nov. 19 press release announcing Roy Bourgeois‘ “excommunication, dismissal and laicization” is the assertion that Bourgeois’ “disobedience” and “campaign against the teachings of the Catholic church” was “ignoring the sensitivities of the faithful.” Nothing could be further from the truth. Bourgeois, attuned by a lifetime of listening to the marginalized, has heard the voice of the faithful and he has responded to that voice.
Bourgeois brings this issue to the real heart of the matter. He has said that no one can say who God can and cannot call to the priesthood, and to say that anatomy is somehow a barrier to God’s ability to call one of God’s own children forward places absurd limits on God’s power. The majority of the faithful believe this.
Let’s review the history of Rome’s response to the call of the faithful to ordain women:
In April 1976 the Pontifical Biblical Commission concluded unanimously: “It does not seem that the New Testament by itself alone will permit us to settle in a clear way and once and for all the problem of the possible accession of women to the presbyterate.” In further deliberation, the commission voted 12-5 in favor of the view that Scripture alone does not exclude the ordination of women, and 12-5 in favor of the view that the church could ordain women to the priesthood without going against Christ’s original intentions.
In Inter Insigniores (dated Oct. 15, 1976, but released the following January), the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith said: “The Church, in fidelity to the example of the Lord, does not consider herself authorized to admit women to priestly ordination.” That declaration, published with the approval of Pope Paul VI, was a relatively modest “does not consider herself authorized.”
Pope John Paul II upped the ante considerably in Ordinatio Sacerdotalis (May 22, 1994): “We declare that the Church has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women and that this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church’s faithful.” John Paul had wanted to describe the ban as “irreformable,” a much stronger stance than “definitively held.” This met substantial resistance from high-ranking bishops who gathered at a special Vatican meeting in March 1995 to discuss the document, NCR reported at the time. Even then, bishops attuned to the pastoral needs of the church had won a concession to the possibility of changing the teaching.
But that tiny victory was fleeting.
In October 1995, the doctrinal congregation acted further, releasing a responsum ad propositum dubium concerning the nature of the teaching in Ordinatio Sacerdotalis: “This teaching requires definitive assent, since, founded on the written Word of God, and from the beginning constantly preserved and applied in the Tradition of the Church, it has been set forth infallibly by the ordinary and universal Magisterium.” The ban on women’s ordination belongs “to the deposit of the faith,” the responsum said.
The aim of the responsum was to stop all discussion.
In a cover letter to the responsum, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, then head of the congregation, asked presidents of bishops’ conferences to “do everything possible to ensure its distribution and favorable reception, taking particular care that, above all on the part of theologians, pastors of souls and religious, ambiguous and contrary positions will not again be proposed.”
Despite the certainty with which Ordinatio Sacerdotalis and the responsum were issued they did not answer all the questions on the issue.

5.


Many have pointed out that to say that the teaching is “founded on the written Word of God” completely ignored the 1976 findings of the Pontifical Biblical Commission.
Others have noted that the doctrinal congregation did not make a claim of papal infallibility – it said what the pope taught in Ordinatio Sacerdotalis was that which “has been set forth infallibly by the ordinary and universal magisterium.” This too, however, has been called into question because at the time there were many bishops around the world who had serious reservations about the teaching, though few voiced them in public.
Writing in The Tablet in December 1995, Jesuit Fr. Francis A. Sullivan, a theological authority on the magisterium, cited Canon 749, that no doctrine is understood to have been defined infallibly unless this fact is clearly established. “The question that remains in my mind is whether it is a clearly established fact that the bishops of the Catholic Church are as convinced by [the teaching] as Pope John Paul evidently is,” Sullivan wrote.
The responsum caught nearly all bishops off-guard. Though dated October, it was not made public until Nov. 18. Archbishop William Keeler of Baltimore, then the outgoing president of the U.S. bishops’ conference, received the document with no warning three hours after the bishops had adjourned their annual fall meeting. One bishop told NCR that he learned about the document from reading The New York Times. He said many bishops were deeply troubled by the statement. He, like other bishops, spoke anonymously.
The Vatican had already begun to stack the deck against questioning. As Jesuit Fr. Thomas Reese reported in his 1989 book, Archbishop: Inside the Power Structure of the American Catholic Church, under John Paul a potential episcopal candidate’s view on the teaching against women’s ordination had become a litmus test for whether a priest could be promoted to bishop.
Less than a year after Ordinatio Sacerdotalis was issued, Mercy Sr. Carmel McEnroy was removed from her tenured position teaching theology at St. Meinrad Seminary in Indiana for her public dissent from church teaching; she had signed an open letter to the pope calling for women’s ordination. McEnroy very likely was the first victim of Ordinatio Sacerdotalis, but there have been many more, most recently Roy Bourgeois.
Blessed John Henry Newman said that there are three magisteria in the church: the bishops, the theologians and the people. On the issue of women’s ordination, two of the three voices have been silenced, which is why the third voice must now make itself heard. We must speak up in every forum available to us: in parish council meetings, faith-sharing groups, diocesan convocations and academic seminars. We should write letters to our bishops, to the editors of our local papers and television news channels.
Our message is that we believe the sensus fidelium is that the exclusion of women from the priesthood has no strong basis in Scripture or any other compelling rationale; therefore, women should be ordained. We have heard the faithful assent to this in countless conversations in parish halls, lecture halls and family gatherings. It has been studied and prayed over individually and in groups. The brave witness of the Women’s Ordination Conference, as one example, gives us assurance that the faithful have come to this conclusion after prayerful consideration and study – yes, even study of Ordinatio Sacerdotalis.
NCR joins its voice with Roy Bourgeois and calls for the Catholic Church to correct this unjust teaching.

6A. Early women leaders: from heads of house churches to presbyters

http://ncronline.org/node/42036

NCR Staff
January 8, 2013

Editor’s note: After our editorial Correct an injustice: Ordain women” appeared in the Dec. 7-20 issue, several readers asked us to provide more background on the history of women leaders in the early church. This is the first in an occasional series of articles looking at the history of leadership roles in the development of the church. This article covers the origins of the church up to the fifth century.
The earliest references to local resident leaders in the Pauline churches are Philippians 1:1 and Romans 16:1-2. Paul addresses his letter to the community at Philippi with their episkopoi and diakonoi (both masculine plural titles in Greek, both terms borrowed from secular leadership). These are the terms that later came to mean “bishop” and “deacon.” The episkopoi cannot mean here “bishop” as we understand it because there are many in one community. The role of the diakonoi also had not yet evolved into that which was later understood as deacon. The revised edition of the New American Bible translates the words as “overseers” and “ministers” and acknowledges in a note that the later development had not yet taken place.
Masculine plural forms are used in Greek to refer either to groups of men or to groups of mixed gender. In Romans 16:1-2, Paul introduces to the letter’s recipients a woman named Phoebe, a benefactor who is also a diakonos of the church at Cenchreae, one of the seaports of Corinth. Thus we know that women could hold this title at the time, and therefore the diakonoi in Philippi could be a mixed group. If the episkopoi of Philippians were heads of house churches, as seems likely, it is not impossible that some of them were also women (for example, Nympha in Colossians 4:15).
The account in Acts of the Apostles 6:1-6 of the apostles choosing seven men to take care of table service is usually considered the origin of the office of deacon, yet no one in the story is called diakonos and the apostles appoint them for the Diaconia of the table so that the apostles can devote themselves to the diakonos of prayer and the word. All perform diakonos of different kinds.

6.


Some years later, the churches of the Pastoral Epistles seem to have had a single episkopos, now a bishop (1 Timothy 3:1; Titus 1:7), with deacons as assistants. Women are explicitly included among the deacons (1 Timothy 3:11), possibly as wives of deacons but most likely as deacons themselves. Presbyters are a shadowy group here, mentioned later (1 Timothy 5:17-19). This reference could be to leaders in general, since the word originally meant “elders.” Slightly later texts, like the letters of Ignatius of Antioch in the early second century, show the developing structure of bishop with his deacons and presbyters. The role of the deacons is clearer, as assistant to the bishop. The presbyters seem to be a council to the bishop. Nothing is said that precludes the presence of women in either group.
By the third century, there are both male and female deacons, particularly in the Eastern church. There is abundant literary and inscriptional evidence of female deacons. Their title is “deacon” or “deaconess,” seemingly interchangeably. The early third-century Syrian Didascalia Apostolorum compares the bishop to God, the male deacon to Christ, and the female deacon to the Holy Spirit. The presbyters are likened only to the apostles; their role is still not clear (9.3-8). Though this document prohibits women from teaching, female deacons have a ministry to women that only they can perform: instruction, assistance at baptism, and other kinds of pastoral ministry. The late fourth-century Apostolic Constitutions gives the rite for ordination of a female deacon, with hands laid on and invocation of the Holy Spirit (8.19-20).
A further document, the Testamentum Domini, probably written in the late fourth or early fifth century, assumes the existence of deaconesses, but preeminence is given to widows, who are clearly among the clergy along with bishop, presbyters and deacons (1.19, 23). There is a rite for their ordination (1.41). Deaconesses are not seated among the clergy, but at the head of the rest of the women of the congregation. Later in the document, female presbyters appear, to remain after liturgy with the bishop and the widows, fasting and praying until dawn (2.19). Here, the root meaning of “older women” could apply, though their placing with widows for all-night vigil with the bishop would then seem strange.
Only in the mid third century does the role of presbyters begin to emerge, when Christian congregations in a given region are growing too large to assemble all together with the bishop. As church organization evolves in the fourth century, presbyters are now in charge of satellite communities in large urban areas, and increasingly in rural areas as well. From these years come several conciliar and episcopal condemnations of women presbyters (for example, Council of Nîmes, In ministerium leviticum, canon 2; the Council of Laodicea, presbytides, canon 11; Letter 14 of Pope Gelasius, ministrare sacris altaribus; Fulgentius of Carthage, presbyterae). It is highly unlikely that so many condemnations would appear about a nonexistent practice. The frequency of occurrences suggests a widespread practice. Moreover, there is positive evidence of women presbyters. Several earlier inscriptions from Phrygia, Thera, Egypt and Sicily commemorate female presbyters, in one case (Ammion in Phrygia), the commemoration made by a bishop. The holy presbyter Flavia Vitalia in early fifth-century Dalmatia (today, Croatia) sold a piece of church burial property, so she was an authorized church agent. Leta presbytera in late fifth-century Calabria is commemorated by her husband, who does not bear an ecclesiastical title; it is therefore highly unlikely that her title comes from being his wife. Martia presbyteria made the offering along with two men in a graffito from Gaul around the same time. Giulia Runa presbiterissa is commemorated in the church of St. Augustine at Hippo, from a time soon after his death, probably during the Vandal occupation. Most intriguing are two fragments of a tombstone from Solin in Dalmatia, one a cross, the other the word fragment — dotae, of which the most obvious reconstruction would be sacerdotae, to the (female) priest.
It is interesting to note that most of the references to female presbyters come rather late and that most come not from the East, where female deacons were more widely known, but from the West.
[This article was prepared with consultation with scholars knowledgeable about the topic but who asked that their names not be used.]
For further reading
Ute E. Eisen, Women Officeholders in Early Christianity: Epigraphical and Literary Studies (Liturgical Press, 2000)
Roger Gryson, The Ministry of Women in the Early Church (Liturgical Press, 1976)
Kevin Madigan and Carolyn Osiek, editors, Ordained Women in the Early Church: A Documentary History (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005)
Aimé Georges Martimort, Deaconesses: An Historical Study (Ignatius Press, 1986)
Mary Ann Rossi, “Priesthood, Precedent, and Prejudice: On Recovering the Women Priests of Early Christianity,” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion 7, No. 1 (1991): a translation with introduction of Giorgio Otranto, “Note sul sacerdozio femminilie nell’ antichità in margine a una testimonianza di Gelasio I,” Vetera Christianorum 19 (1982)

SELECTED COMMENT

Women have ALWAYS been excluded from receiving the Sacrament of Holy Orders. In 2000-year history the Catholic Church has NEVER ordained any woman. No woman priest! No woman bishop! No woman deacon!

Public Revelation, i.e. Apostolic Tradition, Holy Scripture and the infallible Magisterium of the Catholic Church, excludes women from the priesthood. There has NEVER been any valid woman bishop, or woman priest or woman deacon.

The Catholic Church teaches that women are excluded from being bishops, priests and deacons.

In 2000-year history the Catholic Church has NEVER ordained any woman deacon. Christ excluded women from receiving the Sacrament of Holy Orders. You have Public Revelation for that. It’s useless for any writer to try to prove otherwise. Look at this article. What is it? Just blah, blah, blah. It’s just a bark in the dark.

Let’s be serious and take the infallible teachings of the Catholic Church for that. Public Revelation admits only MEN for Holy Orders.

7.

St Augustine bows humbly to the Pope: Roma Locuta Est, Causa Finita Est; “Rome has spoken, the case is closed.”

The phrase comes from Sermon 131.10 of St. Augustine, the Latin is: “… jam enim dehac causa duo concilia missa sunt ad sedem apostolicam; inde etiam rescriptavenerunt; causa finita est”.

In English: “… for already on this matter two councils have sent to the Apostolic See, whence also rescripts have come. The cause is finished.”

What DID St. Augustine say? Two councils (from the African bishops) had been sent to Rome (the Apostolic See) and Rome had replied by sending rescripts (= had spoken) and upon that the cause is finished. Joe Zammit

6B. Did women have priestly roles in the early Church?

http://www.ucanews.com/news/did-women-have-priestly-roles-in-the-early-church/67131

NCR Staff International, January 17, 2013

While there is no conclusive proof, there is evidence to suggest that women may indeed have acted as leaders in ancient Christianity.

The earliest references to local resident leaders in the Pauline churches are Philippians 1:1 and Romans 16:1-2. [Ditto as the NCR article] It is interesting to note that most of the references to female presbyters come rather late and that most come not from the East, where female deacons were more widely known, but from the West.

SELECTED COMMENT

So, basically, some women were deacons and some women were advisers, but there is absolutely no evidence whatsoever that any woman was ever a priest or bishop. Matthew Olson

7A. Catholic newspaper calls for ordination of women

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5hymuFt8_0vG-cAT30D-CRoalpDpg?docId=CNG.b93152338931f5ba637dce59fa389a5e.2a1

By Robert MacPherson (AFP) – December 3, 2012

WASHINGTON — An independent Roman Catholic newspaper in the United States called Monday for a campaign to reverse the Vatican’s refusal to allow women to become priests.

“Barring women from ordination to the priesthood is an injustice that cannot be allowed to stand,” the National Catholic Reporter said, waving a red flag in front of the Vatican over one of its most strongly held teachings.

The call to the priesthood “is a gift from God,” it said, and excluding women from responding to that call “has no strong basis in Scripture or any other compelling rationale.”

With bishops and theologians on record as opposing women’s ordination, the Missouri-based biweekly — a respected voice of the Church’s reformist wing — said it now fell upon the faith’s rank and file to press for change.

“We must speak up in every forum available to us: in parish council meetings, faith-sharing groups, diocesan convocations and academic seminars,” it said. “We should write letters to our bishops, to the editors of our local papers and television news channels.”

There was no immediate reaction from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, which toes a conservative line on other hot-button issues such as abortion, contraception and gay marriage.

The United States has the largest Catholic population of any rich country, with a quarter of its 310 million people belonging to the faith — a proportion sustained by Latino immigration.

The editorial was prompted by last month’s excommunication and expulsion of Father Roy Bourgeois from the Maryknoll order for his role in a women’s ordination ceremony in Kentucky in 2008.

In a statement on November 19, the order said Bourgeois, a priest for 39 years, had acted “without the permission” of local bishops “while ignoring the sensitivities of the faithful across the country.”

“Disobedience and preaching against the teaching of the Catholic Church about women’s ordination led to his excommunication, dismissal and laicization,” it said.

The Vatican’s Code of Canon Law states that “a baptized male alone receives sacred ordination validly.” Church leaders insist that is an infallible rule that can never be changed.

Erin Saiz Hanna, executive director of the Women’s Ordination Conference, said the National Catholic Reporter editorial comes at an important time for Catholics “fed up with the Vatican’s hypocrisy and bullying.”

Her organization, based in Washington, was founded in 1975 to campaign for women to become priests and bishops.

“While Father Roy suffers the severest sanctions possible in our Catholic tradition, bishops who fail to protect children from pedophile priests often quietly walk away without punishment or censure,” she said in an email to AFP.

The editorial, she said, “resonates with a much larger church — the church of the people of God who grasp that men and women are both created equal and that both men and women experience the same calls to priesthood.”

7B. Catholic paper says forbidding women priests ‘an injustice’

Sees no scriptural basis for Vatican ban on female ordination

http://www.ucanews.com/news/catholic-paper-says-forbidding-women-priests-an-injustice/66718

Robert MacPherson, Washington, United States, December 4, 2012

An independent Roman Catholic newspaper in the United States called Monday for a campaign to reverse the Vatican’s refusal to allow women to become priests. [Ditto as the AFP article] The editorial was prompted by last month’s excommunication and expulsion of Father Roy Bourgeois from the Maryknoll order for his role in a women’s ordination ceremony in Kentucky in 2008.

SELECTED COMMENTS

The best biblical evidence is that Jesus did not ordain any women. Can’t really get past that. This article is so slanted it’s ridiculous. “A respected voice of the Church’s reformist wing”? Respected by who? They disrespect the Pope and that’s all we need to know. And “The United States has the largest Catholic population of any rich country, with a quarter of its 310 million people belonging to the faith.” And? Because the USA is rich we should pay attention? Who wrote this article? Oh, look he’s an American! Tee Brown

Since when the NCR replaced the Church’ teaching ministry and on what grounds? The truth remains the truth no matter how many contradict it. Edward

These so called Catholics should just leave the Church and be Protestants or anything else. Andrew Kong

I think the author was referring to the original article by The Catholic Reporter newspaper.
In the US, the popular blogging priest, Fr. Z, has a name for this news outlet, “The Fishwrap”. They are probably the only “c”atholic news that seems to favor liberalism and a tendency attack basic teachings of the Church. NCR earns the Fishwrap title alright…
Thien Ta

The USCCB “toes a conservative line on other hot-button issues…” Oh, you mean what the Church has always taught? By all means, let’s change something we don’t like about the Church and we can branch off and form a new church. Wait a minute that’s been tried – they call it Protestantism! WR Baker

8. Women’s ordination – the elephant in the room

Church must face up to the issue now

http://www.ucanews.com/news/womens-ordination-the-elephant-in-the-room/67221

By Sophia Lizares Bodegon, Manila, International January 25, 2013

To be expelled from friendship circles and driven away from the sources of life is a death sentence.

Few people know this better than India’s Dalits, or Untouchables, who are considered the most polluted and polluting of peoples. Almost 80 percent of Indian Christians have Dalit backgrounds. Many of them are martyrs for the faith, suffering expulsion from their villages. They may not buy food from the village shop, nor can they draw water from the village well.

But there is another looming issue of disunity.

The Catholic Church continues to disqualify half its membership from leadership because they are women and to expel members who challenge that policy.

In a time of prayer for Christian unity, it is an elephant in the room.

Threats of excommunication hang above the heads of clergy, particularly those who support the ordination of women as priests. During this week, Tony Flannery, a Redemptorist Irish priest who has been threatened with excommunication by the Vatican, broke his silence. In a widely-published statement, Flannery declared the centrality of being Catholic to his personal identity.

“No matter what sanctions the Vatican imposes on me I will continue, in whatever way I can, to try to bring about reform in the Church and to make it again a place where all who want to follow Christ will be welcome,” he said. Pointing out how Christ made friends with the outcasts of society, he vowed to continue to oppose “the current Vatican trend of creating a Church of condemnation rather than one of compassion.”

For Flannery, giving up the “freedom of thought, freedom of speech and most especially freedom of conscience is too high a price for me to pay to be allowed to minister in today’s Church.”

In November, the Vatican dismissed Roy Bourgeois, an American priest from the Maryknoll order, for supporting women’s ordinations.

Female theologians such as Elizabeth Johnson have similarly been sanctioned. A day before the Week of Prayer started on January 18, Sri Lankan theologian Tissa Balasuriya passed away. He too supported women’s ordination and is the only Asian to have been excommunicated.

Despite the threats, resolute conversations continue. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) in October, an international group of theologians presented “A Catholic Scholars Declaration,” with a blueprint for “a new system of authority, based on Gospel teaching and genuine co-responsibility as demanded by Vatican II.”

The declaration stressed “standards of openness, accountability and democracy achieved in modern society. Leadership should be seen to be honest and credible; inspired by humility and service; breathing concern for people rather than preoccupation with rules and discipline; radiating a Christ who makes us free; and listening to Christ’s Spirit who speaks and acts through each and every person.”

The theme of this year’s Week of Prayer came from Micah 6:6-8: What does God require of us?” This question refers not just to relationships outside the churches, but also to those within – and those who struggle to remain within.

Sophia Lizares Bodegon is a member of the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians (EATWOT) and works in lay and continuing education.

Sophia Lizares Bodegon, writing for UCAN,
is also a member of Ecclesia of Women in Asia [EWA]:

http://ecclesiaofwomen.ning.com/forum/topics/synthesis-of-ewa-iv-by-astrid?commentId=2228197%3AComment%3A5745
http://ecclesiaofwomen.ning.com/forum/topics/a-letter-from-judette?commentId=2228197%3AComment%3A5343
9.

9. Redemptorist priest: Vatican threatened excommunication for advocating discussion

http://ncronline.org/news/global/redemptorist-priest-vatican-threatened-excommunication-my-teachings

John Cooney, Dublin, January 23, 2013

Update: The head of the Redemptorist fathers in Rome said he deeply regrets that Flannery broke the silence he had been asked to observe, Catholic New Service reported Wednesday

Redemptorist Fr. Michael Brehl, the order’s superior general, also confirmed that Flannery is under Vatican investigation for alleged ambiguities “regarding fundamental areas of Catholic doctrine, including the priesthood, the nature of the church and the Eucharist.”

Brehl said he wanted to “earnestly invite” Flannery “to renew the efforts to find an agreed solution to the concerns raised by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.”

He also asked Irish Redemptorists to “join with me in praying and working together in the spirit of St. Alphonsus to maintain and strengthen our communion with the universal church.”

PREVIOUS STORY

Irish Redemptorist Fr. Tony Flannery broke a year of silence Sunday to reveal that the Vatican had threatened him with excommunication and removal from his religious congregation because he advocates for open discussions about church teachings on ordaining women, clerical celibacy, contraceptives and homosexuality.

The Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith removed Flannery, 66, from public ministry last February, pending the outcome of its inquiries into views he expressed in Reality, a Redemptorist-run magazine.

Flannery also said he has had no direct contact in person or writing from the congregation. All communication has come through the Redemptorist superior general in Rome, Fr. Michael Brehl.

Flannery described the actions against him as “frightening, disproportionate and reminiscent of the Inquisition.”

He said he initially tried to find a compromise with the Vatican congregation, but by September, it became clear this would not happen. “I gradually became aware that the CDF continually raised the bar until it got to the point where I could no longer negotiate,” Flannery said. “I was faced with a choice. Either I sign a statement, for publication, stating that I accepted teachings that I could not accept, or I would remain permanently banned from priestly ministry, and maybe face more serious sanctions. It is important to state clearly that these issues were not matters of fundamental teaching, but rather of church governance,” he said.

Flannery, a popular retreat master and writer, said the congregation also had ordered him “not to have any involvement, public or private” with the Association of Catholic Priests. Flannery co-founded the association in 2010 as a forum for discussion among Irish clergy on issues affecting the Irish church and society.

“I have served the church, the Redemptorists and the people of God for two-thirds of my life. Throughout that time, I have in good conscience raised issues I believed important for the future of the Church in books and essays largely read by practicing Catholics, rather than raising them in mainstream media,” Flannery said in a statement released at a news conference. “I’m hardly a major and subversive figure within the Church deserving excommunication and expulsion from the religious community within which I have lived since my teens.” The choice facing him, he said, was between deciding between Rome and his conscience. “Submitting to these threats would be a betrayal of my ministry, my fellow priests and the Catholic people who want change,” he said.

The Redemptorists in Ireland issued a strong defense of Flannery on Sunday.

“We do understand and support his efforts to listen carefully to and at times to articulate the views of people he encounters in the course of his ministry,” the provincial leadership team of the Irish Redemptorists said in a statement.

They said they regretted immensely that “some structures or processes of dialogue have not yet been found in the Church which have a greater capacity to engage with challenging voices from among God’s people, while respecting the key responsibility and central role of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.”

The Association of Catholic Priests also affirmed “in the strongest possible terms” its support for Flannery. The association said Flannery was being targeted as “part of a worldwide effort to negate the influence of independent priests’ associations in Austria, USA, Germany, France, Switzerland and other places.”

Also at the news conference was Fr. Helmut Schüller of the Austrian Priests’ Initiative. He criticized the “lack of basic rights and respect for personal conscience” in the church.

Former Irish President Mary McAleese spoke in support of Flannery and other dissident Irish clerics Oct. 20 at the launch of her book Quo Vadis?: Collegiality in the Code of Canon Law at the Jesuit headquarters in Dublin. There she spoke privately to Flannery, who was making a rare public appearance.

The reform group We are Church Ireland announced a peaceful vigil outside the Vatican’s Apostolic Nunciature in Dublin, planned for Jan. 27, to offer unconditional support for Flannery’s right “not to be forced by an abuse of his vow of obedience to submit to the secretive demands” of the doctrinal congregation.

Flannery said, “The threats are a means, not just of terrifying me into submission, but of sending a message to any other priest expressing views at variance with those of the Roman Curia.”

From the West of Ireland, Flannery was born in Attymon, County Galway, and spent time as a Redemptorist preacher in Limerick. He has a large following both as preacher and retreat master. He is a popularizer, rather than a heavyweight scholar. He holds audience attention through dialogue, especially with parents who find that the clerical abuse scandals have alienated their children from religion. 10.

Once noted for hellfire sermons, the Redemptorists have been at the forefront of the drive for necessary church change. Flannery’s 1999 book, From the Inside: A Priest’s View of the Catholic Church, is part autobiographical and part appraisal of Irish Catholicism. It consists of short, readable pieces, highlighting inadequate sexual and spiritual training of priests. It examines fault lines that emerged in the aftermath of Pope Paul VI’s 1968 encyclical, Humanae Vitae, upholding the church’s ban on artificial forms of contraception.

In this book, too, Flannery criticized the institution’s mishandling of clerical celibacy.

His Fragments of Reality, published in 2008 by Columba Press of Dublin, contains his collected writings since 1998, when he was a member of the Redemptorist Mission Team which comprised laypeople and clergy.

He saw firsthand the steady decline throughout Ireland of church attendance and of candidates for the priesthood.

He also witnessed the continued denial of any meaningful role for women in ministry. “How much longer can this policy be sustained?” he wrote. “We must be the last institution in the Western world that continues to hold such blatant discrimination against women. I don’t have any doubt that there is no theological or scriptural basis for this position, but that it is purely a social and institutional construct hiding a fairly barefaced and primitive desire for male domination.”

In the essay “The Ordination of Women” in Fragments of Reality, he revealed that he knows a few of the women who were ordained in the Roman Catholic women priests’ movement on a riverboat in Pittsburgh in 2006. He personally knows Irish-born Bridget Mary Meehan, who is a bishop in the Association of Roman Catholic Women Priests.

[John Cooney is a Dublin-based journalist and historian.]

SELECTED COMMENTS

I am a retired, married priest, properly “dispensed” for whatever that means, and a teacher in Catholic schools for 25 years in Canada. Currently in retirement I continue as a marriage minister through an association of ordained ministers and thus can serve those who find the doors of the formal church shut to their needs. Like Fr. Flannery, perhaps being a slow learner, I just grew up and began to realize that the restrictions imposed by the Vatican and the CDF had nothing to do with the gospel or the faith, but were the mechanisms used by any cult that finds blind obedience the only way to hold onto its members. Ireland is long overdue in responding to the call of the universal church through Vatican II to wake up, grow up and become “church”, rather than just attending and listening to an elite self-appointed clique who for centuries have appropriated the “good” of the church for themselves. In doing so they have twisted theology and misinterpreted the scriptures. The CDF attack on Flannery must be understood as the desperate attempt of an old cult establishment to hold on to power and the exclusivity that has characterized their leadership. Flannery does not propose anything spectacularly new or extraordinary more than 50 years after Vatican II began to open the windows to let in fresh air and “light”. But there is no doubt that the CDF and its former chief inquisitor view Flannery and clerics like him are a threat. As they suppress one voice of reform, two or more sprout up like artesian wells of bubbling sweet water. So while the heat is on Flannery, the desperation of the CDF must be understood as the final gasps of a dying and irrelevant institution of governance that no longer speaks the truth. The matter is not the obedience of Flannery to his priestly ministry, but rather the obedience of the Vatican cadre to the Catholic faith and the call to leadership. On this we find they have little credibility or authority. Phil Little

Coming from one who rejected Christ and abandoned their vocation…suddenly they are able to be absolutely correct in their assessment of the Churches supposed problems? Is not their lack of faith perhaps THE problem?? I think what St Catherine said is a little bit more accurate… “When the Church speaks,” wrote St. Catherine of Siena, “it is Jesus himself whom we hear.” As much as rebellious priests seek justification in their desertion of all morality, perhaps, again, faithfulness to Christ and His Church is exactly what is needed in this period where instead we experience wholesale abandonment of the faith, all in the name of a misunderstanding of Vat II no less. M P Lane

Phil Little, This is not a matter of blind obedience. Professing to GOD during your ordination requires a priest to subordinate himself to GOD and his earthly Bishops to maintain civility within the Catholic Church. Each of us has responsibilities in his/her life whether it be marriage or any other call from GOD. So easy to blame the Vatican but you knew when you spoke your vows to GOD that you also subjected yourself to your Bishop and now you are trying to gain sympathy for your position which goes against obedience. Explain to me as a former priest how you interpret Luke 6. When Jesus spent an entire night in discourse with HIS FATHER and upon coming down from the mountain HE appointed twelve men from all the disciples (male and female), how anyone on earth including the Pope can change what GOD decided? Are you saying that GOD did not know what HE was doing? Such PRIDE! As to Celibacy: Say a priest was permitted to marry. This same priest has responsibility for one thousand or more parishioners and he and his wife have eight children as my parents did. How does this priest use his time? Does he tend to his wife and children full time or to his parishioners full time? Bear in mind he cannot do both and both require his full attention. Why is it that we humans always want the easy way out? You say that the Vatican imposed restrictions. Are they restrictions that the Vatican imposed or did you simply realize that you could no longer serve GOD and your selfish needs? All humans have the same temptations as Satan is nearby. GOD is closer to us and we can resist temptation if we ask HIM. Of course the Church instituted by Jesus Christ no longer speaks the truth, only Phil Little speaks the truth. Such ARROGANCE! Tom Warren

There’s more of both NCR and UCAN on dissidents’ aspirations for women’s ordination in the recent past, but I trust that I’ve made my point with the above. Agence France-Presse [AFP] describes the NCR as “An independent Roman Catholic newspaper” [pages 8, 9]. The NCR may be independent, but it is certainly NOT ROMAN CATHOLIC, not by a long shot. Neither is UCAN which shares the NCR‘s footprints. 11.

UPDATE – JANUARY 31, 2013

A Bishop calls NCR‘s “Catholic” bluff!

The Bishop’s Role in Fostering the Mission of the Catholic Media

http://catholickey.org/2013/01/25/the-bishops-role-in-fostering-the-mission-of-the-catholic-media/

By Bishop Robert W. Finn, January 25, 2013

When I was editor of the diocesan paper in St. Louis, my office had a statue of St. Francis De Sales, Bishop of Geneva, and Doctor of the Church. Francis died in 1622. He is regarded as a patron of journalists and of the Catholic Press. His feast day is January 24, and has been observed by the Vatican for many years as World Communications Day. Again this year, the Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI has used the occasion to give a message to us on Social Communications.

The Forty-Seventh World Communications Day Message is entitled “Social Networks: Portals of Truth and Faith; New Spaces for Evangelization.” Here the Pope speaks about the opportunities for evangelization made possible through social media. He also addresses the moral responsibility we have to use these media in respectful ways. For nearly a half-century these messages have affirmed the value of modern communication in the presentation of the Gospel.

The Church’s Canon law places on the local bishop a particular responsibility to use the media effectively in the work of the Gospel, and to call the media to fidelity in the use of means of social communications.

Canon 747: “It is the obligation and inherent right of the Church, … to preach the Gospel to all people, using for this purpose even its own means of social communication; for it is to the Church that Christ the Lord entrusted the deposit of faith, so that by the assistance of the Holy Spirit, it might conscientiously guard revealed truth, more intimately penetrate it, and faithfully proclaim and expound it.”

Canon 761: “While pride of place must always be given to preaching and catechetical instruction, all the available means of proclaiming Christian doctrine are to be used, … (including) the printed word and other means of social communication.”

Canon 831: “The Christian faithful are not, unless there is a just and reasonable cause, to write in newspapers, pamphlets or periodicals which clearly are accustomed to attack the Catholic religion or good morals.”

Canon 804: “The formation and education provided … through the means of social communication, is subject to the authority of the Church. It is for the Bishop’s Conference to issue general norms concerning this field of activity and for the Diocesan Bishop to regulate and watch over it.”

There is a Canon that deals with the abuse of the media, under the section of the Code – “Offences against Religion and the Unity of the Church.”

Canon 1369: “A person is to be punished with a just penalty, who, at a public event or assembly, or in a published writing, or by otherwise using the means of social communication, utters blasphemy, or gravely harms public morals, or rails at or excites hatred of or contempt for religion or the Church.”

I am very proud of the work of our diocesan Catholic paper, The Catholic Key, our writers, and all involved with its production for the conscientious manner in which they use the paper to teach Catholic doctrine, to provide trustworthy reflections on issues that take place in our culture, and to provide stories of apostolic life and work – particularly from our local diocese – that inspire us to live our Catholic faith more fully.

Similarly, the apostolate of Catholic Radio has blossomed locally. KEXS, 1090 AM, Catholic radio has helped Catholics to know and live their faith. Catholic radio is enjoyed by non-Catholics and has been the cause of many coming to the Faith and entering the Church.

In a different way, I am sorry to say, my attention has been drawn once again to the National Catholic Reporter, a newspaper with headquarters in this Diocese. I have received letters and other complaints about NCR from the beginning of my time here. In the last months I have been deluged with emails and other correspondence from Catholics concerned about the editorial stances of the Reporter: officially condemning Church teaching on the ordination of women, insistent undermining of Church teaching on artificial contraception and sexual morality in general, lionizing dissident theologies while rejecting established Magisterial teaching, and a litany of other issues.

My predecessor bishops have taken different approaches to the challenge. Bishop Charles Helmsing in October of 1968 issued a condemnation of the National Catholic Reporter and asked the publishers to remove the name “Catholic” from their title – to no avail. From my perspective, NCR‘s positions against authentic Church teaching and leadership have not changed trajectory in the intervening decades.

When early in my tenure I requested that the paper submit their bona fides as a Catholic media outlet in accord with the expectations of Church law, they declined to participate indicating that they considered themselves an “independent newspaper which commented on ‘things Catholic.'”  At other times, correspondence has seemed to reach a dead end.

In light of the number of recent expressions of concern, I have a responsibility as the local bishop to instruct the Faithful about the problematic nature of this media source which bears the name “Catholic.” While I remain open to substantive and respectful discussion with the legitimate representatives of NCR, I find that my ability to influence the National Catholic Reporter toward fidelity to the Church seems limited to the supernatural level. For this we pray: St. Francis De Sales, intercede for us.

There are more than 130 readers’ comments to this article written by Bishop Robert Finn of Kansas City-St. Joseph, MO, USA. I read the first 100. There are around 55 for the Bishop and 45 against the Bishop and for the NCR, almost evenly matched. I’m surprised that the Bishop did that well. Trojan-horse media like the NCR have contributed greatly to the formation of countless dissenting minds among the ordinary faithful.


Bishop: National Catholic Reporter
undermines Church teaching

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/bishop-national-catholic-reporter-undermines-church-teaching/

January 25, 2013

Kansas City, Mo. (CNA, Catholic News Agency) – Bishop Robert Finn of Kansas City-Saint Joseph announced his discouragement that the National Catholic Reporter has failed to live up to the “Catholic” portion of its name.
“In light of the number of recent expressions of concern, I have a responsibility as the local bishop to instruct the Faithful about the problematic nature of this media source which bears the name ‘Catholic,'” he wrote in his Jan. 25 column for his diocesan paper, “The Catholic Key”.
His comments on the National Catholic Reporter came in the context of World Communications Day, held on Jan. 24. He noted that the day is celebrated then as it is the feast of Saint Francis de Sales, patron of journalists and the Catholic press.
Bishop Finn reflected on the role bishops play in fostering Catholic media and their responsibility over local media for the promotion and protection of the faith.

13.


The bishop noted that he is well-pleased with The Catholic Key and its staff, who “use the paper to teach Catholic doctrine, to provide trustworthy reflections on issues that take place in our culture, and to provide stories of apostolic life and work – particularly from our local diocese – that inspire us to live our Catholic faith more fully.”
Bishop Finn said he is similarly happy with the Catholic radio station located in the diocese, KEXS 1090, for helping Catholics to “know and live their faith.”
In contrast to these positive, faithful Catholic media outlets located in the Kansas City-Saint Joseph diocese, Bishop Finn examined the National Catholic Reporter.
“I have received letters and other complaints about NCR from the beginning of my time here,” said Bishop Finn, who was consecrated the diocese’s coadjutor in May, 2004.
He continued, “In the last months I have been deluged with emails and other correspondence from Catholics concerned about the editorial stances of the Reporter: officially condemning Church teaching on the ordination of women, insistent undermining of Church teaching on artificial contraception and sexual morality in general, lionizing dissident theologies while rejecting established Magisterial teaching, and a litany of other issues.”
He noted that the problems associated with the National Catholic Reporter did not start under his time as bishop.
“Bishop Charles Helmsing in October of 1968 issued a condemnation of the National Catholic Reporter and asked the publishers to remove the name ‘Catholic’ from their title – to no avail. From my perspective, NCR’s positions against authentic Church teaching and leadership have not changed trajectory in the intervening decades.”
He noted that early on in his time as bishop he asked that the Reporter “submit their bona fides as a Catholic media outlet in accord with the expectations of Church law.”
“They declined to participate,” he wrote, “indicating that they considered themselves an ‘independent newspaper which commented on ‘things Catholic.” At other times, correspondence has seemed to reach a dead end.”
Bishop Finn wrote that “While I remain open to substantive and respectful discussion with the legitimate representatives of NCR, I find that my ability to influence the National Catholic Reporter toward fidelity to the Church seems limited to the supernatural level.”
Noting Bishop Finn’s column, Edward Peters, professor of canon law at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, posited that National Catholic Reporter’s use of “Catholic” in their title is canonically illicit. “There is simply zero question about this assertion, for they ‘claim the name Catholic without the consent of the competent ecclesiastical authority.’ Second, once one is shown to be acting illegally under canon law, a number of canonical responses to illicit activity come into play including precepts, the invocation of penal law, and certain sacramental consequences for organizational leadership,” Peters wrote Jan. 25 at “In the Light of the Law.”
Bishop Finn’s column concluded as it began, with an appeal to St. Francis de Sales.
Realizing that by natural means he has been unable to bring the Reporter to fidelity to the Church, he wrote: “For this we pray: St. Francis De Sales intercede for us.”

Out of around 30 readers’ comments to this CNA article, 25 of them express solidarity with the Bishop and the Church. That’s more like it.

Canon Lawyer: Bishop has warned National Catholic Reporter
http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/canon-lawyer-bishop-has-warned-national-catholic-reporter/

By Carl Bunderson, January 31, 2013

Kansas City, Mo. (CNA, Catholic News Agency) – A canon lawyer at the Catholic University of America says that a recent column by Bishop Robert Finn serves as a strong urging to the National Catholic Reporter to re-establish its fidelity to the Church.
“What he’s doing here,” Dr. Kurt Martens said, “is he’s giving them a warning, saying ‘Be careful, because…I’ve looked into the NCR’s positions against authentic Church teaching on a number of issues.'”
“He has, as a diocesan bishop, not only the right, but the duty or obligation to oversee what is happening in his diocese,” Martens told CNA in a Jan. 30 interview, and “to make sure that the name ‘Catholic’ is not used in vain.”
14.

Bishop Finn shepherds the Diocese of Kansas City-Saint Joseph, where the National Catholic Reporter is headquartered.
In a Jan. 25 column for his diocesan paper, “The Catholic Key,” Bishop Finn wrote that “in light of the number of recent expressions of concern, I have a responsibility as the local bishop to instruct the Faithful about the problematic nature of this media source which bears the name ‘Catholic.'”
In his column, the bishop did not take issue with the paper’s reporting, but with its editorial stances.
“In the last months I have been deluged with emails and other correspondence from Catholics concerned about the editorial stances of the Reporter: officially condemning Church teaching on the ordination of women, insistent undermining of Church teaching on artificial contraception and sexual morality in general, lionizing dissident theologies while rejecting established Magisterial teaching, and a litany of other issues.”
Martens, who works as an associate professor of canon law at the D.C. university, said that the gravity of the National Catholic Reporter’s editorial stance of supporting the ordination of women is significant – and that the issue goes so far as to address Church unity and the Sacraments.
“Bishop Finn is…exercising vigilance over the use of the title ‘Catholic’ in his diocese. And if there is a need, he intervenes by first warning, and ultimately taking away that title ‘Catholic.'”
In his column, the bishop noted that in 1968, his predecessor Bishop Charles Helmsing condemned the publication “and asking the publishers to remove the name ‘Catholic’ from their title – to no avail.”
Martens said, “it is correct that the title ‘Catholic’ can only be used with permission, explicit or implicit, of competent ecclesiastical authority” – who in the National Catholic Reporter’s case, is Bishop Finn.
“His authority as local bishop is that he has indeed that right and obligation to verify that every organization that calls itself Catholic, is indeed Catholic.” He said this is important so that the faithful are not “misled” by writings in disagreement with Church teaching.
Martens said that the bishop’s warning also serves as an invitation to a “substantive and respectful discussion” for the Reporter’s representatives.
He also speculated that Bishop Finn’s final step could be to remove the publication’s permission to use the name “Catholic,” which is “perfectly within his rights.”
If the National Catholic Reporter is not open to dialogue with Bishop Finn, Martens said that the bishop “might have no other option but to take away their right…to use the title ‘Catholic.'”
In doing so, Bishop Finn would be exercising his responsibility of governing his diocese.
Martens observed that the bishop “has not only the right to do so, but he has the obligation. If there is indeed a problem with the editorials, as is the case here, and you see that someone uses the term ‘Catholic,’ yet is constantly undermining the Magisterium of the Church, then a bishop cannot just sit back and relax and enjoy a drink.”
“He has to intervene. It’s not only a right to intervene, but an obligation also. The combination of the two is important. What Bishop Finn does here, is what he has to do as a bishop.”

Out of 12 readers’ comments on this CNA article, 8 of them express solidarity with the Bishop and the Church.

Recognizing the National Catholic Reporter for what it is (actually, for what it isn’t)

http://canonlawblog.wordpress.com/2013/01/25/recognizing-the-national-catholic-reporter-for-what-it-is-actually-for-what-it-isnt/

January 25, 2013

Bishop Robert Finn (Kansas City, MO) has a very good column on a local bishop’s responsibility over local media in regard to the promotion and protection of the Catholic Faith. Most folks, however, will likely skim the first part of the essay, and go right for Finn’s critique of the National Catholic Reporter in the second.

In my opinion, Finn was too kind to them.

The National Catholic Reporter has carried on a steady tirade against ecclesiastical authority in general, and against numerous Church teachings in particular, for several decades, but the last few years have seen a shrillness that should discomfort even its dwindling number of friends. 15.

Besides my own efforts to reply to them (e.g., July 2010, October 2009, March 2009) Fr. Z’s blog has long served as a clearing house for reasonable, Catholic responses to the National Catholic Reporter (what a thankless task that is).

I won’t try to summarize his efforts here, but I will recall my own experiences of the unprofessionalism of the National Catholic Reporter (March 2011, January 2011) and wonder again whether its one-time editor Joe Feuerherd ever retracted his 2008 “bishops be damned” screed in the Washington Post. If he did, I missed it.

Finn’s remarks regarding the National Catholic Reporter focus on their use of the name “Catholic” in their title and it is here that he goes too gently, I think, against their continued use of that title. Finn writes: In light of the number of recent expressions of concern, I have a responsibility as the local bishop to instruct the Faithful about the problematic nature of this media source which bears the name “Catholic.” While I remain open to substantive and respectful discussion with the legitimate representatives of NCR, I find that my ability to influence the National Catholic Reporter toward fidelity to the Church seems limited to the supernatural level.

First, I would have expressly argued that the National Catholic Reporter’s use of the word “Catholic” in their title is canonically illicit per Canons 216 and 300. There is simply zero question about this assertion, for they “claim the name Catholic without the consent of the competent ecclesiastical authority.” Second, once one is shown to be acting illegally under canon law, a number of canonical responses to illicit activity come into play including precepts, the invocation of penal law, and certain sacramental consequences for organizational leadership. Not to mention, of course, those supernatural tools that a prayerful bishop thinks of first in times of trial. Thus, my opinion that Finn is being too kind; at the very least, there are more arrows in his quiver than a quick read of his essay lets on.

Anyone who follows American Catholic media issues knows that, over the years, some other groups using the name “Catholic” for their operations — groups with, frankly, a better claim to be Catholic than the National Catholic Reporter could ever assert — have dropped that name when asked or directed to do so by ecclesiastical authority. Such actions speak directly to and well of their sensus Ecclesiae.

The most notorious and neuralgic refusal to comply, however, remains that of the National Catholic Reporter.

THE NATIONAL CATHOLIC REPORTER REPORTS ON ITS CASTIGATION BY BISHOP ROBERT FINN

Kansas City bishop says NCR undermines the faith

http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/kansas-city-bishop-says-ncr-undermines-faith

By Thomas C. Fox, January 27, 2013

Kansas City-St. Joseph, Mo., Bishop Robert Finn wrote Friday the National Catholic Reporter is undermining church teachings. He cited coverage of women’s ordination, artificial contraception, sexual morality in general, and the “lionizing” of dissident theologies.

His remarks appeared in a column titled “The Bishop’s Role In Fostering The Mission Of The Catholic Media.” It was posted in the online edition of the official diocesan newspaper, the Catholic Key.

The bishop praised the work of the Key and went on to write:

In a different way, I am sorry to say, my attention has been drawn once again to the National Catholic Reporter, a newspaper with headquarters in this Diocese. I have received letters and other complaints about NCR from the beginning of my time here. In the last months I have been deluged with emails and other correspondence from Catholics concerned about the editorial stances of the Reporter: officially condemning Church teaching on the ordination of women, insistent undermining of Church teaching on artificial contraception and sexual morality in general, lionizing dissident theologies while rejecting established Magisterial teaching, and a litany of other issues.

My predecessor bishops have taken different approaches to the challenge. Bishop Charles Helmsing in October of 1968 issued a condemnation of the National Catholic Reporter and asked the publishers to remove the name “Catholic” from their title — to no avail. From my perspective, NCR’s positions against authentic Church teaching and leadership have not changed trajectory in the intervening decades.

When early in my tenure I requested that the paper submit their bona fides as a Catholic media outlet in accord with the expectations of Church law, they declined to participate indicating that they considered themselves an “independent newspaper which commented on ‘things Catholic.'” At other times, correspondence has seemed to reach a dead end.

16.

In light of the number of recent expressions of concern, I have a responsibility as the local bishop to instruct the Faithful about the problematic nature of this media source, which bears the name “Catholic.” While I remain open to substantive and respectful discussion with the legitimate representatives of NCR, I find that my ability to influence the National Catholic Reporter toward fidelity to the Church seems limited to the supernatural level. For this we pray: St. Francis De Sales, intercede for us.

Finn seems to imply NCR has had bad relations with its local bishops since 1968. This has not been the case. Helmsing’s successors — Bishop John Sullivan and Bishop Raymond Boland — had cordial relations with NCR. Once, Boland came to our Kansas City, Mo., office and blessed our building as we consulted with him about use of new emerging media technologies. Later, Boland spoke at NCR‘s 40th anniversary ceremony in Washington, D.C.

In an email, former NCR publisher and Sister of Saint Anne, Rita Larivee, who was publisher at the time of Finn’s early years as diocesan bishop, remembers having respectful meetings with Finn. She wrote:

I personally visited with him in his office to welcome him to the diocese. We had a fine conversation. But during his first year, he made many significant changes within the diocese that caused many concerns for various groups. Because of these shifts in previous policies, NCR wrote a story about this period of transition — Dennis Coday (now NCR editor) wrote the story. Again, I visited with Bishop Finn in his office to assure him that this was a story about the changes that had taken place, as NCR does with other dioceses, but that it was not an article about him personally. …

Throughout my time at NCR, Bishop Finn was assured of direct access to me, and I remember always responding immediately to any of his concerns. We always had a very cordial relationship. We agreed on the role of journalism and the accountability of institutions.

NCR is proud to call itself a Catholic publication. We report and comment on church matters, including official teachings. We also report and comment on those who call into question some of these official teachings. Meanwhile, we are a part of the Catholic Press Association of the United States and Canada*, an independent membership association comprised of Catholic media organizations and individuals. The CPA is an approved Catholic organization listed in The Official Catholic Directory, commonly called the Kennedy directory. The chairman of the Committee of Communications of the U.S. Catholic bishops’ conference, currently Bishop John Wester of Salt Lake City, is the honorary president of the CPA. CPA judges have repeatedly cited us with awards for our coverage of the church.

As NCR editor-at-large (and former NCR editor) Tom Roberts recently wrote: “NCR‘s bona fides rests on its nearly 50 years of professional journalism in service to the church … That both hierarchy and laity would find us, variously, a boon to faith and an annoyance, is to us a certain confirmation that we are fulfilling our intent to report the activity of the church as widely and deeply as possible.”

After a local judge found Finn guilty last year of failing to report suspected child abuse involving a local priest, NCR published an editorial calling on Finn to either resign or be removed from his position. NCR and other local news outlets, including The Kansas City Star, provided ongoing coverage of the incident.

NCR was established in the diocese in October 1964.

[*Editor’s Note: This sentence originally stated that the Catholic Press Association is “sanctioned” by the U.S. Catholic bishops’ conference. The sentence has been edited to better reflect the CPA’s officially standing as spelled out in the association’s constitution and bylaws.]

Over 250 readers’ comments here, but though this is a dissident site and scores of liberals joined in the anti-Bishop/Church tirade, the number of defenders of Bishop Finn and the Church is heartening.

UCAN REPORTS ON NCR‘S CASTIGATION BY THE CANON LAWYER

Canon lawyer joins critics of National Catholic Reporter

http://www.ucanindia.in/news/canon-lawyer-joins-critics-of-national-catholic-reporter/20159/daily

January 29, 2013

The lawyer expands on Bishop Finn’s comments, reported yesterday in our Editor’s Choice section, by calling the use of the word “Catholic” illicit in this case.

[The Canon Lawyer‘s article seen on pages 15, 16 is reproduced here by UCAN. From the sentence excerpted immediately above, it is seen that UCAN has reproduced the NCR story of January 27 on Bishop Finn‘s article, a day earlier. UCAN does not appear to lose any time in standing shoulder to shoulder with the NCR.]


THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK – AND UCAN REPORTS IT

National Catholic Reporter answers its critics

http://www.ucanindia.in/news/national-catholic-reporter-answers-its-critics/20180/daily

January 31, 2013

This US-based news service has received flak lately for its perceived anti-Church stance, with one canon lawyer asserting that the use of the word ‘Catholic’ in its title was illicit. Now its publisher responds.

United States:  Kansas City-St. Joseph, Mo., Bishop Robert Finn wrote Friday the National Catholic Reporter is undermining church teachings. He cited coverage of women’s ordination, artificial contraception, sexual morality in general, and the “lionizing” of dissident theologies.

17.


His remarks appeared in a column titled “The Bishop’s Role In Fostering The Mission Of The Catholic Media.” It was posted in the online edition of the official diocesan newspaper, the Catholic Key.
The bishop praised the work of the Key and went on to write:

In a different way, I am sorry to say, my attention has been drawn once again to the National Catholic Reporter, a newspaper with headquarters in this Diocese. I have received letters and other complaints about NCR from the beginning of my time here. In the last months I have been deluged with emails and other correspondence from Catholics concerned about the editorial stances of the Reporter: officially condemning Church teaching on the ordination of women, insistent undermining of Church teaching on artificial contraception and sexual morality in general, lionizing dissident theologies while rejecting established Magisterial teaching, and a litany of other issues.
My predecessor bishops have taken different approaches to the challenge. Bishop Charles Helmsing in October of 1968 issued a condemnation of the National Catholic Reporter and asked the publishers to remove the name “Catholic” from their title — to no avail. From my perspective, NCR’s positions against authentic Church teaching and leadership have not changed trajectory in the intervening decades.
When early in my tenure I requested that the paper submit their bona fides as a Catholic media outlet in accord with the expectations of Church law, they declined to participate indicating that they considered themselves an “independent newspaper which commented on ‘things Catholic.'” At other times, correspondence has seemed to reach a dead end.
In light of the number of recent expressions of concern, I have a responsibility as the local bishop to instruct the Faithful about the problematic nature of this media source, which bears the name “Catholic.” While I remain open to substantive and respectful discussion with the legitimate representatives of NCR, I find that my ability to influence the National Catholic Reporter toward fidelity to the Church seems limited to the supernatural level. For this we pray: St. Francis De Sales intercede for us.


Finn seems to imply NCR has had bad relations with its local bishops since 1968. This has not been the case. Helmsing’s successors — Bishop John Sullivan and Bishop Raymond Boland — had cordial relations with NCR. Once, Boland came to our Kansas City, Mo., office and blessed our building as we consulted with him about use of new emerging media technologies. Later, Boland spoke at NCR’s 40th anniversary ceremony in Washington, D.C.
In an email, former NCR publisher and Sister of Saint Anne, Rita Larivee, who was publisher at the time of Finn’s early years as diocesan bishop, remembers having respectful meetings with Finn. She wrote:
I personally visited with him in his office to welcome him to the diocese. We had a fine conversation. But during his first year, he made many significant changes within the diocese that caused many concerns for various groups. Because of these shifts in previous policies, NCR wrote a story about this period of transition — Dennis Coday (now NCR editor) wrote the story. Again, I visited with Bishop Finn in his office to assure him that this was a story about the changes that had taken place, as NCR does with other dioceses, but that it was not an article about him personally. …
Throughout my time at NCR, Bishop Finn was assured of direct access to me, and I remember always responding immediately to any of his concerns. We always had a very cordial relationship. We agreed on the role of journalism and the accountability of institutions.
NCR is proud to call itself a Catholic publication. We report and comment on church matters, including official teachings. We also report and comment on those who call into question some of these official teachings.

Source: National Catholic Reporter

MY CLOSING COMMENTS

It is reliably reported that the anti-Catholic Church National Catholic Reporter has a readership of around 33,000 – and declining.

But, it is a matter of great distress for faithful Catholics that the NCR is tolerated, cited and even honoured by Catholic media. An example of the last is that Fr. Thomas Rosica of Salt and Light TV gave an award to John L. Allen Jr., Vatican Correspondent of NCR for excellence in journalism. If the NCR cannot be licitly termed as “Catholic”, all those media that facilitate the dissemination of its heretical positions and felicitate its writers should be clubbed along with the NCR. That would include UCAN and Mangalorean Catholics [see page 2] and its owner-moderator, Ancy D’Souza Paladka of Mumbai, India. Virginia Saldanha, the strident voice of the pro-women’s ordination lobby in India, is one of the few Indians who
write for the NCR, or whose stories, along with those of her Ecclesia of Women in Asia [EWA] and allies are given importance, others being Janina Gomes and liberal theologians like Fr. Francis Gonsalves, S.J.

Not surprisingly, NCR stories are immediately picked up by UCAN. A few examples:

1.
http://natcath.org/NCR_Online/archives2/1999d/120399/120399h.htm December 1999

2. http://www.ucanews.com/story-archive/?post_name=/2000/05/30/nuns-pledge-to-empower-women-build-support-groups-in-war-situation&post_id=16147 May 2000

3. http://natcath.org/NCR_Online/archives2/2001b/050401/050401p.htm May 2001

4. http://www.ucanews.com/story-archive/?post_name=/2001/06/19/catholic-women-theologians-first-assembly-seeks-to-end-male-monopoly&post_id=18669 June 2001

5. http://www.nationalcatholicreporter.org/globalpers/gp121803.htm December 2003

6. http://www.nationalcatholicreporter.org/globalpers/gp072005.htm July 2005

18.

7. http://www.ucanews.com/story-archive/?post_name=/2005/08/29/church-urged-to-be-more-feminine-and-to-respond-to-womens-needs&post_id=26210 August 2005

8. http://www.ucanews.com/story-archive/?post_name=/2007/12/03/empower-women-to-foster-life-says-fabc-official&post_id=27950 December 2007

9. http://ncronline.org/news/women-religious/asian-women-religious-caught-between-ideals-realities November 2009

10. http://www.ucanews.com/2010/03/15/is-the-ball-now-in-the-women%E2%80%99s-court/
March 2010

11. http://www.ucanews.com/2011/09/28/old-heirarchies-inhibit-the-asian-church/ September 2011

12. http://ncronline.org/news/women/voice-women and
http://www.ucanews.com/2011/10/24/a-voice-for-women/, October 2011

13. http://blogs.ucanews.com/give-us-this-day/2011/11/29/first-impressions-of-the-first-sunday/ November 2011

14. http://www.nationalcatholicreporter.org/globalpers/gp101204.htm [This is about Fr. Jacob Parappally MSFS, see page 2]

15. http://www.nationalcatholicreporter.org/globalpers/gp101904.htm

The same can be said of the other Indian pro-women’s ordination theologian that I mentioned on page 2, Astrid Lobo Gajiwala: http://www.nationalcatholicreporter.org/update/asia_meet/fabcaug19.htm, etc.

I had completed this report in 11 pages on
JANUARY 24, 2013
which, as I came to realize a few days later, is the day of the Church’s celebration of the Feast of St. Francis De Sales, the patron saint of journalists and the Catholic press!

In the completed reported, I appear to have prophetically declared that the National Catholic Reporter is NOT Catholic, see “The reason for this report” on page 2.

In my closing statements on page 11, I wrote, “Agence France-Presse [AFP] describes the NCR as “An independent Roman Catholic newspaper” [pages 8, 9]. The NCR may be independent, but it is certainly NOT ROMAN CATHOLIC, not by a long shot. Neither is UCAN which shares the NCR‘s footprints.

The very next day, Bishop Robert Finn‘s statement declaring that the National Catholic Reporter cannot licitly describe itself as “Catholic” was released; hence this update.

One of the main reasons proffered by the Bishop for his declaration was, see page 13, “the editorial stances of the [National Catholic] Reporter: officially condemning Church teaching on the ordination of women“.

UCAN and Virginia Saldanha and
her Ecclesia of Women in Asia are guilty of the same heresy. So, we eagerly await a statement of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences [FABC] and the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India [CBCI] on UCAN — the NCR‘s echo — the EWA and Virginia Saldanha‘s Catherine of Siena Virtual College.

Considering that some Indian Bishops – especially those of the Archdiocese of Bombay — are aware of the Indian situation courtesy our reports of MARCH/APRIL/MAY 2012 [links on page 1], we are, however, not a bit optimistic that even a single Indian bishop will display the slightest shade of orthodoxy and loyalty to Rome as Bishop Robert Finn did.

BOTH, THE NCR AS WELL AS UCAN “MODERATE” COMMENTS BY NOT PUBLISHING THEM

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/bishop-national-catholic-reporter-undermines-church-teaching/:

We should boycott such media. This National Catholic Reporter claims it a “catholic” media while opposing the Pope, Bishops, clergy and many of the Catholic teachings. Continuous work for the awareness of the parishioners about its anti- catholic nature is required at parish level. Once when I wrote to them asking why “a catholic media like yours tears the Church teachings and accuse all clergy…”, I got a reply accusing me as a moron using very uncivilized language. Then I stopped writing. KC Thomas

http://catholickey.org/2013/01/25/the-bishops-role-in-fostering-the-mission-of-the-catholic-media/:

My comments at the Reporter have been removed and I have actually been banned from commenting there! My comments expressing faithfulness to the Magisterium do not appear welcome there! Pierre

At http://www.ucanews.com/2008/08/20/mirror-room-helps-people-discover-divinity-within-themselves/?key=indore+mirror, I posted the following comment to UCAN on May 29, 2009, at 5:45 pm against a New Age meditation centre of Indore priest Fr. Varghese Alengaden:

A detailed report on this subject, with feedback and comments from Catholics, will be posted shortly on our ministry’s website at http://www.ephesians-511.net. Thank you UCAN for publishing this story…

Michael Prabhu, Metamorphose Catholic Ministries, Chennai; Joint Editor, The Catholic Times [Registered], Chennai.

The above comment was “awaiting moderation” even several days after its posting. There are more such, but I’m skipping them. These dissident sites cannot themselves brook any dissidence!!

However, Virginia Saldanha‘s long New-Agey comment is the last but one published on the topic. 19.

The National Catholic Reporter [NCR] is a liberal, dissenting [anti-Rome, heretical] publication that provides a platform for the writings of a motley array of feminists, anti-lifers and rebels of all sorts, see http://www.ourladyswarriors.org/dissent/disspeop.htm.

ON DISSENT

Blessed John Paul II stated in 1987 on a visit to the United States, ”It is sometimes claimed that dissent from the Magisterium is totally compatible with being a ‘good Catholic’ and poses no obstacles to the reception of the sacraments,” the Pope said, using the term for the church’s teaching authority. ”This is a grave error that challenges the teaching office of the bishops of the United States and elsewhere.”

ON USING THE TERM “CATHOLIC”

Michael Voris ran into this problem in 2012 as he was using RealCatholic.com as his internet domain until he was told by the Archdiocese of Detroit where he is based that he could no longer legitimately include “Catholic”. He changed his website to ChurchMilitant.tv rather than face canonical censures

Canon #216: Since they share the Church’s mission, all Christ’s faithful have the mission to promote and support apostolic action, by their own initiative, undertaken according to their state and condition. No initiative, however, can lay claim to the title “catholic” without the consent of the competent ecclesiastical authority.

Canon #300: No association may call itself “catholic” without the consent of the competent ecclesiastical authority, in accordance with Can. 312.

CHAPTER
II : PUBLIC
ASSOCIATIONS OF CHRIST‘S FAITHFUL

Canon #312 §1: The authority which is competent to establish
public
associations is:

1, the Holy
See, for universal and international
associations

2, the Episcopal
Conference in its own territory, for national
associations which by their very establishment are intended for work throughout the whole nation;

3, the diocesan
Bishop, each in his own territory, but not the diocesan
Administrator, for diocesan
associations, with the exception, however, of associations the right to whose establishment is reserved to others by apostolic
privilege.

Canon #312 §2: The written
consent of the diocesan
Bishop is required for the valid
establishment of an association or branch of an association in the diocese even though it is done in virtue of an apostolic
privilege. Permission, however, which is given by the diocesan
Bishop for the foundation of a house of a religious
institute, is valid also for the establishment in the same house, or in a church
attached to it, of an association which is proper to that institute.

20.

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Categories: Ordination of Women Priests Movement in India

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1 reply

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EPHESIANS-511.NET- A Roman Catholic Ministry Exposing Errors in the Indian Church Michael Prabhu, METAMORPHOSE, #12,Dawn Apartments, 22,Leith Castle South Street, Chennai – 600 028, Tamilnadu, India. Phone: +91 (44) 24611606 E-mail: michaelprabhu@vsnl.net, http://www.ephesians-511.net

EPHESIANS-511.NET- A Roman Catholic Ministry Exposing Errors in the Indian Church

Michael Prabhu, METAMORPHOSE, #12,Dawn Apartments, 22,Leith Castle South Street, Chennai - 600 028, Tamilnadu, India. Phone: +91 (44) 24611606 E-mail: michaelprabhu@vsnl.net, http://www.ephesians-511.net

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