Quo Vadis, Papa Francisco? THE POPE SPEAKS ON CLIMATE CHANGE, AIR POLLUTION AND A HERETICAL PRIEST BUT EVADES PRO-LIFE ISSUES


SEPTEMBER 26, 2015

Quo Vadis, Papa Francisco?

15 – THE POPE SPEAKS ON CLIMATE CHANGE, AIR POLLUTION AND A HERETICAL PRIEST BUT EVADES PRO-LIFE ISSUES

 

When I heard and read Pope Francis’ White House speech and his address to the US Congress, I was shocked and I immediately determined to analyse them in depth and expose their errors, omissions and general shortcomings. But I was pre-empted by a number of critiques that hit the Internet. So, I decided to forego troubling with my analysis and reproduce a few of the conservative Catholic media articles along with selected readers’ comments and feelings that I concur with.

 

The Pope at the White House: as the son of migrants, happy to be a guest in a country largely built by such families

http://www.news.va/en/news/the-pope-at-the-white-house-as-the-son-of-migrants

Vatican City, September 24, 2015

Yesterday more than two hundred thousand people awaited Pope Francis outside the White House, where shortly after 9 a.m. local time (3 p.m. in Rome) he was welcomed by President Barack Obama and the First Lady, Michelle Obama. They accompanied him to the podium erected in the grounds of the presidential residence, where before two thousand people the Holy Father gave his first address in the United States.

In his discourse he affirmed that, “as the son of an immigrant family, I am happy to be a guest in this country, which was largely built by such families”, and highlighted the commitment of American Catholics, along with their fellow citizens, to constructing a tolerant and inclusive society and to rejecting every form of unjust discrimination. The Pope also mentioned the importance of the right to religious freedom and the duty of defending it from anything that might threaten or compromise it.

Francis praised Barack Obama’s initiative for reducing air pollution. “Accepting the urgency, it seems clear to me also that climate change is a problem which can no longer be left to a future generation”, he said. “When it comes to the care of our ‘common home’, we are living at a critical moment of history. We still have time to make the changes needed to bring about ‘a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change’. Such change demands on our part a serious and responsible recognition not only of the kind of world we may be leaving to our children, but also to the millions of people living under a system which has overlooked them. Our common home has been part of this group of the excluded which cries out to heaven and which today powerfully strikes our homes, our cities and our societies. To use a telling phrase of the Reverend Martin Luther King, we can say that we have defaulted on a promissory note and now is the time to honour it. … Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home. As Christians inspired by this certainty, we wish to commit ourselves to the conscious and responsible care of our common home”.

The Holy Father also mentioned recent efforts “to mend broken relationships and to open new doors to cooperation within our human family” which “represent positive steps along the path of reconciliation, justice and freedom. I would like all men and women of good will in this great nation to support the efforts of the international community to protect the vulnerable in our world and to stimulate integral and inclusive models of development, so that our brothers and sisters everywhere may know the blessings of peace and prosperity which God wills for all his children”.

“Mr. President”, he concluded, “once again I thank you for your welcome, and I look forward to these days in your country. God bless America!”

At the end of the welcome ceremony, the Pope and the president retired to the Oval Office where an exchange of gifts and a private discussion took place, attended by members of President Obama’s family. The Pope’s gift was a bronze medallion commemorating the Eighth World Meeting of Families, to be celebrated on 27 September in Philadelphia.

 

 

What Did Pope Francis Say About the Unborn at the White House?

http://www.onepeterfive.com/what-did-pope-francis-say-about-the-unborn-at-the-white-house/

By Steve Skojec, September 23, 2015

 

 

Did you see Pope Francis’s remarks about the protection of the unborn at the White House this morning?

 

Mr. President, I want to take this opportunity to encourage you to foster a culture of life in this great nation.  Accepting the urgency, it seems clear to me also that this unconscionable taking of innocent human life is a problem which can no longer be left to a future generation.  When it comes to the care of our own children, we are living at a critical moment of history.  We still have time to make the changes needed, but we must act. We must understand — as we’ve been forced to confront in a recent series of investigative videos seen around the world — that those involved in the abortion industry “justify even infanticide, following the same arguments used to justify the right to abortion. In this way, we revert to a state of barbarism which one hoped had been left behind forever.” (Evangelium Vitae, 14).  Such change demands on our part a serious and responsible recognition not only of the kind of world we have created where we can so cruelly destroy our own children, but also of the millions of people who have already fallen victim to this barbarism.  Our common humanity should motivate us to end, once and for all, the legalized eradication of this voiceless group which suffers the most brutal form of exclusion and in so suffering cries out to heaven, the results of which today powerfully strikes our homes, our cities and our societies. To use a telling phrase of the Reverend Martin Luther King, we cannot win if we are willing to sacrifice the futures of our children for immediate personal comfort and safety. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

We know by faith that our Creator has said, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you…” (Jer. 1:5).  As Christians inspired by this certainty, we wish to commit ourselves to the conscious and responsible care and protection of our most vulnerable, our future generations.

 

You didn’t? Me neither. The answer to the question posed by the title of this post is, unfortunately: nothing. He didn’t make any comments about the unborn at the White House. What you just read is what I wished was in his speech instead of what I found there.

This is what he really said in that section:

 

Mr. President, I find it encouraging that you are proposing an initiative for reducing air pollution.  Accepting the urgency, it seems clear to me also that climate change is a problem which can no longer be left to a future generation.  When it comes to the care of our “common home”, we are living at a critical moment of history.  We still have time to make the changes needed to bring about “a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change” (Laudato Si’, 13).  Such change demands on our part a serious and responsible recognition not only of the kind of world we may be leaving to our children, but also to the millions of people living under a system which has overlooked them.  Our common home has been part of this group of the excluded which cries out to heaven and which today powerfully strikes our homes, our cities and our societies.  To use a telling phrase of the Reverend Martin Luther King, we can say that we have defaulted on a promissory note and now is the time to honor it.

We know by faith that “the Creator does not abandon us; he never forsakes his loving plan or repents of having created us. Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home” (Laudato Si’, 13).  As Christians inspired by this certainty, we wish to commit ourselves to the conscious and responsible care of our common home.

 

There was also something about being “committed to building a society which is truly tolerant and inclusive, to safe-guarding the rights of individuals and communities, and to rejecting every form of unjust discrimination”. A brief mention of religious liberty made it in, too. But a statement about protecting the unborn in the presence of the most pro-abortion president in US history — especially as Congress is attempting to defund Planned Parenthood — didn’t make the cut.

Still, a Catholic can dream. Here’s hoping that in the Congressional address tomorrow, our modern holocaust gets more than a passing mention.

 

7 out of 87 readers’ comments:

1. “What Did Pope Francis Say About the Unborn at the White House?” Nothing. Like all committed Leftist, Pope Francis is a leftist first and Catholic second….a distant second.

2. Great post, Steve. I was moved at the words I initially read, and was amazed that he said them. Then you had to bum me out. But you didn’t surprise me. This is the reality we face.

3. And Jesus wept.

4. I am sick to my stomach. “I find it encouraging that you are proposing an initiative for reducing air pollution.” You find it encouraging? Because air pollution is a pressing issue for the Catholic Church? This papacy has become a parody.

5. For a moment I was encouraged! But then I saw it was wishful thinking and my hopes were dashed.

6. Awww! I read the first paragraph and got tears in my eyes. Then I read it wasn’t the real speech. Then I was more disappointed by the real one. For just a moment, I was about to change my negative opinion of Pope Francis.

7. I notice that Pope Francis never says anything that his hearers or a majority of his audience does not want to hear. Remind me of these TV evangelists who get a large following that way too.

 

 

Full Text of Pope Francis’ Congressional Address

http://www.onepeterfive.com/full-text-of-pope-franciss-congressional-address/

(Steve Skojec) September 24, 2015

The following is the prepared text of the speech delivered today (Text provided courtesy of Vatican Radio).

 

 

Mr. Vice-President,

Mr. Speaker,

Honorable Members of Congress,

Dear Friends,

I am most grateful for your invitation to address this Joint Session of Congress in “the land of the free and the home of the brave”.  I would like to think that the reason for this is that I too am a son of this great continent, from which we have all received so much and toward which we share a common responsibility.

Each son or daughter of a given country has a mission, a personal and social responsibility. Your own responsibility as members of Congress is to enable this country, by your legislative activity, to grow as a nation.  You are the face of its people, their representatives.  You are called to defend and preserve the dignity of your fellow citizens in the tireless and demanding pursuit of the common good, for this is the chief aim of all politics.  A political society endures when it seeks, as a vocation, to satisfy common needs by stimulating the growth of all its members, especially those in situations of greater vulnerability or risk. Legislative activity is always based on care for the people.  To this you have been invited, called and convened by those who elected you.

Yours is a work which makes me reflect in two ways on the figure of Moses.  On the one hand, the patriarch and lawgiver of the people of Israel symbolizes the need of peoples to keep alive their sense of unity by means of just legislation.  On the other, the figure of Moses leads us directly to God and thus to the transcendent dignity of the human being.  Moses provides us with a good synthesis of your work: you are asked to protect, by means of the law, the image and likeness fashioned by God on every human face.

Today I would like not only to address you, but through you the entire people of the United States. Here, together with their representatives, I would like to take this opportunity to dialogue with the many thousands of men and women who strive each day to do an honest day’s work, to bring home their daily bread, to save money and –one step at a time – to build a better life for their families.  These are men and women who are not concerned simply with paying their taxes, but in their own quiet way sustain the life of society.  They generate solidarity by their actions, and they create organizations which offer a helping hand to those most in need.

I would also like to enter into dialogue with the many elderly persons who are a storehouse of wisdom forged by experience, and who seek in many ways, especially through volunteer work, to share their stories and their insights.  I know that many of them are retired, but still active; they keep working to build up this land.  I also want to dialogue with all those young people who are working to realize their great and noble aspirations, who are not led astray by facile proposals, and who face difficult situations, often as a result of immaturity on the part of many adults.  I wish to dialogue with all of you, and I would like to do so through the historical memory of your people.

My visit takes place at a time when men and women of good will are marking the anniversaries of several great Americans.  The complexities of history and the reality of human weakness notwithstanding, these men and women, for all their many differences and limitations, were able by hard work and self-sacrifice – some at the cost of their lives – to build a better future.  They shaped fundamental values which will endure forever in the spirit of the American people.  A people with this spirit can live through many crises, tensions and conflicts, while always finding the resources to move forward, and to do so with dignity.   These men and women offer us a way of seeing and interpreting reality.  In honoring their memory, we are inspired, even amid conflicts, and in the here and now of each day, to draw upon our deepest cultural reserves.

I would like to mention four of these Americans: Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and Thomas Merton.

This year marks the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the guardian of liberty, who labored tirelessly that “this nation, under God, [might] have a new birth of freedom”.  Building a future of freedom requires love of the common good and cooperation in a spirit of subsidiarity and solidarity.

All of us are quite aware of, and deeply worried by, the disturbing social and political situation of the world today.  Our world is increasingly a place of violent conflict, hatred and brutal atrocities, committed even in the name of God and of religion.  We know that no religion is immune from forms of individual delusion or ideological extremism.  This means that we must be especially attentive to every type of fundamentalism, whether religious or of any other kind.  A delicate balance is required to combat violence perpetrated in the name of a religion, an ideology or an economic system, while also safeguarding religious freedom, intellectual freedom and individual freedoms.  But there is another temptation which we must especially guard against: the simplistic reductionism which sees only good or evil; or, if you will, the righteous and sinners.  The contemporary world, with its open wounds which affect so many of our brothers and sisters, demands that we confront every form of polarization which would divide it into these two camps.  We know that in the attempt to be freed of the enemy without, we can be tempted to feed the enemy within.  To imitate the hatred and violence of tyrants and murderers is the best way to take their place.  That is something which you, as a people, reject.

Our response must instead be one of hope and healing, of peace and justice.  We are asked to summon the courage and the intelligence to resolve today’s many geopolitical and economic crises. Even in the developed world, the effects of unjust structures and actions are all too apparent.  Our efforts must aim at restoring hope, righting wrongs, maintaining commitments, and thus promoting the well-being of individuals and of peoples.  We must move forward together, as one, in a renewed spirit of fraternity and solidarity, cooperating generously for the common good.

The challenges facing us today call for a renewal of that spirit of cooperation, which has accomplished so much good throughout the history of the United States.  The complexity, the gravity and the urgency of these challenges demand that we pool our resources and talents, and resolve to support one another, with respect for our differences and our convictions of conscience.

 

 

 

 

In this land, the various religious denominations have greatly contributed to building and strengthening society.  It is important that today, as in the past, the voice of faith continue to be heard, for it is a voice of fraternity and love, which tries to bring out the best in each person and in each society.  Such cooperation is a powerful resource in the battle to eliminate new global forms of slavery, born of grave injustices which can be overcome only through new policies and new forms of social consensus.

Here I think of the political history of the United States, where democracy is deeply rooted in the mind of the American people.  All political activity must serve and promote the good of the human person and be based on respect for his or her dignity.  “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” (Declaration of Independence, 4 July 1776).  If politics must truly be at the service of the human person, it follows that it cannot be a slave to the economy and finance.  Politics is, instead, an expression of our compelling need to live as one, in order to build as one the greatest common good: that of a community which sacrifices particular interests in order to share, in justice and peace, its goods, its interests, its social life.  I do not underestimate the difficulty that this involves, but I encourage you in this effort.

Here too I think of the march which Martin Luther King led from Selma to Montgomery fifty years ago as part of the campaign to fulfill his “dream” of full civil and political rights for African Americans.  That dream continues to inspire us all.  I am happy that America continues to be, for many, a land of “dreams”.  Dreams which lead to action, to participation, to commitment.  Dreams which awaken what is deepest and truest in the life of a people.

In recent centuries, millions of people came to this land to pursue their dream of building a future in freedom.  We, the people of this continent, are not fearful of foreigners, because most of us were once foreigners.  I say this to you as the son of immigrants, knowing that so many of you are also descended from immigrants.  Tragically, the rights of those who were here long before us were not always respected.  For those peoples and their nations, from the heart of American democracy, I wish to reaffirm my highest esteem and appreciation.  Those first contacts were often turbulent and violent, but it is difficult to judge the past by the criteria of the present.  Nonetheless, when the stranger in our midst appeals to us, we must not repeat the sins and the errors of the past.  We must resolve now to live as nobly and as justly as possible, as we educate new generations not to turn their back on our “neighbors” and everything around us.  Building a nation calls us to recognize that we must constantly relate to others, rejecting a mindset of hostility in order to adopt one of reciprocal subsidiarity, in a constant effort to do our best.  I am confident that we can do this.

Our world is facing a refugee crisis of a magnitude not seen since the Second World War.  This presents us with great challenges and many hard decisions.  On this continent, too, thousands of persons are led to travel north in search of a better life for themselves and for their loved ones, in search of greater opportunities.  Is this not what we want for our own children?  We must not be taken aback by their numbers, but rather view them as persons, seeing their faces and listening to their stories, trying to respond as best we can to their situation.  To respond in a way which is always humane, just and fraternal.  We need to avoid a common temptation nowadays: to discard whatever proves troublesome.  Let us remember the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” (Mt 7:12).

This Rule points us in a clear direction.  Let us treat others with the same passion and compassion with which we want to be treated.  Let us seek for others the same possibilities which we seek for ourselves.  Let us help others to grow, as we would like to be helped ourselves.  In a word, if we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities.  The yardstick we use for others will be the yardstick which time will use for us.  The Golden Rule also reminds us of our responsibility to protect and defend human life at every stage of its development.

This conviction has led me, from the beginning of my ministry, to advocate at different levels for the global abolition of the death penalty.  I am convinced that this way is the best, since every life is sacred, every human person is endowed with an inalienable dignity, and society can only benefit from the rehabilitation of those convicted of crimes.  Recently my brother bishops here in the United States renewed their call for the abolition of the death penalty.  Not only do I support them, but I also offer encouragement to all those who are convinced that a just and necessary punishment must never exclude the dimension of hope and the goal of rehabilitation.

In these times when social concerns are so important, I cannot fail to mention the Servant of God Dorothy Day, who founded the Catholic Worker Movement.  Her social activism, her passion for justice and for the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel, her faith, and the example of the saints.

How much progress has been made in this area in so many parts of the world!  How much has been done in these first years of the third millennium to raise people out of extreme poverty!  I know that you share my conviction that much more still needs to be done, and that in times of crisis and economic hardship a spirit of global solidarity must not be lost.  At the same time I would encourage you to keep in mind all those people around us who are trapped in a cycle of poverty.  They too need to be given hope.  The fight against poverty and hunger must be fought constantly and on many fronts, especially in its causes.  I know that many Americans today, as in the past, are working to deal with this problem.

It goes without saying that part of this great effort is the creation and distribution of wealth.  The right use of natural resources, the proper application of technology and the harnessing of the spirit of enterprise are essential elements of an economy which seeks to be modern, inclusive and sustainable.  “Business is a noble vocation, directed to producing wealth and improving the world.  It can be a fruitful source of prosperity for the area in which it operates, especially if it sees the creation of jobs as an essential part of its service to the common good” (Laudato Si’, 129).  This common good also includes the earth, a central theme of the encyclical which I recently wrote in order to “enter into dialogue with all people about our common home” (ibid. 3).  “We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all” (ibid., 14).

In Laudato Si’, I call for a courageous and responsible effort to “redirect our steps” (ibid. 61), and to avert the most serious effects of the environmental deterioration caused by human activity.  I am convinced that we can make a difference and I have no doubt that the United States – and this Congress – have an important role to play. 

 

 

 

Now is the time for courageous actions and strategies, aimed at implementing a “culture of care” (ibid. 231) and “an integrated approach to combating poverty, restoring dignity to the excluded, and at the same time protecting nature” (ibid., 139).  “We have the freedom needed to limit and direct technology” (ibid. 112); “to devise intelligent ways of… developing and limiting our power” (ibid. 78); and to put technology “at the service of another type of progress, one which is healthier, more human, more social, more integral” (ibid. 112).  In this regard, I am confident that America’s outstanding academic and research institutions can make a vital contribution in the years ahead.

A century ago, at the beginning of the Great War, which Pope Benedict XV termed a “pointless slaughter”, another notable American was born: the Cistercian monk Thomas Merton.  He remains a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people.  In his autobiography he wrote: “I came into the world.  Free by nature, in the image of God, I was nevertheless the prisoner of my own violence and my own selfishness, in the image of the world into which I was born.  That world was the picture of Hell, full of men like myself, loving God, and yet hating him; born to love him, living instead in fear of hopeless self-contradictory hungers”.  Merton was above all a man of prayer, a thinker who challenged the certitudes of his time and opened new horizons for souls and for the Church.  He was also a man of dialogue, a promoter of peace between peoples and religions.

From this perspective of dialogue, I would like to recognize the efforts made in recent months to help overcome historic differences linked to painful episodes of the past.  It is my duty to build bridges and to help all men and women, in any way possible, to do the same.  When countries which have been at odds resume the path of dialogue – a dialogue which may have been interrupted for the most legitimate of reasons – new opportunities open up for all.  This has required, and requires, courage and daring, which is not the same as irresponsibility.  A good political leader is one who, with the interests of all in mind, seizes the moment in a spirit of openness and pragmatism.  A good political leader always opts to initiate processes rather than possessing spaces (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 222-223).

Being at the service of dialogue and peace also means being truly determined to minimize and, in the long term, to end the many armed conflicts throughout our world.  Here we have to ask ourselves: Why are deadly weapons being sold to those who plan to inflict untold suffering on individuals and society?  Sadly, the answer, as we all know, is simply for money: money that is drenched in blood, often innocent blood.  In the face of this shameful and culpable silence, it is our duty to confront the problem and to stop the arms trade.

Three sons and a daughter of this land, four individuals and four dreams: Lincoln, liberty; Martin Luther King, liberty in plurality and non-exclusion; Dorothy Day, social justice and the rights of persons; and Thomas Merton, the capacity for dialogue and openness to God.

Four representatives of the American people.

I will end my visit to your country in Philadelphia, where I will take part in the World Meeting of Families.  It is my wish that throughout my visit the family should be a recurrent theme.  How essential the family has been to the building of this country!  And how worthy it remains of our support and encouragement!  Yet I cannot hide my concern for the family, which is threatened, perhaps as never before, from within and without.  Fundamental relationships are being called into question, as is the very basis of marriage and the family.  I can only reiterate the importance and, above all, the richness and the beauty of family life.

In particular, I would like to call attention to those family members who are the most vulnerable, the young.  For many of them, a future filled with countless possibilities beckons, yet so many others seem disoriented and aimless, trapped in a hopeless maze of violence, abuse and despair.  Their problems are our problems.  We cannot avoid them.  We need to face them together, to talk about them and to seek effective solutions rather than getting bogged down in discussions.  At the risk of oversimplifying, we might say that we live in a culture which pressures young people not to start a family, because they lack possibilities for the future.  Yet this same culture presents others with so many options that they too are dissuaded from starting a family.

A nation can be considered great when it defends liberty as Lincoln did, when it fosters a culture which enables people to “dream” of full rights for all their brothers and sisters, as Martin Luther King sought to do; when it strives for justice and the cause of the oppressed, as Dorothy Day did by her tireless work, the fruit of a faith which becomes dialogue and sows peace in the contemplative style of Thomas Merton.

In these remarks I have sought to present some of the richness of your cultural heritage, of the spirit of the American people.  It is my desire that this spirit continue to develop and grow, so that as many young people as possible can inherit and dwell in a land which has inspired so many people to dream.

God bless America!

He’d lose credibility if he never made any Catholic touchpoints, so they’re there. And the poor desperate mass of Catholic who want so badly to see him in an orthodox light fight over scraps from the table, not realizing they’re being played. Steve Skojec, OnePeterFive

 

12 out of 35 readers’ comments:

1. This speech is full of ambiguities and contradictory “solutions” which have nothing to do with the teaching of Christ. From my reading of it, it seems the proposed solutions to grave evils focus on dialogue and consensus, rather than supernatural grace. Christ wasn’t mentioned once! Here’s an example of this: “Such cooperation is a powerful resource in the battle to eliminate new global forms of slavery, born of grave injustices which can be overcome only through new policies and new forms of social consensus.” ONLY through new policies and social consensus? How does one reach a consensus on the grave evil of abortion, when the two views are diametrically opposed and one side is advocating grave evil? Isn’t this exactly where we find ourselves today in the pro-life movement? Did you notice too that at the end, in reference to the problems faced by young people, dialogue isn’t the answer?

 

 

 

“We need to face them together, to talk about them and to seek effective solutions rather than getting bogged down in discussions. “We need to solve the problem by talking about them but not get bogged down in discussions? Isn’t talking a form of discussion? What? This speech is also so ambiguous, it could satisfy many opposing ideologies who could interrupt and spin it to their advantage and I’m sure they will. We need Christ and His supernatural grace and you’d think the head of the church Christ founded, might actually mention His name and recommend recourse to Him in a much more demonstrative way! This is beyond disappointing, it’s deeply troubling.

2. This was Pope Francis’ one chance to address the entire nation and its lawmakers. Outside of a vague reference, abortion was never mentioned. At a time when we are murdering 3,000 babies a day, this is simply appalling. 

3. I am not surprised, but sorely disappointed that the Pope, the leader of the Catholic Church, tip toed around abortion and did not address the evil it embodies.

4. It reads like a speech written by speechwriters, with Franciscan injections here and there to give the sense of authenticity. Which is not a bad thing, since Catholics are thoroughly familiar with the confusion that can result when the Holy Father writes in his own words or speaks off the cuff.

But otherwise, it’s about what you expect: No abortion holocaust, no Obergefell, ritual genuflections to St. Martin of Selma et al, false ecumenism, etc. And of course, no Jesus Christ.

5. One can see why this is precisely the sort of Pope many cardinals (and bishops) might like, because it more or less describes many of them, too.

6.  I realized in the days leading up to the Cuba and America Tour de Force FrancisChurch Style, the Pope not only sometimes says a whole bunch of crazy stuff, but also has a way of NOT saying many things he should. This latter way is what I have seen lately. To have that sort of stage and baby-kitty-foot around real, horrifying evil and real brimstone obtaining sin…….. Plus Merton, Day, Junior and Lincoln? Bummer man. Bummer.

7. The Pope just gave a State of the Union Address designed to offend no one but the American right, such as it is. Who is this man, and what have we done to deserve the punishment of this absurd pontificate?

He flies over here on his chartered jet with a vast entourage and then lectures the common man on reducing his carbon footprint. He spends, or causes to be expended, millions of dollars on another useless trip to dispense bromides he could have sent via his Twitter account, and then pulls up in a specially modified Cinquecento few of us could afford to show us how frugal he is. He demands open borders only to return to a Vatican city state with the world’s most restrictive immigration policy.

On and on this circus goes, with Francis and the world that exploits him loving every minute of the show. “It’s very entertaining to be Pope.” That’s what he told his cardinal friend. It should be his motto in Latin.

The Church is under the tyrannical rule of a Pope who acts like the dictator of a banana republic. God help us.

8. He mentioned Moses but not Jesus.

9. He is not the Vicar of Christ as both his own word and manifest deed have already judged his heresy. In so doing, he cut himself of from the office or, more likely, never assumed the office in the first place. To deny those facts is simply willful blindness. True Catholics must come together during this apostasy and reject this man.

10. Not one word about Christ. That says it all. Peter is denying Our Lord again.

11. A 33d degree Freemason could have given that speech with complete tranquility.

Very Masonic as well the lone reference to Moses, and the silence concerning Christ.

12. Like Martin Luther King Jr.,, I, too, had a dream: that Pope Francis would’ve spoken as passionately to those who made same-sex marriage the law of the land (they were sitting right in front of him for crying out loud!) & the murder of the preborn, as he’s spoken about capitalism being “the dung of the devil” or against those who don’t recycle or who use air conditioning. No doubt, the catholic media are busy spinning the web otherwise, and it’s only going to add to the confusion…

 

 

Pope’s address to the Joint Session of Congress USA: Reveals his insidious agenda

By Fr. Conrad Saldanha, a priest of the Archdiocese of Bombay

September 24, 2015

I worked on his address to the American Joint Session of Congress on an urgent basis to caution Catholics on Pope Francis and his heretical teachings. His heretical teachings are also rampant in all his speeches and writings, including his encyclicals. He only confirms the many prophecies of caution, especially by our Lady and of the various saints. 

It invites us to a time of prayer and repentance and trust in God in this time of great deception, so that we may not be carried away by such deception. Fr. Conrad  

 

Fr. Conrad: The first impression after reading the Pope’s speech is that of a politician at work, whose views are pure humanistic, socialistic and satanic (remember, a satanic speech is not always about violence but has a lot to do with the type of humanism spoken here; a language which the Pope speaks, here and elsewhere, on many different occasions) (cfr. Mt 16:23; Mk. 8:33).

Remember, in the past Pope John II had refused to address the Joint Session of Congress of the USA and Benedict XVI was never extended an invitation

Pope: Mr. Vice-President, Mr. Speaker, Honorable Members of Congress, Dear Friends,

I am most grateful for your invitation to address this Joint Session of Congress in “the land of the free and the home of the brave”. I would like to think that the reason for this is that I too am a son of this great continent, from which we have all received so much and toward which we share a common responsibility.

 

 

 

Fr. Conrad: Is it really a land of the free and brave from the Christians point of view? Or is it the land of the indulgent too and the cowards who have amassed weapons of mass destruction in the hope of saving themselves from any calamities and have acted with hegemony over others too?

Identifying himself with the others in the closing line of the above paragraph, he thus also absolves himself and even abdicates his responsibility as the Vicar of Christ and the primary teacher of Christ’s teaching.

If such is the case then the church is headed towards doom; headlong into the abyss of hell. And all who follow the teachings of this Pope and practice it will likewise be there too.

Pope: Each son or daughter of a given country has a mission, a personal and social responsibility. Your own responsibility as members of Congress is to enable this country, by your legislative activity, to grow as a nation. You are the face of its people, their representatives. You are called to defend and preserve the dignity of your fellow citizens in the tireless and demanding pursuit of the common good, for this is the chief aim of all politics. A political society endures when it seeks, as a vocation, to satisfy common needs by stimulating the growth of all its members, especially those in situations of greater vulnerability or risk. Legislative activity is always based on care for the people. To this you have been invited, called and convened by those who elected you.

Fr. Conrad: What is this personal and social mission that each son or daughter should have, according to the Pope? The subsequent speech reveals it all. One of the marked out missions statement is the “common good” to be established by humans, especially politicians apart from God.

Why is the Pope proclaiming what is contrary to the gospel or why is he not proclaiming what he is supposed to proclaim as the successor of Peter? —à

“to grow as a nation”, “You are called to defend and preserve the dignity of your fellow citizens in the tireless and demanding pursuit of the common good”, “to satisfy common needs by stimulating the growth of all its members, especially those in situations of greater vulnerability or risk” – a political agenda of the Pope!

Pope: Yours is a work which makes me reflect in two ways on the figure of Moses. On the one hand, the patriarch and lawgiver of the people of Israel symbolizes the need of peoples to keep alive their sense of unity by means of just legislation. On the other, the figure of Moses leads us directly to God and thus to the transcendent dignity of the human being. Moses provides us with a good synthesis of your work: you are asked to protect, by means of the law, the image and likeness fashioned by God on every human face.

Fr. Conrad: An erroneous aberration in interpreting Moses: “…to keep alive their sense of unity by means of just legislation” and then applying it erroneously too.

Pope: Today I would like not only to address you, but through you the entire people of the United States. Here, together with their representatives, I would like to take this opportunity to dialogue with the many thousands of men and women who strive each day to do an honest day’s work, to bring home their daily bread, to save money and –one step at a time – to build a better life for their families. These are men and women who are not concerned simply with paying their taxes, but in their own quiet way sustain the life of society. They generate solidarity by their actions, and they create organizations which offer a helping hand to those most in need.

Fr. Conrad: Humanism manifested & Gospel compromised! What dialogue and how dialogue? What does he mean by this: “to build a better life”?

Pope: I would also like to enter into dialogue with the many elderly persons who are a storehouse of wisdom forged by experience, and who seek in many ways, especially through volunteer work, to share their stories and their insights. I know that many of them are retired, but still active; they keep working to build up this land. I also want to dialogue with all those young people who are working to realize their great and noble aspirations, who are not led astray by facile proposals, and who face difficult situations, often as a result of immaturity on the part of many adults. I wish to dialogue with all of you, and I would like to do so through the historical memory of your people.

Fr. Conrad: With great seduction and deception (2 Thessalonians 2:10), “through the historical memory of your people”, he wants to dialogue with the one’s to whom he should be instead proclaiming the gospel of Christ, calling them to reconcile to Christ. (2 Cor. 5:20)

Pope: My visit takes place at a time when men and women of good will are marking the anniversaries of several great Americans. The complexities of history and the reality of human weakness notwithstanding, these men and women, for all their many differences and limitations, were able by hard work and self- sacrifice – some at the cost of their lives – to build a better future. They shaped fundamental values which will endure forever in the spirit of the American people. A people with this spirit can live through many crises, tensions and conflicts, while always finding the resources to move forward, and to do so with dignity. These men and women offer us a way of seeing and interpreting reality. In honoring their memory, we are inspired, even amid conflicts, and in the here and now of each day, to draw upon our deepest cultural reserves.

Fr. Conrad: The Pope has canonized them already; an act which no Pope in history would dare do it: “My visit takes place at a time when men and women of good will are marking the anniversaries of several great Americans.” What is more he qualifies them and recommends them as models to be imitated thus: “These men and women offer us a way of seeing and interpreting reality. In honoring their memory, we are inspired, even amid conflicts, and in the here and now of each day, to draw upon our deepest cultural reserves.”

Pope: I would like to mention four of these Americans: Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and Thomas Merton.

Fr. Conrad: One of the key reasons he went there was to canonize Juniper Serra the great Jesuit saint but in reality he abandons him for these above saints, canonized on the spur of the moment.

 

Pope: This year marks the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the guardian of liberty, who labored tirelessly that “this nation, under God, [might] have a new birth of freedom”. Building a future of freedom requires love of the common good and cooperation in a spirit of subsidiarity and solidarity.

Fr. Conrad: Was he passing a judgment on Abraham Lincoln who may have not followed his principles in total: “Building a future of freedom requires love of the common good and cooperation in a spirit of subsidiarity and solidarity.”

Pope: All of us are quite aware of, and deeply worried by, the disturbing social and political situation of the world today. Our world is increasingly a place of violent conflict, hatred and brutal atrocities, committed even in the name of God and of religion. We know that no religion is immune from forms of individual delusion or ideological extremism. This means that we must be especially attentive to every type of fundamentalism, whether religious or of any other kind. A delicate balance is required to combat violence perpetrated in the name of a religion, an ideology or an economic system, while also safeguarding religious freedom, intellectual freedom and individual freedoms. But there is another temptation which we must especially guard against: the simplistic reductionism which sees only good or evil; or, if you will, the righteous and sinners. The contemporary world, with its open wounds which affect so many of our brothers and sisters, demands that we confront every form of polarization which would divide it into these two camps. We know that in the attempt to be freed of the enemy without, we can be tempted to feed the enemy within. To imitate the hatred and violence of tyrants and murderers is the best way to take their place. That is something which you, as a people, reject.

Fr. Conrad: Need to be more worried about the Pope’s ideological extremism rooted in the so called relativism which Emeritus pope Benedict XVI often cautioned and condemned. Likewise the fundamentalism of the Pope to preach what is contrary to the will of Christ and his Church down the century is disturbing.

Interpreting one of the current world crisis the Pope has embarked on a Political agenda rather than interpreting reality from a Christian world view. Compare with what Jesus has to say in the light of the Pope’s abolition of the 2 camps: “Think you, that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, no; but separation. For there shall be from henceforth five in one house divided: three against two, and two against three. The father shall be divided against the son, and the son against his father, the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother, the mother in law against her daughter in law, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.” Luke 12:51-53

Pope: Our response must instead be one of hope and healing, of peace and justice. We are asked to summon the courage and the intelligence to resolve today’s many geopolitical and economic crises. Even in the developed world, the effects of unjust structures and actions are all too apparent. Our efforts must aim at restoring hope, righting wrongs, maintaining commitments, and thus promoting the well-being of individuals and of peoples. We must move forward together, as one, in a renewed spirit of fraternity and solidarity, cooperating generously for the common good.

Fr. Conrad: From where do we “summon the courage and the intelligence to resolve today’s many geopolitical and economic crisis”? The Pope seem to have a panacea for every problem but rooted in human efforts. Put your own house in order: Correct the Cardinals and Bishops who have been abusing their office and even sack those of your close advisors who have been doing so. Be less humanistic and more just because they don’t go together at least in your case Pope Francis. But how will you do it if you yourself are acting false to your office as Pope?

Pope: The challenges facing us today call for a renewal of that spirit of cooperation, which has accomplished so much good throughout the history of the United States. The complexity, the gravity and the urgency of these challenges demand that we pool our resources and talents, and resolve to support one another, with respect for our differences and our convictions of conscience.

Fr. Conrad: What is that good, if any, accomplished by the “spirit of cooperation”? Is this really the Pope or a politician or an imposter?

Pope: In this land, the various religious denominations have greatly contributed to building and strengthening society. It is important that today, as in the past, the voice of faith continue to be heard, for it is a voice of fraternity and love, which tries to bring out the best in each person and in each society. Such cooperation is a powerful resource in the battle to eliminate new global forms of slavery, born of grave injustices which can be overcome only through new policies and new forms of social consensus.

Fr. Conrad: “Voice of faith … for it is a voice fraternity and love …” – An insidious agenda of the Pope and what he wants to accomplish by holding a position of power in the Catholic Church. We are not far from the many UNITY’s in order to accomplish a one world religion and government; the beginning of the ruin which the scriptures and all the major prophecies warn us about.

Pope: Here I think of the political history of the United States, where democracy is deeply rooted in the mind of the American people. All political activity must serve and promote the good of the human person and be based on respect for his or her dignity. “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” (Declaration of Independence, 4 July 1776). If politics must truly be at the service of the human person, it follows that it cannot be a slave to the economy and finance. Politics is, instead, an expression of our compelling need to live as one, in order to build as one the greatest common good: that of a community which sacrifices particular interests in order to share, in justice and peace, its goods, its interests, its social life. I do not underestimate the difficulty that this involves, but I encourage you in this effort.

Fr. Conrad: What good that highest good that we can accomplish in the human person which cannot be accomplished by the gospel of our Lord and savior Jesus Christ; who mandated that this gospel be preached to all nations. “… not that there is another gospel, but there are some who trouble you and want to pervert the gospel of Christ. But even if we, or an angel from heaven, should preach to you a gospel contrary to that which we preached to you, let him be accursed.

 

 

 

As we have said before, so now I say again, If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to that which you received, let him be accursed.” Gal 1:7-9

The new gospel of Pope Francis: “need to live as one, in order to build as one the greatest common good: that of a community which sacrifices particular interests in order to share, in justice and peace, its goods, its interests, its social life. I do not underestimate the difficulty that this involves, but I encourage you in this effort.”

Pope: Here too I think of the march which Martin Luther King led from Selma to Montgomery fifty years ago as part of the campaign to fulfill his “dream” of full civil and political rights for African Americans. That dream continues to inspire us all. I am happy that America continues to be, for many, a land of “dreams”. Dreams which lead to action, to participation, to commitment. Dreams which awaken what is deepest and truest in the life of a people.

Fr. Conrad: Continuation of the new gospel of dreams, which definitely inspires the Pope and he boldly asserts his judgment: “That dream continues to inspire us all.” – Definitely not me!

Compare the Pope’s dream with that of the exhortation of Scriptures: “Therefore let us go forth to him outside the camp and bear the abuse he endured. For here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city which is to come.” Heb 13:13-14

I am still willing to continue to endure the abuses of one of his 9 advisors rather than dream the dream of Martin Luther or the Pope and his cohorts.

Pope: In recent centuries, millions of people came to this land to pursue their dream of building a future in freedom. We, the people of this continent, are not fearful of foreigners, because most of us were once foreigners. I say this to you as the son of immigrants, knowing that so many of you are also descended from immigrants. Tragically, the rights of those who were here long before us were not always respected. For those peoples and their nations, from the heart of American democracy, I wish to reaffirm my highest esteem and appreciation. Those first contacts were often turbulent and violent, but it is difficult to judge the past by the criteria of the present. Nonetheless, when the stranger in our midst appeals to us, we must not repeat the sins and the errors of the past. We must resolve now to live as nobly and as justly as possible, as we educate new generations not to turn their back on our “neighbors” and everything around us. Building a nation calls us to recognize that we must constantly relate to others, rejecting a mindset of hostility in order to adopt one of reciprocal subsidiarity, in a constant effort to do our best. I am confident that we can do this.

Fr. Conrad: Instead the Pope would have done better at simultaneously also speaking to immigrants to abide by the law of the land which they want to adopt. You create hostility too. Will this my writing be received with the same “reciprocal subsidiarity” and acted upon with equal “reciprocal subsidiarity”?

Pope: Our world is facing a refugee crisis of a magnitude not seen since the Second World War. This presents us with great challenges and many hard decisions. On this continent, too, thousands of persons are led to travel north in search of a better life for themselves and for their loved ones, in search of greater opportunities. Is this not what we want for our own children? We must not be taken aback by their numbers, but rather view them as persons, seeing their faces and listening to their stories, trying to respond as best we can to their situation. To respond in a way which is always humane, just and fraternal. We need to avoid a common temptation nowadays: to discard whatever proves troublesome. Let us remember the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” (Mt 7:12).

Fr. Conrad: What has created and who has created this ‘refugee crisis’ and how about addressing them at its root or addressing those nations who have caused it?

Pope: This Rule points us in a clear direction. Let us treat others with the same passion and compassion with which we want to be treated. Let us seek for others the same possibilities which we seek for ourselves. Let us help others to grow, as we would like to be helped ourselves. In a word, if we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities. The yardstick we use for others will be the yardstick which time will use for us. The Golden Rule also reminds us of our responsibility to protect and defend human life at every stage of its development.

Fr. Conrad: Any rule apart from the gospel context becomes a dud! What if the two type of people are insecure? What if the two type of people are in need of life? What if the two type of people need opportunities? Who gives to whom? How can one give to the other what they don’t have it themselves?

Pope: This conviction has led me, from the beginning of my ministry, to advocate at different levels for the global abolition of the death penalty. I am convinced that this way is the best, since every life is sacred, every human person is endowed with an inalienable dignity, and society can only benefit from the rehabilitation of those convicted of crimes. Recently my brother bishops here in the United States renewed their call for the abolition of the death penalty. Not only do I support them, but I also offer encouragement to all those who are convinced that a just and necessary punishment must never exclude the dimension of hope and the goal of rehabilitation.

Fr. Conrad: “The society can benefit from the rehabilitation of those convicted of crimes”, While the pope has said it, the fascists did it well by making the prisoners work and benefitted much.

Pope: In these times when social concerns are so important, I cannot fail to mention the Servant of God Dorothy Day, who founded the Catholic Worker Movement. Her social activism, her passion for justice and for the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel, her faith, and the example of the saints.

Fr. Conrad: By now, I am beginning to have my doubts about the Pope’s intentions in choosing these and avoiding Junipero Serra, whom he has officially canonized already. Was Dorothy Day, always inspired by the Gospel and the example of the saints? Her writings and life story, her many unchristian actions and her lack of control on many of her own actions and on the fruit of her work speaks volumes of this person. American money did make her a servant of God.

 

 

 

 

Pope: How much progress has been made in this area in so many parts of the world! How much has been done in these first years of the third millennium to raise people out of extreme poverty! I know that you share my conviction that much more still needs to be done, and that in times of crisis and economic hardship a spirit of global solidarity must not be lost. At the same time I would encourage you to keep in mind all those people around us who are trapped in a cycle of poverty. They too need to be given hope. The fight against poverty and hunger must be fought constantly and on many fronts, especially in its causes. I know that many Americans today, as in the past, are working to deal with this problem.

Fr. Conrad: Political agenda! How about tackling the poverty, i.e. spiritual, for which you were ordained rather than seeking to tackle the poverty which the politicians were ordained to solve? That poverty cannot be solved if the Pope himself continues to preach a gospel other than which St. Paul has preached (cfr. Gal. 1: 7-9).

Pope: It goes without saying that part of this great effort is the creation and distribution of wealth. The right use of natural resources, the proper application of technology and the harnessing of the spirit of enterprise are essential elements of an economy which seeks to be modern, inclusive and sustainable. “Business is a noble vocation, directed to producing wealth and improving the world. It can be a fruitful source of prosperity for the area in which it operates, especially if it sees the creation of jobs as an essential part of its service to the common good” (Laudato Si’, 129). This common good also includes the earth, a central theme of the encyclical which I recently wrote in order to “enter into dialogue with all people about our common home” (ibid. 3). “We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all” (ibid., 14).

Fr. Conrad: God not only doesn’t exist in his preaching on creation but seems completely impotent to intervene in creation.

In Laudato Si’, I call for a courageous and responsible effort to “redirect our steps” (ibid. 61), and to avert the most serious effects of the environmental deterioration caused by human activity. I am convinced that we can make a difference and I have no doubt that the United States – and this Congress – have an important role to play. Now is the time for courageous actions and strategies, aimed at implementing a “culture of care” (ibid., 231) and “an integrated approach to combating poverty, restoring dignity to the excluded, and at the same time protecting nature” (ibid., 139). “We have the freedom needed to limit and direct technology” (ibid. 112); “to devise intelligent ways of… developing and limiting our power” (ibid., 78); and to put technology “at the service of another type of progress, one which is healthier, more human, more social, more integral” (ibid., 112). In this regard, I am confident that America’s outstanding academic and research institutions can make a vital contribution in the years ahead.

Fr. Conrad: “We have the freedom needed to limit and direct technology” (ibid. 112)??? “to devise intelligent ways of… developing and limiting our power” (ibid., 78)???

A new way of being church, isn’t it or is it not a new religion?

Pope: A century ago, at the beginning of the Great War, which Pope Benedict XV termed a “pointless slaughter”, another notable American was born: the Cistercian monk Thomas Merton. He remains a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people. In his autobiography he wrote: “I came into the world. Free by nature, in the image of God, I was nevertheless the prisoner of my own violence and my own selfishness, in the image of the world into which I was born. That world was the picture of Hell, full of men like myself, loving God, and yet hating him; born to love him, living instead in fear of hopeless self-contradictory hungers”. Merton was above all a man of prayer, a thinker who challenged the certitudes of his time and opened new horizons for souls and for the Church. He was also a man of dialogue, a promoter of peace between peoples and religions.

Fr. Conrad: Another heretic eulogized by the Pope and set as an example for imitation so that one is definitely led into the abyss of hell.

Pope: From this perspective of dialogue, I would like to recognize the efforts made in recent months to help overcome historic differences linked to painful episodes of the past. It is my duty to build bridges and to help all men and women, in any way possible, to do the same. When countries which have been at odds resume the path of dialogue – a dialogue which may have been interrupted for the most legitimate of reasons – new opportunities open up for all. This has required, and requires, courage and daring, which is not the same as irresponsibility. A good political leader is one who, with the interests of all in mind, seizes the moment in a spirit of openness and pragmatism. A good political leader always opts to initiate processes rather than possessing spaces (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 222-223).

Fr. Conrad: A utopian dream! Reality is different!

Being at the service of dialogue and peace also means being truly determined to minimize and, in the long term, to end the many armed conflicts throughout our world. Here we have to ask ourselves: Why are deadly weapons being sold to those who plan to inflict untold suffering on individuals and society? Sadly, the answer, as we all know, is simply for money: money that is drenched in blood, often innocent blood. In the face of this shameful and culpable silence, it is our duty to confront the problem and to stop the arms trade.

Fr. Conrad: Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth has spoken; Is the Pope no longer a servant of the living tradition and scriptures but a servant of “dialogue and peace”? We now need to believe in the Pope rather than scriptures or tradition for answers. (cf. James 4:1-4)

Pope: Three sons and a daughter of this land, four individuals and four dreams: Lincoln, liberty; Martin Luther King, liberty in plurality and non-exclusion; Dorothy Day, social justice and the rights of persons; and Thomas Merton, the capacity for dialogue and openness to God.

Pope: Four representatives of the American people.

Fr. Conrad: New saints of the Catholic Church to imitate!

 

 

 

 

Pope: I will end my visit to your country in Philadelphia, where I will take part in the World Meeting of Families. It is my wish that throughout my visit the family should be a recurrent theme. How essential the family has been to the building of this country! And how worthy it remains of our support and encouragement! Yet I cannot hide my concern for the family, which is threatened, perhaps as never before, from within and without. Fundamental relationships are being called into question, as is the very basis of marriage and the family. I can only reiterate the importance and, above all, the richness and the beauty of family life.

Fr. Conrad: continue further thus ………. Without God!

Pope: In particular, I would like to call attention to those family members who are the most vulnerable, the young. For many of them, a future filled with countless possibilities beckons, yet so many others seem disoriented and aimless, trapped in a hopeless maze of violence, abuse and despair. Their problems are our problems. We cannot avoid them. We need to face them together, to talk about them and to seek effective solutions rather than getting bogged down in discussions. At the risk of oversimplifying, we might say that we live in a culture which pressures young people not to start a family, because they lack possibilities for the future. Yet this same culture presents others with so many options that they too are dissuaded from starting a family.

Fr. Conrad: again continue further thus ………. Without God! But now in this paragraph he seems to have taken the place of God, with a praxis orientation. (cf. 2 Thessalonians 2: 4)

Pope: A nation can be considered great when it defends liberty as Lincoln did, when it fosters a culture which enables people to “dream” of full rights for all their brothers and sisters, as Martin Luther King sought to do; when it strives for justice and the cause of the oppressed, as Dorothy Day did by her tireless work, the fruit of a faith which becomes dialogue and sows peace in the contemplative style of Thomas Merton.

Fr. Conrad: Called to be imitators of the new saints of Pope Francis.

Pope: In these remarks I have sought to present some of the richness of your cultural heritage, of the spirit of the American people. It is my desire that this spirit continue to develop and grow, so that as many young people as possible can inherit and dwell in a land which has inspired so many people to dream.

Fr. Conrad: O the reason why he was elected a Pope, viz. to proclaim godless heretical things!

Pope: God bless America!

Fr. Conrad: God help those who are reading these things and pray for a great outpouring of mercy because we are in a time of deception and falsehood and not “be carried about by every wind of doctrine by the wickedness of men, by cunning craftiness, by which they lie in wait to deceive”. (Ephesians 4:13)

 

 

Some Quick Thoughts on the Pope’s Congressional Address

http://www.onepeterfive.com/some-quick-thoughts-on-the-popes-congressional-address

By Steve Skojec, September 24, 2015

I don’t want to spend a great deal of time on the text of the speech. You can read it for yourself. But there are a few of points I want to highlight and ask questions about.

 

First, I said in my post yesterday morning that the White House address was a missed opportunity to talk about abortion in a week when Congress was duking it out over defunding Planned Parenthood. People got angry with me. I said at the end of the post, “Here’s hoping that in the Congressional address tomorrow, our modern holocaust gets more than a passing mention.”

I was forcing myself to be optimistic. There’s a reason why I usually don’t do that. Today, what we actually got — in terms of references to the pro-life position — was this:

 

Let us remember the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” (Mt 7:12).

This Rule points us in a clear direction.  Let us treat others with the same passion and compassion with which we want to be treated.  Let us seek for others the same possibilities which we seek for ourselves.  Let us help others to grow, as we would like to be helped ourselves.  In a word, if we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities.  The yardstick we use for others will be the yardstick which time will use for us.  The Golden Rule also reminds us of our responsibility to protect and defend human life at every stage of its development.

This conviction has led me, from the beginning of my ministry, to advocate at different levels for the global abolition of the death penalty.  I am convinced that this way is the best, since every life is sacred, every human person is endowed with an inalienable dignity, and society can only benefit from the rehabilitation of those convicted of crimes.  Recently my brother bishops here in the United States renewed their call for the abolition of the death penalty.  Not only do I support them, but I also offer encouragement to all those who are convinced that a just and necessary punishment must never exclude the dimension of hope and the goal of rehabilitation.

 

In addition to the fact that this is the most bare-bones acknowledgement of the sanctity of life one could get in a speech before a governmental body that sends half a billion dollars a year to an organization that kills millions of children and sells their parts to the highest bidder, the entire emphasis was placed on abolition of the death penalty, which is not even consonant with the long-held teaching of the Church. (And as a friend asked me after reading the speech, “When did ‘murderer on death row’ become a stage of human development?”)

Statistically speaking, another friend of mine pointed out that more than twice as many babies are killed every day in the U.S. through legalized abortion than there have been criminals executed in the four decades since the re-introduction of the death penalty. (2,800+ legal abortions every day [reported] vs. 1414 executions since 1976.) Why is capital punishment the priority?

 

Second, we have the issue of marriage, which is under the most ferocious attack it has ever weathered since the 3rd chapter of Genesis. On that topic, the pope said:

 

I cannot hide my concern for the family, which is threatened, perhaps as never before, from within and without.  Fundamental relationships are being called into question, as is the very basis of marriage and the family.  I can only reiterate the importance and, above all, the richness and the beauty of family life.

Read those words and tell me what they mean. Don’t project your own interpretation or bias — words in themselves signify something. Do these three sentences signify a defense of marriage in a country that just legalized sodomite relationships under that same definition? Particularly when you take this into account.

 

Life and family leaders worldwide are alarmed by a list the Vatican released today containing the names of those who will participate in the upcoming Synod on the Family, including a special list of 45 prelates handpicked by Pope Francis, many of whom publicly support positions contrary to the teaching or practice of the Catholic Church.

“The Ordinary Synod has a heterodox agenda and many of the prelates attending it have already shown themselves either supportive of that agenda or unwilling to resist it,” stated Voice of the Family, a group of Catholic laity from major pro-life and pro-family organizations worldwide, in a press release today.

“The family is now under grave danger from within the Church, as well as from international institutions and national governments,” the group said.

The list of “members by Papal appointment” includes a number of controversial figures whose actions or statements have caused Catholics from different parts of the world to question their orthodoxy…

 

You should really follow the link and read the roster, making note of each man’s record of opposition to Church teaching on marriage. If the Holy Father is concerned about marriage, my suggestion would be to start by culling that list – and soon, because the Synod is only 10 days away.

 

My third point would be simply to note the issues that got the bulk of his air time: labor, the elderly, immigration, refugees, indigenous peoples, the environment, the arms trade, war, dialogue between nations, economic injustice, etc. There are a number of important things to discuss in these arenas, but isn’t it odd that the Vicar of Christ never once mentioned Christ as the answer? That the Holy Name of Jesus was not spoken? That the four Americans used as the basis for his remarks (Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton) were favorites among political and religious progressives, and none of them were saints? (We do have American saints. The pope just canonized the most recent one yesterday.)

 

Finally, when the pope came out to address the crowds gathered outside the Capitol, he said, “I will ask God to bless” those present. But he did not bless anyone. There was no sign of the cross. And then, at the conclusion of his prayer, he said, “I ask you all please to pray for me, and if there are among you any who do not believe or cannot pray, I ask you please to send good wishes my way.”

What?

See it for yourself:

Was this a Papal blessing?

VIDEO 2:28

 

I’ve written about this last part before:

If thinking positively can have such a profound effect on your own life, what of thinking positively on behalf of others? I’m not talking about offering a person going through a crisis good advice, or rousing your team with an inspired pep-talk; I’m speaking of the mental exercise of sending “good vibes” in the direction of someone experiencing hard times. To me, this sounds a great deal like what many people call prayer. Only not. It’s directed from person-to-person, rather than from person-to-God-to-person. As such, I can’t help but wonder why a person would skip the God step in this equation unless they either:

a.)    Don’t believe in Him

b.)    Are afraid that others might be offended if they were to admit that they do believe.

Option “b” may not be particularly courageous, but it is, at least, understandable. Option “a,” though? To not believe in God but offer to do something that looks very much like praying just doesn’t make any sense.

[…]

Our society values niceties over virtues. We embrace being crass while doing everything in our power not to offend. We tolerate everything but believe in nothing. And when these paradoxical forces converge, they cancel each other out and create a potent strain of mediocrity that dilutes the meaning of all human interaction.

 

It was, I suspect you’ll agree, a very strange thing to do.

 

 

 

At the end of the day, I’m left struggling with what to make of it. Based on the reactions I’m seeing online, it seems events like today are a sort of Rorschach test, devoid of much real meaning, but vague enough that those who wish to project their own interpretation on them may do so. There’s a lot of gushing in the Catholic social media sphere today. It’s a pretty big head-scratcher considering the meager fare we were offered on the big issues of our day.

You can certainly find good in what Pope Francis said today. There are just enough touch points to find — if you’re looking for it — some Catholic influence here. But this speech could almost as easily have been given by a non-denominational member of Congress. The “blessing” afterward wasn’t; it was really just a prayer of the sort that a sitting president could say without technical violating the First Amendment. It’s the kind you might here in a huddle at your average public high school football game in the Bible Belt.

I’ll get kicked in the teeth for saying it, but this simply wasn’t an impressive outing for Pope Francis. He had an opportunity, and he didn’t take it. We need firm moral leadership from our pope. When are we going to get it?

 

19 out of 56 readers’ comments:

1. “… [H]e’s simply not effective at being Pope.” You nail it in less than ten words. And, like you, many of us are simply exhausted, fed up with a sub-par performance.

2. I feel so very conflicted these days. I read the address at the White House with some initial excitement that ended up falling flat. I read the Congressional address with even more excitement as it seemed a slightly more appropriate time to hit crucial issues, thinking that perhaps he was saving those remarks for that opportunity (and for which I actually wouldn’t fault him… trying to be strategic in delivering his remarks, whether the best way or not.) Throughout the address there were moments of hope regarding his statements, particularly when he delivered that line regarding the sanctity of life… and then he talked about the death penalty. I felt like a whoopie cushion – getting excited and then I start making funny sputtering noises as it fell flat.

I desperately WANT to love Pope Francis and his pontificate. Regardless of what we may think of the man or his policies, he is the Holy Father. Many people in my life, very good traditional leaning Catholics, are so excited with him here in the country and exclaiming “I love Pope Francis!” but I just can’t feel that same excitement and more often than not just keep my mouth shut as I know they’re not open to my assessments. I’ve tried to make every excuse I can for him, and I’m tired. I believe he’s a very good man, very well meaning, I would venture to say even a holy man (feel free to disagree with my comments), but he’s simply not effective at being Pope.

I look at Father Benedict (as he prefers to be called now) recalling his papacy and it was spectacular. He did what was needed, he upheld the teaching of the church, he reached out to those hurt, appointments of bishops were spectacular… I look back to St. John Paul the Great, and that was something altogether different. He made mistakes, but there was something like the human excitement around the “Francis Effect,” except it was in the spiritual realm. He changed the world. If the Roman Exorcist is to be believed, the demons hate him terribly. St. John Paul II was just that, a saint. I don’t know that there’s been another Pope like him. Francis follow-up is just so lackluster. Perhaps he would have been a good pope at another time in history, but right now… I’m just tired. I want a Successor to Peter I can trust.

3. Can Benedict hop on a plane and maybe fill in the blanks we so desperately need filled?

4. The Pope addressed the national leaders and didn’t once mention Christ, and only gave passing reference to the culture of life and never said the word abortion.

5. This visit was about as much pomp and splendor as any pope has been accorded or part of in history. How about all the $$$s spent for this? How did this help the poor and down-trodden? This pope is a tragedy for the Church. Some popes in our past were truly ‘bad’ or evil. This pope tries to hide behind benign positions, confusion by articulating vague murmurings, and plain outright deception. He will be the cause of schisms, not the healing of the Church.

6. As in the words of a prelate from Kazakhstan in a recent video on the forthcoming Synod, “…beautiful words without the spirit of the Gospel.” http://www.pch24.pl/tv,kryzys-nas-synod…

7. We ain’t going to get much from Pope Francis; I would love to know why he felt the need to be SO vague. What is it going to take for SOMEONE to state the blunt truth that babies are being murdered and their body parts are being harvested! Any bishops? Pope Francis? Nope. Ugh! Why is everyone soooo afraid to speak up???

8. And just before reading your post, Steve, I saw a headline from some pious group that read, ”Congress Hears Pope Francis Defend Marriage and Family.” Even if it weren’t a gross exaggeration of what really happened on Capitol Hill today, why should this even be a headline? Isn’t it a lot like headlining the sun rising in the east this morning? Things only got worse as I read into the first paragraph of the accompanying missive:

”Pope Francis gave a historic address to Congress and other political leaders in Washington just minutes ago and made it clear in his own words that the overall theme of his visit to America is that he wishes to uphold the family, and support marriage.”

The politicians actually present at the speech must be wondering what Catholics put in their drinks, wondering if perhaps the Department of Justice should be notified. If it’s powerful enough to cause this level of delusion, chances are it’s also illegal.

9. Very good Steve. When it’s all said and done what we are left with is a whole lot of nothing from this Pope. When it comes to spiritual solutions to our many problems, he tends to distance himself from Christ and God while embracing materialist solutions, as if to say he doesn’t believe in the helpful grace of God. There is something deadening and depressing about the joy he expresses. It doesn’t seem to be based on the love of God but rather on the public adulation he receives for honoring the gods of Modernism. Let us pray for him and hope his reign ends soon. And let us also pray that God gives us some saints who will lead us in the battle against Satan.

 

 

 

10. I kept waiting for him to make a sign of the cross, and it never came. I kept waiting for a simple acknowledgment of Jesus Christ before the greatest secular power on earth, and it never came.

And yet, did we really expect anything different?

11. “We need firm moral leadership from our pope. When are we going to get it?

We won’t. The shepherd has walked away. Unfortunately for us, it is not really within the scope of the sheep to transform into shepherds, nor is it realistic for the sheep to democratically come to conclusive decisions that will guide them to safety. Such is a very freemasonic concept.

No. At this point, the wolves move in and eat the sheep. And once all the sheep are devoured, there will be no more bleating. No more complaints or worries any longer. Once the sheep are gone, there will be peace.

I can only conclude that this is the kind of peace that Freemasonic secularists–and Pope Francis–is aiming for.

12. We now have the power of positive thinking theology. Pope Francis is careful to tell people how wonderful they are and to takes stands like climate change that show him to be concerned about the planet, that he cares, and no one will be faulted for pleading on behalf of poor refugees. Notice Pope Francis telling the U.S. Congress and President to accept refugees and treat them well. Notice that he did not tell the president and Congress that they should not engage in wars with so many countries and indulge in assassinations that also kill many innocents, and that these actions have produced refugees. The unnecessary invasion of Iraq by the wonderful forces of the United States resulted in the possible elimination of Catholics who lived in Iraq for thousands of years, and since some of the Iraqi Christians took refuge in Syria, now our efforts to overthrow Assad has made Syrians refugees along with the Christians who were given refuge in Syria under Assad. Now Pope Francis had a chance to tell the Americans they shouldn’t destroy countries just because they could, but he didn’t. It would not make him popular with the American mob. So instead of denouncing destructive wars that ruined vast areas, the number of birth defects in Iraqi’s living in Fallujah where a lot of depleted uranium shells fired by American forces polluted the area for years to come, he preached concern about the environment, as that won him the applause of the numerous greenies. I am a Catholic and I expect Catholic Popes to take stands on matters of justice that will not make him the toast of the town. I heard nothing about Pope Francis’s humility but wouldn’t a truly humble person be made uncomfortable by all the celebrity treatment given him. So he rides in a Fiat. I am a Catholic who gets very worried to see the head of the Catholic Church feted by the world which is otherwise quite anti-Catholic. Pope Francis is more the politician than Pope. I have nothing against being nice, I try to be nice myself, most of the time anyway, but there is more to the Catholic faith than being nice. To save the world from all sorts of disaster we need to have the world recognize the Kingship of Christ over all nations, not just a carbon tax.

13. Bergoglio’s US tour seems the antithesis of St. John the Baptist’s witness to Christ:

“He must increase but I must decrease.” John 3:30

14. All I feel from this speech is anxiety. I’m not even asking why anymore. There is no point in “why” when you are tied to the whipping post. You just have wait for it to end.

15. Prior to this, we here in the US have been wondering about Pope Francis and pundits and Vatican officials have been trying to clarify or tell us what he really said. Now, after today, we can all agree and know the truth that, at the very least, Pope Francis is not a leader and his emphasis is not on theology or the sacrifice of Jesus of Christ, but through diplomacy and the cause of man.

16. Many of us here in the US have not wondered about him. We knew the man.

17. One observation which strikes me particularly with this pope: he never gives a proper blessing. I remember when JP2 passed by when he visited the UK, to a man everyone around me said “he looked at me” when he gave the blessing. Everyone felt that particular iteration of the sign of the cross was ‘just for them’. I never see Francis giving the sign of the cross as his procession passes along, he just waves. Weird.

18. I’m going to say it, I miss Pope Benedict XVI, he called out those who needed it, corrected those who needed corrected, and confirmed the Faith of the brethren. I’ve decided to not watch anything regarding these papal trips.

19. “We need firm moral leadership from our pope. When are we going to get it?”

After the next conclave?

 

The Pope at the United States Congress: political activity must promote the good of the person and be based on human dignity
http://www.news.va/en/news/the-pope-at-the-united-states-congress-political-a

Vatican City, September 25, 2015

The United States Congress, which met yesterday in joint session (an assembly of both the House of Representatives and the Senate) was addressed by a Pope for the first time in its history. Francis’ arrival was announced by the speaker of the House of Representatives and Republican house leader John Boehner, and by the vice president of the United States, the Democrat Joe Biden. The extraordinary session was also attended by, among others, the dean of the Diplomatic Corps, the Supreme Court, and the secretary of State John Kerry.

The Pope was greeted with a standing ovation and delivered a discourse in English, published in full below, in which he underlined that all political activity must serve the good of the human person and be based on respect and dignity. Francis referred to four great Americans: President Abraham Lincoln, “guardian of liberty”, the political activist Martin Luther King, whose “dream of equality continues to inspire us all”, Dorothy Day, founder of the Catholic Worker Movement, whose “social activism, passion for justice and the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel”, and the Cistercian monk Thomas Merton, “a thinker who challenged the certitudes of his time and … a man of dialogue, a promoter of peace between peoples and religions”.

The following is the full text of the Holy Father’s address:

 

 

“I am most grateful for your invitation to address this Joint Session of Congress in ‘the land of the free and the home of the brave’. I would like to think that the reason for this is that I too am a son of this great continent, from which we have all received so much and toward which we share a common responsibility.

“Each son or daughter of a given country has a mission, a personal and social responsibility. Your own responsibility as members of Congress is to enable this country, by your legislative activity, to grow as a nation. You are the face of its people, their representatives. You are called to defend and preserve the dignity of your fellow citizens in the tireless and demanding pursuit of the common good, for this is the chief aim of all politics. A political society endures when it seeks, as a vocation, to satisfy common needs by stimulating the growth of all its members, especially those in situations of greater vulnerability or risk. Legislative activity is always based on care for the people. To this you have been invited, called and convened by those who elected you.

“Yours is a work which makes me reflect in two ways on the figure of Moses. On the one hand, the patriarch and lawgiver of the people of Israel symbolises the need of peoples to keep alive their sense of unity by means of just legislation. On the other, the figure of Moses leads us directly to God and thus to the transcendent dignity of the human being. Moses provides us with a good synthesis of your work: you are asked to protect, by means of the law, the image and likeness fashioned by God on every human face.

“Today I would like not only to address you, but through you the entire people of the United States. Here, together with their representatives, I would like to take this opportunity to dialogue with the many thousands of men and women who strive each day to do an honest day’s work, to bring home their daily bread, to save money and –one step at a time – to build a better life for their families. These are men and women who are not concerned simply with paying their taxes, but in their own quiet way sustain the life of society. They generate solidarity by their actions, and they create organisations which offer a helping hand to those most in need.

“I would also like to enter into dialogue with the many elderly persons who are a storehouse of wisdom forged by experience, and who seek in many ways, especially through volunteer work, to share their stories and their insights. I know that many of them are retired, but still active; they keep working to build up this land. I also want to dialogue with all those young people who are working to realise their great and noble aspirations, who are not led astray by facile proposals, and who face difficult situations, often as a result of immaturity on the part of many adults. I wish to dialogue with all of you, and I would like to do so through the historical memory of your people.

“My visit takes place at a time when men and women of good will are marking the anniversaries of several great Americans. The complexities of history and the reality of human weakness notwithstanding, these men and women, for all their many differences and limitations, were able by hard work and self-sacrifice – some at the cost of their lives – to build a better future. They shaped fundamental values which will endure forever in the spirit of the American people. A people with this spirit can live through many crises, tensions and conflicts, while always finding the resources to move forward, and to do so with dignity. These men and women offer us a way of seeing and interpreting reality. In honouring their memory, we are inspired, even amid conflicts, and in the here and now of each day, to draw upon our deepest cultural reserves.

“I would like to mention four of these Americans: Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day and Thomas Merton.

“This year marks the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the guardian of liberty, who laboured tirelessly that ‘this nation, under God, [might] have a new birth of freedom’. Building a future of freedom requires love of the common good and cooperation in a spirit of subsidiarity and solidarity.

“All of us are quite aware of, and deeply worried by, the disturbing social and political situation of the world today. Our world is increasingly a place of violent conflict, hatred and brutal atrocities, committed even in the name of God and of religion. We know that no religion is immune from forms of individual delusion or ideological extremism. This means that we must be especially attentive to every type of fundamentalism, whether religious or of any other kind. A delicate balance is required to combat violence perpetrated in the name of a religion, an ideology or an economic system, while also safeguarding religious freedom, intellectual freedom and individual freedoms. But there is another temptation which we must especially guard against: the simplistic reductionism which sees only good or evil; or, if you will, the righteous and sinners. The contemporary world, with its open wounds which affect so many of our brothers and sisters, demands that we confront every form of polarisation which would divide it into these two camps. We know that in the attempt to be freed of the enemy without, we can be tempted to feed the enemy within. To imitate the hatred and violence of tyrants and murderers is the best way to take their place. That is something which you, as a people, reject.

“Our response must instead be one of hope and healing, of peace and justice. We are asked to summon the courage and the intelligence to resolve today’s many geopolitical and economic crises. Even in the developed world, the effects of unjust structures and actions are all too apparent. Our efforts must aim at restoring hope, righting wrongs, maintaining commitments, and thus promoting the well-being of individuals and of peoples. We must move forward together, as one, in a renewed spirit of fraternity and solidarity, cooperating generously for the common good.

“The challenges facing us today call for a renewal of that spirit of cooperation, which has accomplished so much good throughout the history of the United States. The complexity, the gravity and the urgency of these challenges demand that we pool our resources and talents, and resolve to support one another, with respect for our differences and our convictions of conscience.

“In this land, the various religious denominations have greatly contributed to building and strengthening society. It is important that today, as in the past, the voice of faith continue to be heard, for it is a voice of fraternity and love, which tries to bring out the best in each person and in each society. Such cooperation is a powerful resource in the battle to eliminate new global forms of slavery, born of grave injustices which can be overcome only through new policies and new forms of social consensus.

 

 

 

“Here I think of the political history of the United States, where democracy is deeply rooted in the mind of the American people. All political activity must serve and promote the good of the human person and be based on respect for his or her dignity. ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’. If politics must truly be at the service of the human person, it follows that it cannot be a slave to the economy and finance. Politics is, instead, an expression of our compelling need to live as one, in order to build as one the greatest common good: that of a community which sacrifices particular interests in order to share, in justice and peace, its goods, its interests, its social life. I do not underestimate the difficulty that this involves, but I encourage you in this effort.

“Here too I think of the march which Martin Luther King led from Selma to Montgomery fifty years ago as part of the campaign to fulfil his ‘dream’ of full civil and political rights for African Americans. That dream continues to inspire us all. I am happy that America continues to be, for many, a land of ‘dreams’. Dreams which lead to action, to participation, to commitment. Dreams which awaken what is deepest and truest in the life of a people.

“In recent centuries, millions of people came to this land to pursue their dream of building a future in freedom. We, the people of this continent, are not fearful of foreigners, because most of us were once foreigners. I say this to you as the son of immigrants, knowing that so many of you are also descended from immigrants. Tragically, the rights of those who were here long before us were not always respected. For those peoples and their nations, from the heart of American democracy, I wish to reaffirm my highest esteem and appreciation. Those first contacts were often turbulent and violent, but it is difficult to judge the past by the criteria of the present. Nonetheless, when the stranger in our midst appeals to us, we must not repeat the sins and the errors of the past. We must resolve now to live as nobly and as justly as possible, as we educate new generations not to turn their back on our ‘neighbours’ and everything around us. Building a nation calls us to recognise that we must constantly relate to others, rejecting a mindset of hostility in order to adopt one of reciprocal subsidiarity, in a constant effort to do our best. I am confident that we can do this.

“Our world is facing a refugee crisis of a magnitude not seen since the Second World War. This presents us with great challenges and many hard decisions. On this continent, too, thousands of persons are led to travel north in search of a better life for themselves and for their loved ones, in search of greater opportunities. Is this not what we want for our own children? We must not be taken aback by their numbers, but rather view them as persons, seeing their faces and listening to their stories, trying to respond as best we can to their situation. To respond in a way which is always humane, just and fraternal. We need to avoid a common temptation nowadays: to discard whatever proves troublesome. Let us remember the Golden Rule: ‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you’.

“This Rule points us in a clear direction. Let us treat others with the same passion and compassion with which we want to be treated. Let us seek for others the same possibilities which we seek for ourselves. Let us help others to grow, as we would like to be helped ourselves. In a word, if we want security, let us give security; if we want life, let us give life; if we want opportunities, let us provide opportunities. The yardstick we use for others will be the yardstick which time will use for us. The Golden Rule also reminds us of our responsibility to protect and defend human life at every stage of its development.

“This conviction has led me, from the beginning of my ministry, to advocate at different levels for the global abolition of the death penalty. I am convinced that this way is the best, since every life is sacred, every human person is endowed with an inalienable dignity, and society can only benefit from the rehabilitation of those convicted of crimes. Recently my brother bishops here in the United States renewed their call for the abolition of the death penalty. Not only do I support them, but I also offer encouragement to all those who are convinced that a just and necessary punishment must never exclude the dimension of hope and the goal of rehabilitation.

“In these times when social concerns are so important, I cannot fail to mention the Servant of God Dorothy Day, who founded the Catholic Worker Movement. Her social activism, her passion for justice and for the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel, her faith, and the example of the saints.

“How much progress has been made in this area in so many parts of the world! How much has been done in these first years of the third millennium to raise people out of extreme poverty! I know that you share my conviction that much more still needs to be done, and that in times of crisis and economic hardship a spirit of global solidarity must not be lost. At the same time I would encourage you to keep in mind all those people around us who are trapped in a cycle of poverty. They too need to be given hope. The fight against poverty and hunger must be fought constantly and on many fronts, especially in its causes. I know that many Americans today, as in the past, are working to deal with this problem.

“It goes without saying that part of this great effort is the creation and distribution of wealth. The right use of natural resources, the proper application of technology and the harnessing of the spirit of enterprise are essential elements of an economy which seeks to be modern, inclusive and sustainable. ‘Business is a noble vocation, directed to producing wealth and improving the world. It can be a fruitful source of prosperity for the area in which it operates, especially if it sees the creation of jobs as an essential part of its service to the common good’. This common good also includes the earth, a central theme of the encyclical which I recently wrote in order to ‘enter into dialogue with all people about our common home’. ‘We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all’.

“In ‘Laudato Si”, I call for a courageous and responsible effort to ‘redirect our steps’, and to avert the most serious effects of the environmental deterioration caused by human activity. I am convinced that we can make a difference and I have no doubt that the United States – and this Congress – have an important role to play. Now is the time for courageous actions and strategies, aimed at implementing a ‘culture of care’ and ‘an integrated approach to combating poverty, restoring dignity to the excluded, and at the same time protecting nature’. ‘We have the freedom needed to limit and direct technology’; ‘to devise intelligent ways of… developing and limiting our power’; and to put technology ‘at the service of another type of progress, one which is healthier, more human, more social, more integral’. In this regard, I am confident that America’s outstanding academic and research institutions can make a vital contribution in the years ahead.

 

 

 

“A century ago, at the beginning of the Great War, which Pope Benedict XV termed a ‘pointless slaughter’, another notable American was born: the Cistercian monk Thomas Merton. He remains a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people. In his autobiography he wrote: ‘I came into the world. Free by nature, in the image of God, I was nevertheless the prisoner of my own violence and my own selfishness, in the image of the world into which I was born. That world was the picture of Hell, full of men like myself, loving God, and yet hating Him; born to love Him, living instead in fear of hopeless self-contradictory hungers’. Merton was above all a man of prayer, a thinker who challenged the certitudes of his time and opened new horizons for souls and for the Church. He was also a man of dialogue, a promoter of peace between peoples and religions.

“From this perspective of dialogue, I would like to recognise the efforts made in recent months to help overcome historic differences linked to painful episodes of the past. It is my duty to build bridges and to help all men and women, in any way possible, to do the same. When countries which have been at odds resume the path of dialogue – a dialogue which may have been interrupted for the most legitimate of reasons – new opportunities open up for all. This has required, and requires, courage and daring, which is not the same as irresponsibility. A good political leader is one who, with the interests of all in mind, seizes the moment in a spirit of openness and pragmatism. A good political leader always opts to initiate processes rather than possessing spaces.

“Being at the service of dialogue and peace also means being truly determined to minimize and, in the long term, to end the many armed conflicts throughout our world. Here we have to ask ourselves: Why are deadly weapons being sold to those who plan to inflict untold suffering on individuals and society? Sadly, the answer, as we all know, is simply for money: money that is drenched in blood, often innocent blood. In the face of this shameful and culpable silence, it is our duty to confront the problem and to stop the arms trade.

“Three sons and a daughter of this land, four individuals and four dreams: Lincoln, liberty; Martin Luther King, liberty in plurality and non-exclusion; Dorothy Day, social justice and the rights of persons; and Thomas Merton, the capacity for dialogue and openness to God.

Four representatives of the American people.

“I will end my visit to your country in Philadelphia, where I will take part in the World Meeting of Families. It is my wish that throughout my visit the family should be a recurrent theme. How essential the family has been to the building of this country! And how worthy it remains of our support and encouragement! Yet I cannot hide my concern for the family, which is threatened, perhaps as never before, from within and without. Fundamental relationships are being called into question, as is the very basis of marriage and the family. I can only reiterate the importance and, above all, the richness and the beauty of family life.

“In particular, I would like to call attention to those family members who are the most vulnerable, the young. For many of them, a future filled with countless possibilities beckons, yet so many others seem disoriented and aimless, trapped in a hopeless maze of violence, abuse and despair. Their problems are our problems. We cannot avoid them. We need to face them together, to talk about them and to seek effective solutions rather than getting bogged down in discussions. At the risk of oversimplifying, we might say that we live in a culture which pressures young people not to start a family, because they lack possibilities for the future. Yet this same culture presents others with so many options that they too are dissuaded from starting a family.

“A nation can be considered great when it defends liberty as Lincoln did, when it fosters a culture which enables people to ‘dream’ of full rights for all their brothers and sisters, as Martin Luther King sought to do; when it strives for justice and the cause of the oppressed, as Dorothy Day did by her tireless work, the fruit of a faith which becomes dialogue and sows peace in the contemplative style of Thomas Merton.

“In these remarks I have sought to present some of the richness of your cultural heritage, of the spirit of the American people. It is my desire that this spirit continue to develop and grow, so that as many young people as possible can inherit and dwell in a land which has inspired so many people to dream. God bless America!”

After his address, the Pope was accompanied by House Speaker Boehmer to the Hall of Statuary where he viewed the statue of Fr. Junipero Serra, before proceeding to the Great Hall of the Library of Congress, where he presented the gift of a precious edition of the Bible. Then, accompanied by the leaders of Congress and members of the papal entourage, they both appeared on the balcony from where the Pope greeted and blessed the crowd gathered in the National Mall.

“Good day to you all!” he said, in Spanish. “I thank you for your welcome and your presence. I thank the most important people here: the children. I wish to ask God to bless them. Lord, Father of all, bless this people, bless each one of them, bless their families, give them what they need most. And I ask you, please to pray for me. And those of you who do not believe, or are unable to pray, please wish me well. God bless America!”

 

 

Christ was not a divine ecologist: Opposing view

http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2015/09/24/pope-francis-congress-catholicism-editorials-debates/72761330/

By Steve Skojec, September 25, 2015

Roman Catholic Church risks becoming the very NGO Pope Francis has condemned.

Early in his papacy, Pope Francis admonished that the Catholic Church is not a “humanitarian agency, the church is not an NGO (non-governmental organization). The church is sent to bring Christ and his Gospel to all.”

As Thursday’s congressional address emphasized, however, Francis’ priorities are climate change, economic justice, marginalization and the poor, while little emphasis is placed on the deep moral and spiritual crisis that threatens our eternal salvation or our subsequent need for authentic conversion.

This diversion from the church’s traditional focus has won critical acclaim from the secular world and raised expectations that at last there’s a pope who will force Catholicism to “get with the times.”

 

 

At the core of our faith, however, is the belief that its doctrines — founded upon divinely revealed truths — are unchangeable.

Yet under the auspices of “pastoral concern” or “mercy,” we hear a commonly expressed anticipation that Francis will reverse this or that long-held teaching. This is pure wishful thinking, but it is indulged by many high-ranking church prelates, and at times, it seems, by Francis himself.

Stewardship over creation is one of the first responsibilities God gave to Adam and Eve. Care for the poor and the destitute was an important tenet of Jesus’ public ministry. But Christ was not a divine ecologist or social worker. Jesus Christ fed the poor, but his principal concern was their spiritual nourishment.

Appropriate Christian concern for temporal matters is virtuous, but when isolated from the salvific message of the Gospels, the church risks becoming the very NGO Francis has condemned.

When true sanctity is replaced with ersatz religious materialism, we easily forget our reason for existence: to know, love and serve God in this life, and to be happy with him in the next.

Truly, “our common home” is not earth, but heaven. More than ever, our world needs the pope to fix his eyes firmly there — not here — and to lead us to our eternal destination.

Steve Skojec is the founding publisher and executive director of OnePeterFive.com, a journal about Catholic theology, tradition and culture.

 

 

My USA Today Op-Ed: Christ Was Not a Divine Ecologist

http://www.onepeterfive.com/my-usa-today-op-ed-christ-was-not-a-divine-ecologist

By Steve Skojec, September 25, 2015

A couple of days ago, I got an email from a member of the USA Today editorial board:

Would you be interested in writing what we call an “opposing view” for USA Today on the Pope’s address to Congress and the general direction he has taken since his election? We are going to write an editorial praising him for taking on such issues as climate change and poverty. We are looking for a different perspective that would be more critical of what he has done and what he says on Thursday. It would be 350 words and due Thursday afternoon.

 

As I’ve previously stated, it makes me nervous to be the go-to guy for “opposition.” As a cradle Catholic who has devoted most of the past 20 years to deepening my understanding and defense of the faith, being at odds with my pope is a source of constant tension and discomfort. I’ve been called a lot of names in the past week or two. I’ve been accused of hate. I’ve had people fantasize in open forums about killing me. I’ve been maligned with accusations of antisemitism and sedevacantism. I’ve seen people warn others to stay away from this website and our work, as if we’re somehow a danger to the faith.

All of this by people who call themselves “Catholic.”

Still, I remain convinced that now is the time to have this discussion about the papacy, its priorities, its allies and enemies, and this crisis in the Church which has existed for many years but has recently intensified by orders of magnitude. It’d be my preference that we have a conversation about these things like adults. There’s nothing I can do about these people, other than to pray for them. I’m not in it for the money, because there’s precious little of it. I’m not in it for the “fame,” because it’s mostly notoriety and contempt. I’m not in it because it makes my life easier in any conceivable way.

I do this because I love Jesus Christ and His Mystical Bride, the Church, more than anything in this world. And I refuse to stand by and watch the things I love most be abused or neglected, even by those charged with their care.

And so, I agreed to write the op-ed, which was published today. (You can see the other side of the argument, from the USA Today editorial board, right here.)

 

Early in his papacy, Pope Francis admonished that the Catholic Church is not a “humanitarian agency, the church is not an NGO (non-governmental organization). The church is sent to bring Christ and his Gospel to all.”

As Thursday’s congressional address emphasized, however, Francis’ priorities are climate change, economic justice, marginalization and the poor, while little emphasis is placed on the deep moral and spiritual crisis that threatens our eternal salvation or our subsequent need for authentic conversion.

This diversion from the church’s traditional focus has won critical acclaim from the secular world and raised expectations that at last there’s a pope who will force Catholicism to “get with the times.”

At the core of our faith, however, is the belief that its doctrines — founded upon divinely revealed truths — are unchangeable.

Yet under the auspices of “pastoral concern” or “mercy,” we hear a commonly expressed anticipation that Francis will reverse this or that long-held teaching. This is pure wishful thinking, but it is indulged by many high-ranking church prelates, and at times, it seems, by Francis himself.

Stewardship over creation is one of the first responsibilities God gave to Adam and Eve. Care for the poor and the destitute was an important tenet of Jesus’ public ministry. But Christ was not a divine ecologist or social worker. Jesus Christ fed the poor, but his principal concern was their spiritual nourishment.

Appropriate Christian concern for temporal matters is virtuous, but when isolated from the salvific message of the Gospels, the church risks becoming the very NGO Francis has condemned.

When true sanctity is replaced with ersatz religious materialism, we easily forget our reason for existence: to know, love and serve God in this life, and to be happy with him in the next.

 

 

Truly, “our common home” is not earth, but heaven. More than ever, our world needs the pope to fix his eyes firmly there — not here — and to lead us to our eternal destination.

There is, however, something missing from the published version. In the original, I wrote:

Stewardship over creation is one of the first responsibilities God gave to Adam and Eve. Care for the poor and the destitute was an important tenet of Jesus’ public ministry. But Christ was not a divine ecologist or social worker. He fed the poor, but His principal concern was their spiritual nourishment: “Your ancestors ate the manna in the wilderness, and they died.” He said. “I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live forever…” (Jn. 6: 49, 51)

 

The bolded line — a pivotal scripture passage in making my case — was edited out.

When I received the copy back from the editor last night, it came in an email as I was out running errands. I didn’t have the chance to respond right away. When I did, I asked why that line was taken out. “I know it’s a secular audience,” I wrote, “but I was attempting to show rather than tell that Jesus was focused on what I said He was focused on. Since we’re talking about the leader of the largest Christian denomination in the world, I didn’t think it would entirely out of place to put one reference to what Christ said in the piece.”

My contact responded, “I don’t know why the desk chose to trim what it did. We’re certainly not averse to running passages from the Bible.”

So I asked again to have the line reinstated, since I didn’t exceed my word limit. I never heard back. Shortly thereafter, I saw that it had already gone to print.

It’s possible that there just wasn’t room. I wasn’t told whether the word limit included my single-sentence bio. Looking at the print version, I concede it may have been an issue of space:

 


 

 

 

But it was just one line, and insofar as it was Our Lord Himself making the point I was trying to illustrate, a pretty important one. I wish it could have stayed in. Maybe something else I said could have been taken out instead. That passage was the only thing removed. I’m not accusing anyone of malice – I just think it’s very unfortunate.

When all is said and done, I’m still content with what I wrote. I prayed a lot before doing it, and asked the same from others. My detractors would no doubt scoff at this, but it’s really important to me to ask for God’s guidance when dealing with such delicate topics. My prayer is always, “Let me do Your will in this work and not my own.” In this case in particular, 350 words isn’t much space to make a nuanced point about a complex and controversial issue, so I hope I did it justice. USA Today is the third-largest newspaper by circulation in the country. It’s not every day I’ll have a chance like this.

My only regret is that with the name and message of Jesus getting very little play in this week’s public discourse about the Catholic Faith, He wound up, in part, disappearing here, too. His absence has grown conspicuous where His presence should be central. It’s our job to put Him back.

 

1 out of 11 readers’ comments:

1. Brilliant, Steve. My favorite line, which could be the title of a book, is “it seems”. Yes, that is a great title for a book about this papacy.

That said, the removal of that one pivotal line is highly ironic. The one line that makes it absolutely clear what your bigger point is was removed. Is this not the very issue with this papacy? What not clear if it’s the Pope or his handlers that have done the editing.

To address the world on the world stage and not mention the name of Jesus EVEN ONCE seems calculated to diminish him, and the shame he seems to bring. Yet, at no other name will the world bow and confess “Lord”. I just don’t get how you don’t mention Jesus, whether you are Pope Peter, Pope JPII, Pope Benedict XVI, or Pope Francis.

With Peter, we know he did mention him by name, and that is what got him in trouble, and got him results:

Acts 2:ff “…listen to what I have to say: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with deeds of power, wonders, and signs that God did through him among you, as you yourselves know— this man, handed over to you according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God…But God raised him up, having freed him from death, because it was impossible for him to be held in its power…This Jesus God raised up, and of that all of us are witnesses. Being therefore exalted at the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, he has poured out this that you both see and hear…God has made him both Lord and Messiah. …
Now when they heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and to the other apostles, “Brothers, what should we do?” Peter said to them, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.”

Imagine if the Pope addressed the world this way! Just once! It’s the Gospel! Plain and simple! The Reformation would immediately be undone, Christians would become one, and we could avoid the wrath to come or save more souls at least mitigate it. Sigh…

The basic impression the Pope leaves is that Jesus is that important. The power is in the name, not in the solar panels.

 

 

Pope Francis has just canonized an American, Junipero Serra, as a saint of the Catholic Church.

So, who is Thomas Merton who Pope Francis mentioned THRICE in his address to Congress while completely avoiding any mention of the newly-canonized Saint??

Thomas Merton
was a proponent and Master of
Zen Buddhist
meditation.

http://www.wayoflife.org/files/d7a9b5c88f9d24dce14197125be6b482-149.html
EXTRACT

The very influential Trappist monk Thomas Merton was “a strong builder of bridges between East and West” (Twentieth-Century Mystics, p. 39). He was a student of Zen master Daisetsu Suzuki and Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh. In fact, Merton claimed to be both a Buddhist and a Christian. The titles of his books include Zen and the Birds of the Appetite and Mystics and the Zen Masters. He said: “I see no contradiction between Buddhism and Christianity. The future of Zen is in the West. I intend to become as good a Buddhist as I can” (David Steindl-Rast, “Recollection of Thomas Merton’s Last Days in the West,” Monastic Studies, 7:10, 1969, http://www.gratefulness.org/readings/dsr_merton_recol2.htm).

 

Merton had encountered Zen Buddhism, Sufism, Taoism and Vedanta many years prior to his Asian journey. MERTON WAS ABLE TO UNCOVER THE STREAM WHERE THE WISDOM OF EAST AND WEST MERGE AND FLOW TOGETHER, BEYOND DOGMA, IN THE DEPTHS OF INNER EXPERIENCE. … Merton embraced the spiritual philosophies of the East and integrated this wisdom into (his) own life through direct practice”

Source: Yoga Journal, Jan.-Feb. 1999, quoted from Lighthouse Trails web site).

 

http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=710812
EXTRACT

As is the case with Thomas Merton, a Trappist monk, his writings may have begun entirely orthodox, but slowly, almost imperceptibly, crept into eastern mysticism that lead away from the Catholic faith.

 

The February 3, 2003, Vatican Document on the New Age Movement

Footnote 15 lists an array of figures whose works are counted as influential by New Age practitioners:

 

 

 

When preparing her book “The Aquarian Conspiracy”, a manifesto on the New Age Movement, in the 1980s, New Ager Marilyn Ferguson surveyed the influence of prominent New Agers on the thinking of the individual. Ferguson calls them “Aquarian conspirators”.

When respondents were asked to name individuals whose ideas had influenced them, either through personal contact or through their writings, those most often named, in order of frequency, were Pierre Teilhard de Chardin*, C.G. Jung, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers … Sri Aurobindo, Swami Muktananda, D.T. Suzuki, Thomas Merton

 

Some Deceptions of the New Age Movement

www.catholicassociates.com/leaflets/Somedeceptionsfthenewage.pdf
EXTRACT

One of the ways in which New Age ideas can be spread is through Prayer Techniques. We hear of nuns who pray in the lotus position; friars who recite mantras in their cells; courses in Zen meditation in parishes and convents. Add to this the teaching of Anthony de Mello, Bede Griffiths, Thomas Merton and others, and one begins to realise the extent of the problem. 

 

That then is the man who Pope Francis held up to the world as an ideal American!!!!!!!!

 

*Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, the world’s leading New Ager according to the 2003 Vatican Document, is appealed to by Pope Francis, although only in the Notes (53), in his Encyclical Laudato Si’s point no. 83. In that Encyclical, he has not cited ANYONE else; just this New Ager!

It seems to be a habit with him!!!

 

To be continued…

 

THIS MINISTRY’S FILES ON THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY AND ON POPE FRANCIS:

 


 

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3 replies

  1. THE SYNOD
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-QUESTIONNAIRE
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-QUESTIONNAIRE.doc
    THE EXTRAORDINARY SYNOD OF BISHOPS ON THE FAMILY AT THE VATICAN
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_EXTRAORDINARY_SYNOD_OF_BISHOPS_ON_THE_FAMILY_AT_THE_VATICAN.doc
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-THE MID-WAY REPORT
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-THE_MID-WAY_REPORT.doc
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-THE CONCERNS OF THIS MINISTRY STAND VINDICATED
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-THE_CONCERNS_OF_THIS_MINISTRY_STAND_VINDICATED.doc
    SYNOD ON THE FAMILY 01-FR JOHN ZUHLSDORF
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY_01-FR_JOHN_ZUHLSDORF.doc
    CCBI QUESTIONNAIRE FOR THE OCTOBER 2015 SYNOD ON THE FAMILY
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/CCBI_QUESTIONNAIRE_FOR_THE_OCTOBER_2015_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY.doc
    IS THE ARCHDIOCESE OF BOMBAY IN THE LIBERAL CAMP AT THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/IS_THE_ARCHDIOCESE_OF_BOMBAY_IN_THE_LIBERAL_CAMP_AT_THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY.doc
    SURVEY FOR THE OCTOBER 2015 SYNOD ON THE FAMILY: WHOM DID THE QUESTIONNAIRE REACH?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/SURVEY_FOR_THE_OCTOBER_2015_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-WHOM_DID_THE_QUESTIONNAIRE_REACH.doc
    PROPOSAL TO ROME FOR THE OCTOBER 2015 SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-ALEX BENZIGER
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/PROPOSAL_TO_ROME_FOR_THE_OCTOBER_2015_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-ALEX_BENZIGER.doc
    CRITICIZING VATICAN COUNCIL II-IS IT HERESY?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/CRITICIZING_VATICAN_COUNCIL_II-IS_IT_HERESY.doc
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-WE ARE AT WAR
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-WE_ARE_AT_WAR.doc
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-100 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-100_QUESTIONS_AND_ANSWERS.pdf
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-BETWEEN HERESY AND SCHISM 01
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-BETWEEN_HERESY_AND_SCHISM_01.doc
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-BETWEEN HERESY AND SCHISM 02
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-BETWEEN_HERESY_AND_SCHISM_02.doc
    THE SYNOD ON THE FAMILY-SCANDALOUS DEMAND OF THE INDIAN BISHOPS TO PERMIT USE OF CONTRACEPTIVES
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_SYNOD_ON_THE_FAMILY-SCANDALOUS_DEMAND_OF_THE_INDIAN_BISHOPS_TO_PERMIT_USE_OF_CONTRACEPTIVES.doc

    POPE FRANCIS
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01-WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON MAUNDY THURSDAY
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01-WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_MAUNDY_THURSDAY.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 01A-WASHING THE FEET OF WOMEN ON MAUNDY THURSDAY http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_01A-WASHING_THE_FEET_OF_WOMEN_ON_MAUNDY_THURSDAY.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 02-MEDJUGORJE
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_02-MEDJUGORJE.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 03-HOMOSEXUALITY THE SEX ABUSE CRISIS AND THE GAY LOBBY http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_03-HOMOSEXUALITY_THE_SEX_ABUSE_CRISIS_AND_THE_GAY_LOBBY.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 04-COMPROMISED BY NEW AGE ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_04-COMPROMISED_BY_NEW_AGE_ALTERNATIVE_MEDICINE.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 05-BAPTISM OF ALIENS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_05-BAPTISM_OF_ALIENS.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 06-ENDORSEMENT OF A NEW AGE HEALER FROM INDIA?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_06-ENDORSEMENT_OF_A_NEW_AGE_HEALER_FROM_INDIA.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 08-CONSULTOR TO THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE PRACTISES NEW AGE ADVOCATES THE HERESY OF WOMEN PRIESTS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_08-CONSULTOR_TO_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_PRACTISES_NEW_AGE_ADVOCATES_THE_HERESY_OF_WOMEN_PRIESTS.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 09-THE POPE UNDERGOES NEW AGE TREATMENTS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_09-THE_POPE_UNDERGOES_NEW_AGE_TREATMENTS.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 10-NEW AGE CONSULTOR TO THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE NOW DENIGRATES THE EUCHARIST
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_10-NEW_AGE_CONSULTOR_TO_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_NOW_DENIGRATES_THE_EUCHARIST.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 11-PRESIDENT OF THE PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR CULTURE JOINS IN RELIGIOUS RITUAL OF NEW AGE CULT
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_11-PRESIDENT_OF_THE_PONTIFICAL_COUNCIL_FOR_CULTURE_JOINS_IN_RELIGIOUS_RITUAL_OF_NEW_AGE_CULT.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 12-CATHOLIC CRITICISM OF ENCYCLICAL LAUDATO SI’
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_12-CATHOLIC_CRITICISM_OF_ENCYCLICAL_LAUDATO_SI’.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 13-SOME QUESTIONABLE ECCLESIAL APPOINTMENTS OF POPE FRANCIS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_13-SOME_QUESTIONABLE_ECCLESIAL_APPOINTMENTS_OF_POPE_FRANCIS.doc
    QUO VADIS PAPA FRANCISCO 14-A DANGEROUS POPE CHALLENGING THE CHURCH?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/QUO_VADIS_PAPA_FRANCISCO_14-A_DANGEROUS_POPE_CHALLENGING_THE_CHURCH.doc
    IS POPE FRANCIS UNDERGOING TREATMENT WITH NEW AGE ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/IS_POPE_FRANCIS_UNDERGOING_TREATMENT_WITH_NEW_AGE_ALTERNATIVE_THERAPIES.doc

    CARDINAL OSWALD GRACIAS INTERPRETS POPE FRANCIS PERSONAL REMARK ON HOMOSEXUALS AS CHURCH TEACHING
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/CARDINAL_OSWALD_GRACIAS_INTERPRETS_POPE_FRANCIS_PERSONAL_REMARK_ON_HOMOSEXUALS_AS_CHURCH_TEACHING.doc
    THE FRANCIS EFFECT & WHO AM I TO JUDGE-THE SPIRIT OF VATICAN COUNCIL II?
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_FRANCIS_EFFECT_&_WHO_AM_I_TO_JUDGE-THE_SPIRIT_OF_VATICAN_COUNCIL_II.doc

    DOCUMENTS
    INSTRUMENTUM LABORIS SYNOD OF BISHOPS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/INSTRUMENTUM_LABORIS.pdf
    LINEAMENTA-THE VOCATION AND MISSION OF THE FAMILY IN THE CHURCH AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD¬- SYNOD OF BISHOPS

    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/THE_VOCATION_AND_MISSION_OF_THE_FAMILY_IN_THE_CHURCH_AND_CONTEMPORARY_WORLD¬-SYNOD_OF_BISHOPS.doc
    LAUDATO SI’ -ON CARE FOR OUR COMMON HOME POPE FRANCIS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/LAUDATO_SI‘.doc
    MITUS IUDEX DOMINUS IESUS AND MITUS ET MISERICORS IESUS (ON ANNULMENTS) POPE FRANCIS
    http://ephesians-511.net/docs/MITUS_IUDEX_DOMINUS_IESUS_AND_MITUS_ET_MISERICORS_IESUS.doc

  2. I agree. He is speaking in generalities. He is trying to unite world faith into one. At the White House he commented on the evil of the death penalty but no mention of abortion. I am not surprised. You can see how this new age is beginning to take shape. Pray the Rosary!

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

  3. I didn’t hear the part about abortion. But still pray the Rosary.

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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